Monthly Archives: October 2018

Baby in Water Closet – Colonist Tavern, Norwood.

Baby in Water Closet – Colonist Tavern, Norwood.


A newly born male baby, weighing 7 pounds, was found in the water closet (toilet) of the Colonist Inn on the Parade Norwood, in 1880. During the newborns autopsy, held by Dr Verco, it was revealed that child had been born recently, but was mostly likely a still born, as the child had never tried to breath. However, if the mother had of been with a mid-wife, there was evidence the child would have lived.
An inquest into the death was held at Destitute Asylum on Kermode Street in Adelaide, by the City Coroner where details of how the baby came to be in the toilet were revealed. 
Mary Hand, an inn servant revealed that a young lady named Ellen MacNamara visited the Old Colonist Inn on May 17th, 1880. Helen claimed to be very tired and went to bed without dinner.
 The next day, Ellen helped Mary with some of her work, but collapsed. Mary helped her as best she could, and after dinner that night, did not see Ellen again to the following day at 9am.
 That morning Ellen told Mary she had soiled the bedsheets and would wash them out and hang them herself. Ellen washed the sheet but left them in the soaking in the water. Before leaving, Ellen told Mary that she was planning to travel out to the country.
That evening, Mary went into Ellens room to tidy up and found that there were bloodied clothes, and blood on the mattress. She reported the soiled mattress to her bosses Mr and Mrs Bern.
 Mr Bern notified the local police, that he believed a child may have been born in his hotel.
As more details emerged, it was revealed that Ellen MacNamara claimed that she had become pregnant to Sidney George Gilbert, who was a butcher living at Government Gums. Gilberts mother, Ann was called as a witness, and she revealed that Helen had visited her house, saying she was pregnant to her son Sidney.
 Mrs Gilbert took the young girl in as she felt the girl might need some care. In the mean time she wrote to her son asking about Ellen and the chances of her being pregnant to him.
Sidney outright denied getting Ellen pregnant, but Mrs Gilbert allowed the girl to stay with her for 11 weeks, and in that time collected some children’s clothing for unborn child.
 It was revealed to Mrs Gilbert during that 11 weeks, that Ellen did not like, nor want children.
 The reason Ellen left the care of the Gilbert family was revealed. She had been sneaking out at night, and for that reason Mr Gilbert, who did not want the girl under his roof, insisted she leave.
Helen left the baby clothes at the Gilberts, still wrapped, and made her way to the Old Colonist Inn.
 Alfred Pickford was the next witness, a former employer of MacNamara. 
MacNamara has seen Pickford wife and told her she had spent some time in the Destitute Asylum, that she had been promised marriage from a man in the country, and that the baby had died. She stated that that very morning she was released.
 As it turns out, that very day, was the same day she had left the Old Colonist Inn.
Miss Ellen MacNamara, it was revealed, had given birth to the child of Sidney Gilbert. Sidney had written letters to her saying he would arrange to marry her, after she had the child, and travelled to where he lived.
 She had concealed her pregnancy due to being unmarried and had given birth to the still-born child in the room she rented at the Old Colonist Inn.
 The Jury asked for charges of “Concealment of Birth” to be pressed by the Police on Miss MacNamara.
Ellen MacNamara, 22 (sometimes known as Frawley) pleased guilty to charges of Concealment of Baby. She was sentenced to 3 months of imprisonment.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018
Bibliography
1880 ‘CORONER’S INQUEST.’, The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 – 1922), 8 June, p. 2. (SECOND EDITION.), viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207589684
1880 ‘CORONERS’ INQUESTS.’, South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 – 1881), 12 June, p. 9. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94751416
1880 ‘TELEGRAMS.’, Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), 9 June, p. 3. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77588306
1880 ‘Law Courts.’, South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 – 1881), 7 August, p. 10. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94752475

Baby in Water Closet – Colonist Tavern, Norwood.

Baby in Water Closet – Colonist Tavern, Norwood.


A newly born male baby, weighing 7 pounds was found in the water closet (toilet) of the Colonist Inn on the Parade Norwood, in 1880. During the newborns autopsy, held by Dr Verco, it was revealed that child had been born recently, but was mostly likely still born as the child had never tried to breath. However, if the mother had have been with a mid-wife, there was evidence the child would of lived.
An inquest into the death was held at Destitute Asylum on Kermode Street in Adelaide, by the City Coroner where details of how the baby came to be in the toilet were revealed. 
Mary Hand, an inn servant revealed that a young lady named Ellen MacNamara visited the Old Colonist Inn on May 17th, 1880. Helen claimed to be very tired and went to bed without dinner.
 The next day, Ellen helped Mary with some of her work, but collapsed. Mary helped her as best she could, and after dinner that night, did not see Ellen again until the following day at 9 am.

 That morning Ellen told Mary she had soiled the bed-sheets and would wash them out and hang them herself. Ellen washed the sheets but left them soaking in the water. Before leaving, Ellen told Mary that she was planning to travel out to the country.
That evening, Mary went into Ellen’s room to tidy up and found that there were bloodied clothes, and blood on the mattress. She reported the soiled mattress to her bosses Mr and Mrs Bern.
 Mr Bern notified the local police, that he believed a child may have been born in his hotel.

As more details emerged, it was revealed that Ellen MacNamara claimed that she had become pregnant to Sidney George Gilbert, who was a butcher living at Government Gums. Gilbert’s mother, Ann was called as a witness, and she revealed that Helen had visited her house, saying she was pregnant to her son Sidney.

 Mrs Gilbert took the young girl in as she felt the girl might need some care. In the mean time she wrote to her son asking about Ellen and the chances of her being pregnant to him.
Sidney outright denied getting Ellen pregnant, but Mrs Gilbert allowed the girl to stay with her for 11 weeks, and in that time collected some children’s clothing for the unborn child.
 It was revealed to Mrs Gilbert during that 11 weeks, that Ellen did not like, nor want children.
 The reason Ellen left the care of the Gilbert family was revealed. She had been sneaking out at night, and for that reason Mr Gilbert, who did not want the girl under his roof, insisted she leave.
Helen left the baby clothes at the Gilbert’s, still wrapped, and made her way to the Old Colonist Inn.

 Alfred Pickford was the next witness, a former employer of MacNamara. 
MacNamara has seen Pickford wife and told her she had spent some time in the Destitute Asylum, that she had been promised marriage from a man in the country, and that the baby had died. She stated that that very morning she was released.
 As it turns out, that very day, was the same day she had left the Old Colonist Inn.
Miss Ellen MacNamara, it was revealed, had given birth to the child of Sidney Gilbert. Sidney had written letters to her saying he would arrange to marry her, after she had the child, and traveled to where he lived.
 She had concealed her pregnancy due to being unmarried and had given birth to the still-born child in the room she rented at the Old Colonist Inn.
 The Jury asked for charges of “Concealment of Birth” to be pressed by the Police on Miss MacNamara.
Ellen MacNamara, 22 (sometimes known as Frawley) pleaded guilty to charges of ‘Concealment of a Baby’. She was sentenced to 3 months of imprisonment.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018
Bibliography

1880 ‘CORONER’S INQUEST.’, The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 – 1922), 8 June, p. 2. (SECOND EDITION.), viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207589684

1880 ‘CORONERS’ INQUESTS.’, South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 – 1881), 12 June, p. 9. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94751416

1880 ‘TELEGRAMS.’, Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), 9 June, p. 3. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77588306

1880 ‘Law Courts.’, South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 – 1881), 7 August, p. 10. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94752475

Odious Origins of the Colonist Tavern, Norwood.

Odious Origins of the Colonist Tavern, Norwood.


Frederick and Elizabeth Hobbs immigrated from England on board the ‘Coromandel’, the first immigrant ship to reach South Australia from London. The Coromandel transport 150 couples and 36 children and was Captained by William Chesser. It reached Kingscote, South Australia on the 10th of January 1837.
 One of the Hobbs claims to historical fame is that their first child, a girl, was the first Caucasian baby born in the Colony. The Hobbs third daughter, Martha, would later Marry William Brand, one of the original builders and publicans of the Overland Corner Hotel in South Australia’s Riverland.
Frederick Hobbs, a brick maker purchased land in Norwood and established the Old Colonial Inn, a single-story hotel, in 1851. (He also made the bricks for the original St johns Church of Adelaide.)
Frederick Hobbs, history will show, was a disheveled drunk who was abusive to his towards his wife and family. He was convicted for assaulting his wife Elizabeth on the 22nd of January 1855. He stated that he “supposed it was all right. He had a drop of drink at the time.”

 Elizabeth deposed in court that she had been married to Frederick for 20 years, they had 10 children together and had been living in the colony for 18 years. She accused Frederick of violent abuse for the previous eight years, and that he frequently slept with our women and prostitutes.
 She stated that during the Gold Rush, Frederick had left for Victoria, and their baby had died. Frederick had not been paying his way, and goods from Elizabeth had seized to pay his debts.
 He had returned seven months prior and had been abusive to her ever since.
 The Magistrate noted that Frederick had been in court for physically abusing Mrs Hobbs only weeks previously and had broken his bond in only three days. He had pushed her out of the hotel and had gone into Adelaide and purchased an ad in the local papers telling the public not to trust his wife!
 Frederick came unstuck in court when it was brought into evidence that he had been using Elizabeth Hobbs jewellery and belongings to buy time with prostitutes. One of the local Police knew the women he had been sleeping with and was able to find all the objects Mrs Hobbs described as being “sold” off by Frederick.
 It was also revealed, that Frederick had kicked his wife and children out of the hotel and had been sleeping in their bed with a prostitute. Just to make matters worse, he had also put the hotel up for sale.
The Magistrate ordered that Frederick be bound by a 100 pounds bond, that he could not sell the hotel, and that he makes sure he pays maintenance to Mrs Hobbs for the children.
 Local Brewers offered Mrs Hobbs to put her back into the hotel, as she had proven that she was “of ample character” to stay in business. It was not to be for Mrs Hobbs, with Frederick being charged for consecutive breaches of the Publicans Act, the hotel was quickly sold, and poor Elizabeth found herself and her children at the Destitute Asylum.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2018
Bibliography
Suzanne Hirst & Ross Watts, The Story of the Coromandel in Particular the 1843 3 Masted Sailing Ship (South Australia, 2013)

1926 ‘MARTHA BRAND—PIONEER’, Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA : 1913 – 1942), 19 November, p. 9. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109354382
1853 ‘BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.’, Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904), 19 March, p. 7. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158093225
1855 ‘POLICE COURTS.’, Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904), 24 February, p. 4. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158102282

1855 ‘LAW AND POLICE COURTS.’, Adelaide Times (SA : 1848 – 1858), 24 January, p. 3. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207021261

Odious Origins of the Colonist Tavern, Norwood.

Odious Origins of the Colonist Tavern, Norwood.


Frederick and Elizabeth Hobbs immigrated from England on board the ‘Coromandel’, the first immigrant ship to reach South Australia from London. The Coromandel transport 150 couples and 36 children and was Captained by William Chesser. It reached Kingscote, South Australia on the 10th of January 1837.
 One of the Hobbs claims to historical fame is that their first child, a girl, was the first Caucasian baby born in the Colony. The Hobbs third daughter, Martha, would later Marry William Brand, one of the original builders and publicans of the Overland Corner Hotel in South Australia’s Riverland.
Frederick Hobbs, a brick maker purchased land in Norwood and established the Old Colonial Inn, a single-story hotel, in 1851. (He also made the bricks for the original St johns Church of Adelaide.)
Frederick Hobbs, history will show, was a disheveled drunk who was abusive to his towards his wife and family. He was convicted for assaulting his wife Elizabeth on the 22nd of January 1855. He stated that he “supposed it was all right. He had a drop of drink at the time.”

 Elizabeth deposed in court that she had been married to Frederick for 20 years, they had 10 children together and had been living in the colony for 18 years. She accused Frederick of violent abuse for the previous eight years, and that he frequently slept with our women and prostitutes.
 She stated that during the Gold Rush, Frederick had left for Victoria, and their baby had died. Frederick had not been paying his way, and goods from Elizabeth had seized to pay his debts.
 He had returned seven months prior and had been abusive to her ever since.
 The Magistrate noted that Frederick had been in court for physically abusing Mrs Hobbs only weeks previously and had broken his bond in only three days. He had pushed her out of the hotel and had gone into Adelaide and purchased an ad in the local papers telling the public not to trust his wife!
 Frederick came unstuck in court when it was brought into evidence that he had been using Elizabeth Hobbs jewellery and belongings to buy time with prostitutes. One of the local Police knew the women he had been sleeping with and was able to find all the objects Mrs Hobbs described as being “sold” off by Frederick.
 It was also revealed, that Frederick had kicked his wife and children out of the hotel and had been sleeping in their bed with a prostitute. Just to make matters worse, he had also put the hotel up for sale.
The Magistrate ordered that Frederick be bound by a 100 pounds bond, that he could not sell the hotel, and that he makes sure he pays maintenance to Mrs Hobbs for the children.
 Local Brewers offered Mrs Hobbs to put her back into the hotel, as she had proven that she was “of ample character” to stay in business. It was not to be for Mrs Hobbs, with Frederick being charged for consecutive breaches of the Publicans Act, the hotel was quickly sold, and poor Elizabeth found herself and her children at the Destitute Asylum.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2018
Bibliography
Suzanne Hirst & Ross Watts, The Story of the Coromandel in Particular the 1843 3 Masted Sailing Ship (South Australia, 2013)

1926 ‘MARTHA BRAND—PIONEER’, Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA : 1913 – 1942), 19 November, p. 9. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109354382
1853 ‘BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.’, Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904), 19 March, p. 7. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158093225
1855 ‘POLICE COURTS.’, Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904), 24 February, p. 4. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158102282

1855 ‘LAW AND POLICE COURTS.’, Adelaide Times (SA : 1848 – 1858), 24 January, p. 3. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207021261

MEGAscene

MEGAscene

I’ve written articles for several magazines over the years, but the longest continual series of articles I have written is in South Australia publication, MEGAscene, published on ISSUE by Rising Sun Media.
 MEGAscene first published in September 2015 and is a predominately music based photographic magazine, but also covers other events, and for a little twist, has included an article written by me about a haunting, ghost or other paranormal topic, each issue.
 I thought it might be a good idea to post links to the SA Paranormal articles I have written for MEGAscene, here on this blog, as most you wont find anywhere else online.
So here they are!:
Issue 1:SA Paranormal – An introduction to Allen Tiller, and paranormal stories in South Australia. (Sept 2015)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_1_final/34
Issue 2:Kapunda – an introduction to Australia’s most haunted town. (Oct 2015)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_2/38
Issue 3:The Old Adelaide Gaol – South Australia’s most haunted location (Nov 2015)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_3/54
Issue 4:Martindale Hall – Clare – A historic haunted mansion in the Clare Valley (Jan 2016)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_4/32
Issue 5:Highercombe Hotel – Tea Tree Gully Heritage Museum (Mar 2016)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_5/54
Issue 6:The National Railway Museum – Port Adelaide (April 2016)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_6/54
Issue 7:Cornucopia Hotel – Wallaroo (June 2016)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_7
Issue 8:“The Haunted Boy” Paintings (sometimes known as the “Haunting Boy”) (Sept 2016)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_8/32
Issue 9:The Cornwall Hotel – Moonta (May2017)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_9/46
Issue 10:The Old Mount Gambier Gaol (Aug. 2017)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_10/44
Issue 11:The Royal Arms Hotel – Port Adelaide (March 2018)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_11/56
Issue 12: Ayers House – North Terrace Adelaide (July 2018)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/megascene_issue_12/54
Issue 13: Adelaide Ghosts & Ghouls Walking Tour (Sept 2018)
https://issuu.com/risingstarmedia/docs/issue_13_of_megascene/32
Issue 14:The British Hotel – Port Adelaide (yet to be released at the time of writing this blog)


You can also find MEGAscene on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/megasceneoz/
Happy reading!

Witchcraft VII: – Wends of Ebenezer.

Witchcraft VII: – Wends of Ebenezer.




Ebenezer and St Kitts in the Barossa Valley, two small towns that many readers here would probably have never visited, were originally settled by Wendish immigrants. The Wends were a Germanic people from Lusatia in South East Germany. Lusatia was positioned between the German states of Saxony and Brandenburg, and the polish provinces of Lower Silesia and Lubusz and were mainly isolated from other Germans. They were a people closely related to the Serbs, and their language is very similar. (Lusatian’s are sometimes also known as Sorbs or Wends.)
 Wends were considered a very mystical and spiritual people, and due to historical events like the Thirty-Year War, and the outbreak of the plague, German religious influence crept into the area with many Wends becoming Lutheran (and some Catholic), but the Wends never lost their magical belief.
 
The Wends, despite being treated poorly by Germans, and often sold into slavery, managed to keep intact their language and many of their customs and beliefs, much of which stayed in place centuries later when they emigrated to South Australia in 1851 and established Ebenezer, St Kitts, Dutton and Neukirch.

It is said that the Wendish people of Ebenezer had access to the book; ‘Sixth and Seventh Book of Moses, Magic Sympathetic, Moses, Magic Spirit Master, Mystery of Mysteries.’ which supposedly  contained the knowledge of witchcraft. The book contained magic spells for healing the sick, invoking spirits, breaking or making curses and other traditional magic. It is believed some of these books may still exist in the area, passed down through families as historical tombs of family knowledge.

 Witchcraft was part of daily Wendish goings on for families that practiced it, and for those that didn’t, they still bore the superstitions that followed from their homeland, such things as wearing a red ribbon around one’s neck to stop another bewitching them.

 One story abounds during the late 1800’s in Ebenezer, which is that of an older woman, who it was said was cursed with immortality and could not die, just age, unless she passed the curse onto someone else. Townsfolk avoided her like the plague, so as not to annoy her and have the curse passed onto them.
 A similar version of this immortality curse that surfaced in the area was that those who held the books of Moses could not die, unless they passed those books onto someone else. Just like the old lady, they would age, but not die! Both stories were just folklore used to scare people into not following the traditions of witchcraft.
 
Other Wendish magical beliefs practiced in the Barossa included baptising infants, so they couldn’t be transformed into Will-o-the-wisps. This magic depended on the Godmother of the child stepping over an axe or broom as they entered the baptismal church.
 It was believed witches could become disembodied souls and shapeshift, that they could control animals, especially black dogs and cats. Wends also had traditions from their homeland involving supernatural beings. Some of these included the Pshespoilniza, who would cut the heads of any farmer who did not stop working for an hour at midday. The Wassermann, who was very Bunyip like, was described as a small ugly grey creature with green hair that lived in rivers and ponds that liked to drown people.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018

Witchcraft VII: – Wends of Ebenezer.

Witchcraft VII: – Wends of Ebenezer.




Ebenezer and St Kitts in the Barossa Valley, two small towns that many readers here would probably have never visited, were originally settled by Wendish immigrants. The Wends were Slavic people from Lusatia in South East Germany. Lusatia was positioned between the German states of Saxony and Brandenburg, and the polish provinces of Lower Silesia and Lubusz and was mainly isolated from other Germans. They were a people closely related to the Serbs, and their language is very similar. (Lusatian’s are sometimes also known as Sorbs or Wends.)
 Wends were considered a very mystical and spiritual people, and due to historical events like the Thirty-Year War, and the outbreak of the plague, German religious influence crept into the area with many Wends becoming Lutheran (and some Catholic), but the Wends never lost their magical belief.
 
The Wends, despite being treated poorly by Germans, and often sold into slavery, managed to keep intact their language and many of their customs and beliefs, much of which stayed in place centuries later when they emigrated to South Australia in 1851 and established Ebenezer, St Kitts, Dutton and Neukirch.

It is said that the Wendish people of Ebenezer had access to the book; ‘Sixth and Seventh Book of Moses, Magic Sympathetic, Moses, Magic Spirit Master, Mystery of Mysteries.’ which supposedly contained the knowledge of witchcraft. The book contained magic spells for healing the sick, invoking spirits, breaking or making curses and other traditional magic. It is believed some of these books may still exist in the area, passed down through families as historical tombs of family knowledge.

 Witchcraft was part of daily Wendish goings on for families that practised it, and for those that didn’t, they still bore the superstitions that followed from their homeland, such things as wearing a red ribbon around one’s neck to stop another bewitching them.

 One story abounds during the late 1800s in Ebenezer, which is that of an older woman, who it was said was cursed with immortality and could not die, just age unless she passed the curse onto someone else. Townsfolk avoided her like the plague, so as not to annoy her and have the curse passed onto them.
 A similar version of this immortality curse that surfaced in the area was that those who held the books of Moses could not die unless they passed those books onto someone else. Just like the old lady, they would age, but not die! Both stories were just folklore used to scare people into not following the traditions of witchcraft.
 
Other Wendish magical beliefs practised in the Barossa included baptising infants so they couldn’t be transformed into Will-o-the-wisps. This magic depended on the Godmother of the child stepping over an axe or broom as they entered the baptismal church.
 It was believed witches could become disembodied souls and shapeshift, that they could control animals, especially black dogs and cats. Wends also had traditions from their homeland involving supernatural beings. Some of these included the Pshespoilniza, who would cut the heads of any farmer who did not stop working for an hour at midday. The Wassermann, who was very Bunyip like, was described as a small ugly grey creature with green hair that lived in rivers and ponds that liked to drown people.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018

Witchcraft VI: Koro (Suo-Yang) – Penis Panic

Witchcraft VI: Koro (Suo-Yang) – Penis Panic

Although this infliction has not occurred in Australia, it has shown up in Africa and China, and originates with witchcraft in Medieval Europe. I thought it was interesting enough to research and write about for the blog, as many people have probably never heard of it before!

 Koro, (known as Suo-Yang in China) is psycho-sexual disorder where men become panicked, believing their penis is shrinking, retracting, or completely disappeared.
The Medieval belief of Koro can be found in the fifteenth-century Witch hunting book Malleus Malificarum [Hammer of the Witches] written by Heinrich Kramer and Jacob Sprenger. Within the book, Kramer and Sprenger describe various ways to expose witches, but also a few case studies.

 One of the phenomena he claimed was that witches could remove a mans penis, not actually cut off, but remove it with magic.
 One of the accounts in Kramer & Sprenger’s book details the story of several witnesses to this very magic.

 “What shall we think about those witches who somehow take members in large numbers—twenty or thirty—and shut them up together in a birds’ nest or some box, where they move about like living members, eating oats or other feed? This has been seen by many and is a matter of common talk. It is said that it is all done by devil’s work and illusion, for the senses of those who see [the penises] are deluded in the way we have said.”

It is claimed that the witches would have up to thirty penises’ in a bird’s nest or box, all wriggling about, and would feed them oats and other grains, treating them as pets.
Kramer and Sprenger’s book was full of misogynist and preposterous accusations against women’s sexuality, that stems from their (and Medieval Christian Europe’s) infatuation and anxieties with women’s sexual desires, sexuality and place in the Bible. The whole basis of his book and accusation against female witches, comes back to one passage which led to countless women being accused of witchcraft, and murdered across the world; “All witchcraft comes from carnal lust, which in women is insatiable.”

Headline from the Canberra Times
 Wednesday 8 November 1967, page 6
(link in the bibliography)

Koro, which is a psychological issue, has seen many mass panics in the centuries since the Medieval Witch hunts. In 1967, Singapore was hit with a mass panic, when 454 men visited the Singapore General Hospital over a period on months.

 One of the Doctors who treated the men, stated afterwards that patients reported; “a sudden feeling of retraction of the penis into the abdomen with great fear that, should the retraction be permitted to proceed … the penis would disappear into the abdomen with a fatal outcome.”

The next mass penis-shrinkage-panic happened in China through 1984-1985. Over 3000 individual men were treated for Suo-Yang, weirdly, this time it also included a number of women reporting vulva, labia, nipple and breast shrinkage, or disappearance!

Africa has seen the most recent cases of Koro, with ten years between 1998 and 2008 seeing 56 separate cases. In these cases, the common complaint wasn’t shrinkage, but total loss of penis. 36 people, accused of witchcraft, body part trading, or black mail by penis-snatching were killed in the hysteria that followed accusations over the years.

Zionist Sorcery was apparently the cause of penis-loss in Sudan in 2003. In what was later revealed as an attempt to divert the people’s attention away from what was happening with the presidency.
In 2013, a stranger was visiting a small village in Tiringoulou, Central Africa, when he stopped for a drink. Upon handing the drink to the stranger the vendor suddenly screamed his penis had disappeared, this was soon followed by another villager. Other villagers claimed to see the two men’s penis shrink form adult size to baby size before their eyes! The visitor was duly arrested for sorcery and executed.

Despite the various claims of witchcraft, sorcery and female fox spirits in China stealing penis’s, believe it or not, koro in men and women has a psychological explanation. It would seem in society’s where a person’s reproductive ability helps determine a man’s self-worth, and worth to procreation in their society, are intrinsically connected to anxiety and fear, ethnicity and cultural belief, and political or socioeconomic tension.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018
https://www.facebook.com/TheHauntsOfAdelaide/

Bibliography

Mattelaer, Johan J, Jilek, Wolfgang (2007). “Koro?The Psychological Disappearance of the Penis”. The Journal of Sexual Medicine. 4 (5): 1509–1515. doi:10.1111/j.1743-6109.2007. 00586.x.

Smith, M., (2002). “The flying phallus and the laughing inquisitor: Penis theft in the ‘Malleus Malificarum’”. Journal of Folklore Research An International Journal of Folklore and Ethnomusicology 39(1):85-117 

Edwards, J. W., (1984). “Indigenous Koro, a Genital Retraction Syndrome of Insular Southeast Asia: A Critical Review”. Culture Medicine and Psychiatry 8(1):1-24 · April 1984. DOI: 10.1007/BF00053099

China-Underground. (2016). “Koro, shrinking genitals syndrome”, China-Underground, viewed 13 April 2018, https://china-underground.com/2016/05/14/koro-shrinking-genitals-syndrome/

1967 ‘SINGAPORE KORO ‘NOT THREAT TO MANHOOD”, The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), 8 November, p. 6. , viewed 27 Jul 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106981331

Witchcraft VI: Koro (Suo-Yang) – Penis Panic

Witchcraft VI: Koro (Suo-Yang) – Penis Panic

Although this infliction has not occurred in Australia, it has shown up in Africa and China, and originates with witchcraft in Medieval Europe. I thought it was interesting enough to research and write about for the blog, as many people have probably never heard of it before!

 Koro, (known as Suo-Yang in China) is psycho-sexual disorder where men become panicked, believing their penis is shrinking, retracting, or completely disappeared.
The Medieval belief of Koro can be found in the fifteenth-century Witch hunting book Malleus Malificarum [Hammer of the Witches] written by Heinrich Kramer and Jacob Sprenger. Within the book, Kramer and Sprenger describe various ways to expose witches, but also a few case studies.

 One of the phenomena he claimed was that witches could remove a mans penis, not actually cut off, but remove it with magic.
 One of the accounts in Kramer & Sprenger’s book details the story of several witnesses to this very magic.

 “What shall we think about those witches who somehow take members in large numbers—twenty or thirty—and shut them up together in a birds’ nest or some box, where they move about like living members, eating oats or other feed? This has been seen by many and is a matter of common talk. It is said that it is all done by devil’s work and illusion, for the senses of those who see [the penises] are deluded in the way we have said.”

It is claimed that the witches would have up to thirty penises’ in a bird’s nest or box, all wriggling about, and would feed them oats and other grains, treating them as pets.
Kramer and Sprenger’s book was full of misogynist and preposterous accusations against women’s sexuality, that stems from their (and Medieval Christian Europe’s) infatuation and anxieties with women’s sexual desires, sexuality and place in the Bible. The whole basis of his book and accusation against female witches, comes back to one passage which led to countless women being accused of witchcraft, and murdered across the world; “All witchcraft comes from carnal lust, which in women is insatiable.”

Headline from the Canberra Times
 Wednesday 8 November 1967, page 6
(link in the bibliography)

Koro, which is a psychological issue, has seen many mass panics in the centuries since the Medieval Witch hunts. In 1967, Singapore was hit with a mass panic, when 454 men visited the Singapore General Hospital over a period on months.

 One of the Doctors who treated the men, stated afterwards that patients reported; “a sudden feeling of retraction of the penis into the abdomen with great fear that, should the retraction be permitted to proceed … the penis would disappear into the abdomen with a fatal outcome.”

The next mass penis-shrinkage-panic happened in China through 1984-1985. Over 3000 individual men were treated for Suo-Yang, weirdly, this time it also included a number of women reporting vulva, labia, nipple and breast shrinkage, or disappearance!

Africa has seen the most recent cases of Koro, with ten years between 1998 and 2008 seeing 56 separate cases. In these cases, the common complaint wasn’t shrinkage, but total loss of penis. 36 people, accused of witchcraft, body part trading, or black mail by penis-snatching were killed in the hysteria that followed accusations over the years.

Zionist Sorcery was apparently the cause of penis-loss in Sudan in 2003. In what was later revealed as an attempt to divert the people’s attention away from what was happening with the presidency.
In 2013, a stranger was visiting a small village in Tiringoulou, Central Africa, when he stopped for a drink. Upon handing the drink to the stranger the vendor suddenly screamed his penis had disappeared, this was soon followed by another villager. Other villagers claimed to see the two men’s penis shrink form adult size to baby size before their eyes! The visitor was duly arrested for sorcery and executed.

Despite the various claims of witchcraft, sorcery and female fox spirits in China stealing penis’s, believe it or not, koro in men and women has a psychological explanation. It would seem in society’s where a person’s reproductive ability helps determine a man’s self-worth, and worth to procreation in their society, are intrinsically connected to anxiety and fear, ethnicity and cultural belief, and political or socioeconomic tension.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018
https://www.facebook.com/TheHauntsOfAdelaide/

Bibliography

Mattelaer, Johan J, Jilek, Wolfgang (2007). “Koro?The Psychological Disappearance of the Penis”. The Journal of Sexual Medicine. 4 (5): 1509–1515. doi:10.1111/j.1743-6109.2007. 00586.x.

Smith, M., (2002). “The flying phallus and the laughing inquisitor: Penis theft in the ‘Malleus Malificarum’”. Journal of Folklore Research An International Journal of Folklore and Ethnomusicology 39(1):85-117 

Edwards, J. W., (1984). “Indigenous Koro, a Genital Retraction Syndrome of Insular Southeast Asia: A Critical Review”. Culture Medicine and Psychiatry 8(1):1-24 · April 1984. DOI: 10.1007/BF00053099

China-Underground. (2016). “Koro, shrinking genitals syndrome”, China-Underground, viewed 13 April 2018, https://china-underground.com/2016/05/14/koro-shrinking-genitals-syndrome/

1967 ‘SINGAPORE KORO ‘NOT THREAT TO MANHOOD”, The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), 8 November, p. 6. , viewed 27 Jul 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106981331

Witchcraft VI: Koro (Suo-Yang) – Penis Panic

Witchcraft VI: Koro (Suo-Yang) – Penis Panic

Although this infliction has not occurred in Australia, it has shown up in Africa and China and originates with witchcraft in Medieval Europe. I thought it was interesting enough to research and write about for the blog, as many people have probably never heard of it before!

 Koro, (known as Suo-Yang in China) is a psycho-sexual disorder where men become panicked, believing their penis is shrinking, retracting, or completely disappeared.
The Medieval belief of Koro can be found in the fifteenth-century Witch hunting book Malleus Maleficarum [Hammer of the Witches] written by Heinrich Kramer and Jacob Sprenger. Within the book, Kramer and Sprenger describe various ways to expose witches, but also a few case studies.

 One of the phenomena he claimed was that witches could remove a man’s penis, not actually cut off, but remove it with magic.
 One of the accounts in Kramer & Sprenger’s book details the story of several witnesses to this very magic.

 “What shall we think about those witches who somehow take members in large numbers—twenty or thirty—and shut them up together in a birds’ nest or some box, where they move about like living members, eating oats or other feed? This has been seen by many and is a matter of common talk. It is said that it is all done by devil’s work and illusion, for the senses of those who see [the penises] are deluded in the way we have said.”

It is claimed that the witches would have up to thirty penises’ in a bird’s nest or box, all wriggling about, and would feed them oats and other grains, treating them as pets.
Kramer and Sprenger’s book was full of misogynist and preposterous accusations against women’s sexuality, that stems from their (and Medieval Christian Europe’s) infatuation and anxieties with women’s sexual desires, sexuality and place in the Bible. The whole basis of his book and accusation against female witches comes back to one passage which led to countless women being accused of witchcraft, and murdered across the world; “All witchcraft comes from carnal lust, which in women is insatiable.”

Headline from the Canberra Times
 Wednesday 8 November 1967, page 6
(link in the bibliography)

Koro, which is a psychological issue, has seen many mass waves of panic in the centuries since the Medieval Witch hunts. In 1967, Singapore was hit with a mass panic, when 454 men visited the Singapore General Hospital over a period of months.

 One of the Doctors who treated the men, stated afterwards that patients reported; “a sudden feeling of retraction of the penis into the abdomen with great fear that, should the retraction be permitted to proceed … the penis would disappear into the abdomen with a fatal outcome.”

The next mass penis-shrinkage-panic happened in China through 1984-1985. Over 3000 individual men were treated for Suo-Yang, weirdly, this time it also included a number of women reporting vulva, labia, nipple and breast shrinkage, or disappearance!

Africa has seen the most recent cases of Koro, with ten years between 1998 and 2008 seeing 56 separate cases. In these cases, the common complaint wasn’t shrinkage, but total loss of the penis. 36 people, accused of witchcraft, body part trading, or blackmail by penis-snatching were killed in the hysteria that followed accusations over the years.

Zionist Sorcery was apparently the cause of penis-loss in Sudan in 2003. In what was later revealed as an attempt to divert the people’s attention away from what was happening with the presidency.
In 2013, a stranger was visiting a small village in Tiringoulou, Central Africa, when he stopped for a drink. Upon handing the drink to the stranger the vendor suddenly screamed his penis had disappeared, this was soon followed by another villager. Other villagers claimed to see the two men’s penis shrink form adult size to baby size before their eyes! The visitor was duly arrested for sorcery and executed.

Despite the various claims of witchcraft, sorcery and female fox spirits in China stealing penis’s, believe it or not, koro in men and women has a psychological explanation. It would seem in society’s where a person’s reproductive ability helps determine a man’s self-worth, and worth to procreation in their society, are intrinsically connected to anxiety and fear, ethnicity and cultural belief, and political or socioeconomic tension.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018
https://www.facebook.com/TheHauntsOfAdelaide/

Bibliography

Mattelaer, Johan J, Jilek, Wolfgang (2007). “Koro?The Psychological Disappearance of the Penis”. The Journal of Sexual Medicine. 4 (5): 1509–1515. doi:10.1111/j.1743-6109.2007. 00586.x.
Smith, M., (2002). “The flying phallus and the laughing inquisitor: Penis theft in the ‘Malleus Maleficarum’”. Journal of Folklore Research An International Journal of Folklore and Ethnomusicology 39(1):85-117
Edwards, J. W., (1984). “Indigenous Koro, a Genital Retraction Syndrome of Insular Southeast Asia: A Critical Review”. Culture Medicine and Psychiatry 8(1):1-24 · April 1984. DOI: 10.1007/BF00053099
China-Underground. (2016). “Koro, shrinking genitals syndrome”, China-Underground, viewed 13 April 2018, https://china-underground.com/2016/05/14/koro-shrinking-genitals-syndrome/
1967 ‘SINGAPORE KORO ‘NOT THREAT TO MANHOOD”, The Canberra Times (ACT: 1926 – 1995), 8 November, p. 6. , viewed 27 Jul 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106981331