Tag Archives: The Haunts of Adelaide

Shot of Spirits: Episode 9: Exeter Hotel Adelaide. S.A.

 Shot of Spirits: Episode 9: Exeter Hotel Adelaide. S.A.




“On 18 November 1970 the body of the hotel’s owner, Mrs Joy Josephs, was found in the kitchen and a 30-year-old man trialled and sentenced for her murder. Years later, screams, sighs and a female voice of no known source are often reported as coming from the kitchen by hotel staff. “The Exeter’s reported paranormal occurrences predate Mrs Josephs’ murder, but she’s thought to be behind almost all the spooky goings-on alleged in the hotel today. “Disembodied footsteps and voices are frequently heard throughout all levels of the hotel, while the most often reported phenomena happen near the upstairs hallway where her bedroom used to be situated. “Another common disturbance is the moving of objects – often staff will place an item on a kitchen bench, only to find it’s been moved moments later!”

Read more about this haunting in The Haunts of Adelaide: Revised Edition:

Shot of Spirits: Episode 8: Estcourt House, Grange S.A

 Shot of Spirits: Ep.8: Estcourt House, Grange S.A.




Estcourt House was built at Grange (now Tennyson) in 1883 by Frederick and Rosa Bucknall, the house getting its name from Fred’s middle name ‘Estcourt’. Frederick had married into money, Rosa’s was the widow of beer baron Henry Haussen. Within 3 years Fred and Rosa were facing bankruptcy and had to sell. The AMP bought the house in 1886. In 1892, the James Brown Memorial Trust bought the house and set itself up to help disabled people. In 1931, the home became a TB and polio treatment centre for children run by the Salvation Army. In 1978, the State Government bought the house making it part of the Strathmont Centre. It is now privately owned. Estcourt House has long been alleged to be haunted, but what old house isn\’t? Are there ghosts within its walls? watch to find out… Read more about this haunting in the Haunts of Adelaide: Revised Edition https://www.amazon.com.au/Haunts-Adelaide-History-Mystery-Paranormal/dp/B08JLQLLC5

Allen Tiller at the Gawler Library 27 May 2021

 

Allen Tiller at the Gawler Library

Thursday 27th May
6:30 pm

Join Allen Tiller, one of Australia’s leading paranormal historian’s, as he introduces you to The Haunts of Adelaide.

About this Event

This second edition of The Haunts of Adelaide has been completely rewritten with extra historical facts, footnoting, an index, more photos, and most importantly, more ghost stories!

Allen will be discussing some of Adelaide’s most haunted locations and the history behind the buildings, the people, the urban legends and the ghosts that haunt Adelaide and its suburbs.

Allen was the recipient of the History Council of South Australia’s Emerging Historian of the Year Award 2017, and has also featured on the paranormal reality television show Haunting: Australia. He is a respected historian, paranormal researcher, author, poet, and the founder of Eidolon Paranormal, S.A. Paranormal, and The Haunts of Adelaide.

Allen will have books available for sale on the night.

Thomas Cunningham: Rogue and Vagabond (Part II)

 

Thomas Cunningham: Rogue and Vagabond (Part II)

  After serving two years in gaol for the abduction of 15-year-old girl Ellen Ween, Cunningham found himself living on Currie Street at Boddington Row in the company of a prostitute, Alice Tree. The pair were accused of unlawfully and maliciously wounding Ah Kong, a charge later dismissed. 

  Thomas Cunningham found himself in further trouble in 1882 when he faced court on the charge of being a ‘Rogue and Vagabond’. The charges were brought forth by Detective Dunlevi, who stated for the prior twelve months, Cunningham was unemployed and had been associating with thieves and prostitutes. He had served two years for abduction and had prior to that been charged and convicted for larceny, felonious assault, and assaulting police.

  Cunningham told the court he would find work on Wednesday. Sitting Judges, Beddome and Lucy allowed him to be released to do so.[1] Cunningham did not look for work, instead, he went about his usual business, drinking and gambling at the Shamrock Hotel, the Ship Inn, The Provincial Hotel, and the Galatea Hotel. Detective Hampton arrested Cunningham and again charged him as a Rogue and Vagabond.

  On 22 May 1882, Cunningham was brought before Judge Beddome. This time the Judge was not so lenient, sentencing Cunningham with two months imprisonment and two sureties to keep the peace at 50 pounds each.

  Cunningham was the charged with assaulting Police Officer Copeland. Officer Copeland stated that while trying to arrest Cunningham for the charge he sat previously, Cunningham turned and struck him in the eye. Judge Beddome sentenced Cunningham to a further six months in prison and hard labour.
Another man Edward Bates was charged alongside Cunningham, for inciting Cunningham to resist arrest. He was fined 1 pound and two 50-pound sureties to keep the peace for a year.
Yet another man, William Jury, was sentenced for assaulting police. Jury had seen the Constable arresting Cunningham and starting remonstrating with him to release Cunningham, in doing so, he kicked the officer several times. Jury was sentenced to six months in prison.[2]

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2020


[1] ‘Adelaide: Monday. May 1.’, Adelaide Observer, (6 May 1882), p. 12., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160157123. 
[2] ‘MONDAY, MAY 22.’, South Australian Weekly Chronicle, (27 May 1882), p. 13. , http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91467672

The Colourful and Tragic Life of Alice Tree: Part 2 – “Riotous Behaviour and Death.”

 

The Colourful and Tragic Life of Alice Tree: Part 2 – “Riotous Behaviour and Death.”

Alice Tree was certainly no angel, her long list of crimes, mainly theft and prostitution, made her an easy target for police patrolling the notoriously seedy area around the Shamrock Hotel in north-west Adelaide. Light Square, Currie Street, Rosina Street and Elizabeth Street were all known hotspots for opium dens, prostitution, and other serious crimes.

In 1875, Alice Tree was fined 20 shillings for loitering with her friend Matilda Lattin.[1]

November 1878, 21-year-old Alice Tree and 23-year-old Francis Major are found guilty of stealing 19 pounds from Robert McKinnon at the home of W.R. Evans.[2]

January 1879, Alice Tree, Annie Kelly, and Mary Ann Young were charged with behaving in a riotous manner in Light Square but were acquitted.[3]
October 1879, Alice Tree, Georgina Aslee, and Mary Minchin were charged with riotous behaviour while in a cab. Fined 10s each.[4]
November 1879, and Miss tree and her cohorts find themselves in trouble with the law once again. This time Alice Tree, Elizabeth Hillman and Elizabeth Alderson was charged with ‘riotous conduct in a public conveyance in Rundle Street’, the ladies were fined 10s each. Another young lady, in the company of the three women, Mary Ann Gearing was fined 10s for indecent behaviour at the same hearing.[5]

In January 1880, Alice Tree with charged with stealing the pocket watch of Francis Major. At court, Major stated he got out of gaol on December 27th, 1879 and met Tree at the Phoenix Hotel. Tree stole his watch, but he later went home with the prostitute. The court dismissed the case.[6]

On 9 November 1882 Constables Lucas and Donahue were walking the beat in Adelaide. The police officers were walking down Currie Street when they stopped at the house of known prostitute Alive Tree. Through Tree’s window at Boddington’s Cottages, they could see a man holding Tree with one hand, while his other hand was raised in a fist about to strike her. The man said to Tree. “Stop it now, or I’ll do for you yet!”[7]
Donahue called out to the man to stop what he was doing. The argument stopped for a few minutes but commenced again. Again, Donahue called out to the man to stop. The man replied, “it’s all right bobby,” and the fighting stopped. The constables waited ten more minutes, and as the fighting had stopped, continued walking their beat.

On 10 November 1882, Constable Holmes was on duty at the Light Square police station when he was called to attend an address on Currie Street. When he arrived, he found Constable Pascoe in attendance at the home. Pascoe and Holmes then inspected the body the naked Alice Tree, who was lying on her bed, dead, but still warm.
They inspected her body under candlelight and discovered bruising on her face and other areas of her body. A woman from across the street spoke to the police and told them she had seen a man strike the woman with a glass and a bottle.
When Constable Pascoe had arrived, Henry Page, who lived with Tree, had run off to find a doctor. He did not return. Constable Holmes went in search of Page and found him in Morphett Street. Page told him he had gone in search of a doctor, tried three, but none would come back to Currie Street with him. Holmes took Page into custody and took him to the Light Square station and made a report, he then returned to the Currie Street address with Detective Burchell.

The detective found broken chairs in Tree’s room. There was dried blood on the wall near where Tree and Page had been arguing the night before. Several towels and handkerchiefs were found soaked with blood. Other blood-stained items were found throughout the house, as well as broken bottles and glass covered with blood.

Dr Melville R.H. Jay was called upon to conduct a post-mortem examination on the body of Alice Tree at the Destitute Asylum. Jay discovered bruising on the face, left breast, shoulder, arm and forearm. He could find no external signs of injury on her head but found a large blood clot covering the left side of her brain.[8]

During an inquest into the death, witnesses were called. Thomas O’Neil had been drinking at the house on the Friday in question with Henry Page and another woman. Page told him that he and Tree had been fighting the night before. O’Neil had seen Tree lying in her room, and figured she was asleep. He had tried to wake her, but she did not move, so he told Page to go get help.
the next witness was Tree’s friend Petrea Larsen. Larsen had seen Tree after she had been beaten by Page and tried to reduce the swelling on her eye. Larsen declared that she had previously heard Page say to Tree that he would kill her before her ex-partner, Cunningham, got out of gaol.

Emily Harris, who also shared the house with Tree and Page, deposed that she had seen Page throw Tree against a hard, wooden box on the floor. She also stated that Tree had told her, that Page had previously beaten Tree down, then jumped on her as she lay on the floor.

A neighbour, Maude Wenden gave evidence that she had seen Page strike Tree on the nose, but it had not knocked her down. She put forward that Tree aggravated Page, implying she deserved the treatment. Wenden had heard a woman’s scream on Friday morning at about 11:30 am. She checked on Tree, but saw her laying on her bed asleep, so let her be.

The jury delivered the verdict; “That the deceased, Alice Tree, came to her death through injuries received from the ill-treatment of Henry Page and they found Henry Page guilty of manslaughter.[9]

On 15 December 1882, Henry Page was brought before the South Australian Supreme Court charged with manslaughter. Page, who had no lawyer, pleaded not guilty to the charges. Evidence was presented by the police prosecutor, including a statement by O’Neil, who failed to show up to the hearing. Evidence from Ah Kong was put forward, that he had heard O’Neil at the previous inquest hearing, state to Page that he need not fear the hearing, as he would not speak of what he had seen.
The Judge asked Page if he would like to give evidence, but told him if he was sworn in, he would be cross-examined. Page opted to offer a statement instead; denying he had ever struck Tree with any weapon and protesting that he did not inflict the wounds that killed the 25-year-old woman.

The Jury, on the advice of the Judge that the evidence was insufficient that Page had caused the death of Alice Tree delivered a verdict of Not Guilty. Page was discharged and allowed to go free.[10]

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2020.

[1] ‘THIS DAY.’, The Express and Telegraph, (19 November 1875), p. 2., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208179784.

[2] ‘LAW COURTS.’, The Express and Telegraph, (13 November 1878), p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207583525.

[3] ‘POLICE COURTS.’, South Australian Register, (30 January 1879), p. 1., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42979251.

[4] ‘LAW COURTS. POLICE COURT—ADELAIDE.’, The Express and Telegraph, (4 October 1879), p. 2., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207656009.

[5] ‘POLICE COURTS.’, South Australian Register, (1 November 1879), p. 1., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43099341.

[6] ‘TUESDAY, JANUARY 6.’, South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail, (10 January 1880), p. 22., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article95041481.

[7] ‘CORONER’S INQUEST.’, Evening Journal, (13 November 1882), p. 2., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197777811.

[8] ‘LATE TELEGRAMS.’, Kapunda Herald, (14 November 1882), p. 3., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106570341.

[9] ‘DEATH UNDER SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES.’, South Australian Weekly Chronicle, (18 November 1882), p. 7., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93130681.

[10] ‘SUPREME COURT – CRIMINAL SITTINGS.’, South Australian Register (16 December 1882), p. 2.http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43340939

The Colourful and Tragic Life of Alice Tree: Part 1

 

The Colourful and Tragic Life of Alice Tree: Part 1 

 

Alice Tree was a prostitute working from Boddington Row in Adelaide’s West End. Boddington’s Row was a small group of cottages alongside the Shamrock Hotel (Colonel Light Hotel) that Thomas Boddington, owner of the Shamrock Hotel leased at inflated prices to prostitutes who frequented his hotel.

July 1881, Alice Tree and her partner, Thomas Cunningham, a labourer, was arrested by police on the evidence of Ah Kong, that Cunningham had maliciously wounded him.

 Ah Kong had sold a jacket to Alice Tree, he went to her house on Currie Street to collect his payment. Cunningham opened the door to Kong, but would not let him inside, saying to Kong, “I will come out and kill you.”
 Cunningham then rushed at Kong and punched him in the face. Tree then rushed outside and struck Kong over the head with a pot stick, knocking him unconscious to the ground.
 A passing police constable noticed Kong on the ground a little while later and sent him to the hospital where he was treated. Once he gained consciousness, Kong told police what had happened.
 Detective Webster arrested Cunningham and Tree on Clarendon Street. Cunningham said to Tree, “I suppose we shall be committed for this, Alice”. The two prisoners made no further statements and were bailed at court, on the surety of 50 pounds each, and two others in 85 pounds each.[1]

 

Cunningham and Tree appeared in court in August charged with unlawfully and maliciously wounding Ah Kong on 9 July 1881. Ah Kong, on the witness stand, gave an entirely different account of what happened on the day.
 Kong stated that Alice Tree owed him money for drapery, so he went to her house to ask for the goods back. Cunningham was there and told Tree to stay inside. He claimed Cunningham used threats and bad language, then Tree hit him with a stick shouting “Kill the Chinaman!”
 Kong claimed he fell to the ground and Cunningham seized him by the throat, and asked Tree for a knife, with the intentioned to slit his throat, that was when Tree struck Kong over the head.
 He claimed another man came to his rescue, and as he (Kong) escaped, he fell to the ground unconscious, only to wake up in the hospital.
 At this point, Kong was stopped and examined. It was revealed that Kong had arrived at Tree’s house brandishing a tomahawk and threatened to use it if Tree did not pay him.[2]
 

 The Police Court decided that as Kong\’s evidence could not be relied upon, that the case should be dismissed. The Judge agreed and acquitted them both.[3]

 

Next week:

The Colourful and Tragic Life of Alice Tree: “Riotous Behaviour and Death.”

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2020

[1] \’WEDNESDAY, JULY 13.\’, South Australian Weekly Chronicle (16 July 1881), p. 13., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91284912.
[2] \’Law and Criminal Courts.\’, Evening Journal, (13 July 1881), p. 2., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197757550.
[3] \’LAW COURTS. SUPREME COURT—CRIMINAL SITTINGS\’, The Express and Telegraph, (4 August 1881), p. 2., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208192678.

The Colourful and Tragic Life of Alice Tree: Part 1 – “Kill the Chinaman!”

 

The Colourful and Tragic Life of Alice Tree: Part 1 – “Kill the Chinaman!”

 

Alice Tree was a prostitute working from Boddington Row in Adelaide’s West End. Boddington’s Row was a small group of cottages alongside the Shamrock Hotel (Colonel Light Hotel) that Thomas Boddington, owner of the Shamrock Hotel leased at inflated prices to prostitutes who frequented his hotel.

July 1881, Alice Tree and her partner, Thomas Cunningham, a labourer was arrested by police on the evidence of Ah Kong, that Cunningham had maliciously wounded him.

 Ah Kong had sold a jacket to Alice Tree, he went to her house on Currie Street to collect his payment. Cunningham opened the door to Kong, but would not let him inside, saying to Kong, “I will come out and kill you.”
 Cunningham then rushed at Kong and punched him in the face. Tree then rushed outside and struck Kong over the head with a pot stick, knocking him unconscious to the ground.
 A passing police constable noticed Kong on the ground a little while later and sent him to the hospital where he was treated. Once he gained consciousness, Kong told police what had happened.
 Detective Webster arrested Cunningham and Tree on Clarendon Street. Cunningham said to Tree, “I suppose we shall be committed for this, Alice”. The two prisoners made no further statements and were bailed at court, on the surety of 50 pounds each, and two others in 85 pounds each.[1]

 

Cunningham and Tree appeared in court in August charged with unlawfully and maliciously wounding Ah Kong on 9 July 1881. Ah Kong, on the witness stand, gave an entirely different account of what happened on the day.
 Kong stated that Alice Tree owed him money for drapery, so he went to her house to ask for the goods back. Cunningham was there and told Tree to stay inside. He claimed Cunningham used threats and bad language, then Tree hit him with a stick shouting “Kill the Chinaman!”
 Kong claimed he fell to the ground and Cunningham seized him by the throat, and asked Tree for a knife, with the intentioned to slit his throat, that was when Tree struck Kong over the head.
 He claimed another man came to his rescue, and as he (Kong) escaped, he fell to the ground unconscious, only to wake up in the hospital.
 At this point, Kong was stopped and examined. It was revealed that Kong had arrived at Tree’s house brandishing a tomahawk and threatened to use it if Tree did not pay him.[2]
 

 The Police Court decided that as Kong’s evidence could not be relied upon, that the case should be dismissed. The Judge agreed and acquitted them both.[3]

 

Next week:

The Colourful and Tragic Life of Alice Tree: “Riotous Behaviour and Death.”

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2020

[1] ‘WEDNESDAY, JULY 13.’, South Australian Weekly Chronicle (16 July 1881), p. 13., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91284912.
[2] ‘Law and Criminal Courts.’, Evening Journal, (13 July 1881), p. 2., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197757550.
[3] ‘LAW COURTS. SUPREME COURT—CRIMINAL SITTINGS’, The Express and Telegraph, (4 August 1881), p. 2., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208192678.

The Haunts of Adelaide: History, Mystery and the Paranormal: REVISED EDITION

The Haunts of Adelaide: History, Mystery and the Paranormal
REVISED EDITION

The Haunts of Adelaide: Revised Edition, (BOOK + KINDLE) is now live at Amazon.com.au​ in traditional book form!!!
The Haunts of Adelaide: History, Mystery and the Paranormal is researched and written by award-winning historian, Allen Tiller.
This second edition of The Haunts of Adelaide has been completely rewritten with extra historical facts, footnoting, an index, more photos, and most importantly, more ghost stories!
Join Allen Tiller, one of Australia’s leading paranormal historian’s, as he documents some of Adelaide’s most haunted locations and the history behind the buildings, the people, the urban legends and the ghosts that haunt Adelaide and its suburbs, in this completely revised and rewritten edition.
Inside you will discover the ghosts that dwelled at Graham’s Castle, Younghusband Mansion, The Adelaide Arcade, and Waterfall Gully. Find out the truth behind Schneider’s Alley and the read about the tiger of the Union Hotel!

Get spooked with 30 stories from the other side: The Haunts of Adelaide: History, Mystery, and the Paranormal: REVISED EDITION

Phineas Philip Davies (31 March 1865 – 28 Dec 1885)

Phineas Philip Davies (31 March 1865 – 28 Dec 1885)

Commemoration Day, December 28th, 1885. The South Australian Colony’s only warship, the HMS Protector was sitting off the coast at Glenelg, awaiting to fire its guns in salute to the forty-ninth year of the settlement of the colony.

 It was the first time the HMS Protector had been allowed to fire its guns in salute.
 The canons fired five times, then suddenly, the ship’s flags were lowered and it steamed of towards Port Adelaide.
 Onboard, the crews were in full medical mode. The canons had fired, but something had gone wrong, and two crew members were seriously injured.
 Daniel Cann, in charge of canon number 5 was severely maimed by an explosion of the canon and was sent to Semaphore Hospital. He survived the explosion but lost an eye and was disfigured.

 Phineas Philip Davies, on the other hand, had received the full force of the blast from the cannon breech and died on board the ship.
An inquest was held on Tuesday the 29th of December 1884 at the Largs Pier Hotel by the city coroner Mr T. Ward.  The Coroner and Jury were taken to the warship to inspect the gun. Sitting alongside the gun was the coffin and body of Davies.
 Master Gunner Haisom explained to the audience how the gun works, and then what they believed went wrong.

Haisom explained that Davies was positioned at gun 5, position two. Haisom had himself gone around to every gun and supplied each with a bucket of water to sponge out the excess gunpowder after each firing. He then informed the gunners they had 50 seconds to reload after each firing.

 At 12 o’clock they began to fire the guns.
The number 5 gun fired two rounds, with its crew, including Davies, preparing for shot three. Davies entered the charge, which exploded on contact. Davies had neglected to sponge the gun after the last firing, leaving lit residue in the canon, which exploded the new 10 Lb powder charge.
 Davies gun commander, Daniel Canns, was subsequently accused of not delivering the order to sponge the canon between shots, something that was standard procedure.
 The jury deliberated on the evidence for quite some time, but in the end, delivered a verdict of accidental death.

The remains of Protector at Heron Island in 2008 at low tide


A memorial was erected to Davies at Cheltenham Cemetery and was claimed by the Royal Australian Navy in December 1986. The Memorial to Davies was installed as the headpiece of the South Australian Naval Memorial Garden at H.M.A.S. Encounter until the memorial was relocated to its current position in April 1995.





Front Inscription

Sacred to the Memory
of
PHINEAS PHILIP DAVIES,
A.B. H.M.C.S. PROTECTOR. 
Killed By Premature Explosion
Of A Cartridge When Firing Salute
At Glenelg Commemoration Day 
28th DECEMBER 1885. 
Aged 20.
Erected By His Shipmates
And Naval Reserve

Plaque: 

This tombstone marked the site of the
grave of Phineas Davies in Cheltenham
Cemetery for 100 years and was claimed
by the Royal Australian Navy in December
1986. It was installed as the headpiece of
the South Australian Naval Memorial
Garden at HMAS ENCOUNTER until the
Garden was relocated to its present site
in April 1995.

(Note: Phineas Philip Davies was born on the 31st of March 1865 in Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand)

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018
Bibliography


1885 ‘CORONERS’ INQUESTS’, South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA: 1839 – 1900), 30 December, p. 7. , viewed 02 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article44536720

1885 ‘The Fatal Accident on the Protector.’, The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA: 1867 – 1922), 30 December, p. 5. (Afternoon Edition.), viewed 02 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208372973

1885 ‘THE-FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE PROTECTOR.’, The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA: 1858 – 1889), 30 December, p. 6. , viewed 02 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36320103

Adelaide (S.A.). Corporation 2003, Historical walking trails, Adelaide, South Australia, City of Adelaide, Adelaide

Ancestry.com. Australia, Death Index, 1787-1985 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

Madeleine Ryan, History SA, ‘Naval Memorial’, SA History Hub, History Trust of South Australia, http://sahistoryhub.com.au/things/naval-memorial, accessed 2 March 2018.


Scott, Jenny, 2012, Davies, Phineas Phillip, The State Library of South Australia, 2 March 2018, https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/B+72767

The Haunts of Adelaide – Book

The Haunts of Adelaide – Book

Published by CUSTOM BOOK Publications It has always been Allen Tiller’s aim to provide factual insight into haunted locations in Adelaide, and indeed, the rest of Australia. He lifts the veil on ghost stories and reveals the truth behind the myths and tales that so often become an urban legend and local folklore. His mission is to research the historical facts of locations, people, places and buildings – from a distinctly paranormal perspective. The Haunts of Adelaide was born…
Buy The Haunts of Adelaide –