Tag Archives: hotel

A Haunting at the Cornucopia Hotel – Wallaroo

A Haunting at the Cornucopia Hotel – Wallaroo

 

This month we are travelling to the Copper Coast to the historic mining seaside town of Wallaroo to visit one of my favourite haunts in the area – the Cornucopia Hotel, located at 40 Owen Terrace, right in the heart of the historic town.

The Copper Coast Hotel was built circa 1862 and first licensed to Mr R Hazelgrove.

 The hotel, boasting 52 rooms, was built in 1862 and was first licensed by Mr R Hazelgrove. It was the central meeting point in the town and had a purpose-built dance hall upstairs. It is the only hotel in Wallaroo to still retain its original opening name, having never been called anything other than “Cornucopia Hotel”.
 It was also home, in the early days, like many hotels in that era, as the staging point for coroner inquests into local deaths. Often this would see the body laid out, with Doctors, Judges and other local dignitaries sitting around deciding if there was more to a death then an accident or natural causes.

 I have investigated the hotel on a number of occasions, both privately and with the public, and have encountered some very strange phenome within its walls.
 The upstairs section of the hotel houses the guest’s suites and shared shower facilities. This seems to be the epicentre of the haunting, particularly in the one wing containing bedrooms 11 through to 13.
 On one occasion, about the middle of the day, I was standing in the junction of the hallways, which wind and turn through the upper levels. In one spot I could smell very distinctly the smell of the ocean and old tobacco, but take a step in any direction and the smell would be completely gone. Now, not being one to jump to the “ghost” conclusion in an instant, I put it down to being so close to the ocean, and the smell of tobacco being embedded in the walls and carpets, and didn’t think any more of it, until I went downstairs to the dining room and a psychic told me that right above us was a spirit of an old Swedish sailor who had died elsewhere, but returned here as he felt this was home – (this still did not convince me the place is haunted by a Swedish sailor!).

 On another occasion, my wife experienced very strange disembodied footsteps in the hallway whilst she was investigating in room 10, at the same time, I was sitting on the bed in room 11 and recorded an EVP that asked the question “Hello?” – this was only the beginning of weird occurrences in the upstairs area that evening,
 Whilst in another upstairs room we all experienced equipment responses to questions. One investigator also heard a disembodied voice within the room.
 During a public event in the Cornucopia Hotel, Rob from “Cityside Paranormal” had a poltergeist event occur. Rob and his partner was staying in room 11, he put his clothes and gear in the room, and during the tour part of the event, re-entered his room to find all his belongings were strewn about the place as if someone had been recklessly searching for some mysterious object!

 So who haunts the Cornucopia Hotel? It could be Archibald Samuels, a young man, aged 14, who lost his life in a water tank that is located directly underneath the current bear garden. Archibald had gone to draw water from the tank and somehow fell in, only to be found the following day when the hotel couldn’t find him to run an errand.

 Or, perhaps it might be Mr Crawford, who had a nasty gash upon his leg that went gangrene, he died in an upstairs bedroom.
 Many of the staff have told me stories of suicides that go unreported in the local media, one involved a young woman hanging herself from the balcony in full site of the town’s main street – it is said she may be the ghost often heard speaking in room 9, that also likes the roll bars of soap across the room.

Another mysterious paranormal event occurred in February 1894 when a fire broke out in the hotel stables (as reported in The Kadina and Wallaroo Times – 3 Feb 1894).  Albert Swanski, the horse keeper locked the stables at 11pm, and when he checked the horses at 7:30am, he found the stalls and horses very badly burnt, so badly, in fact, the vet put them down immediately (they are buried in the hotel grounds). All the leather bridles, reigns etc of the horses were perfect, uncharred, no fire or smoke damage. No one knew how the fire started, or how it got put out, all the locks were still intact, and no entry points could be seen – very strange indeed!

 

The Cornucopia Hotel Wallaroo remains a popular drinking spot within the town and depending on who you talk too, one of the most haunted pubs on the Copper Coast!

My thanks to Rick and Will Parson of Flinders Ranges Paranormal Research Group for assistance with research on this historic location.

The Cornucopia Hotel is now known as the Copper Coast Hotel.

Allen Tiller is the Australian star of the international hit television show “Haunting: Australia” and author of “The Haunts of Adelaide – History, Mystery and the Paranormal” as well as being a historian, lecturer, poet, musician, Tour Guide, blogger and podcaster. Allen is also a volunteer for many different associations and groups.

You can find Allen online at:

http://www.twitter.com/Allen_Tiller

http://www.facebook.com/AllenHauntingAustralia

https://www.facebook.com/TheHauntsOfAdelaide

First published in MEGAscene issue 7 2016

© Allen Tiller

A Haunting at the Tea Tree Gully Hotel

A Haunting at the Tea Tree Gully Hotel

1884 -SLSA: B 8076

The Tea Tree Gully Hotel was the third hotel to open in the area. It opened in March 1854, and for a short time between 1937 until 1954, it was known as The Euston Hotel.
 Originally the road through the area crossed the front of the Highercombe Hotel, and travellers would stop there for the night. This caused the Tea Tree Gully Hotel to be disadvantaged in money making opportunities, which led to the hotel having 14 owners in 20 years.
 That all that changed when the road to Adelaide was diverted, and the Tea Tree Gully hotel gained the customer lodging by now facing the main road. This loss saw the Highercombe Hotel shut its doors due to poor patronage.
 Underneath the Tea Tree Gully Hotel is the original living quarters of the hotel owners and staff. This is the area alleged to be most haunted with workers becoming paranoid they are being followed or watched.
  Some staff have claimed to have had their names called out whilst locking up the hotel, with others claiming to smell sweet odours in areas that usually smell sour or ‘off’. There are claims of machines and televisions turning on and off by themselves, and loud, mysterious bangs heard throughout the hotel.
  The most often seen ghost is that of a young girl dressed in white, which ties in with what Mr Gibblens of the Highercombe Hotel saw in their meeting room. The young girl has been seen in the bathroom of the Tea Tree gully lying on the floor sobbing. No-one is sure who she might have been, or why she haunts the hotel
The hotel is known today as The Gully Public House and Garden.
© 2019 Allen Tiller
Bibliography
‘A Brief History’, Tea Tree Gully Hotel (2019), https://www.thegullyphg.com.au/a-brief-history
‘A Short History’, Tea Tree Gully & District Historical Society, (2019), http://ttghistoricalsociety.org.au/history/history-of-ttg/

Closed Hotels of South Australia: The College Arms Hotel. (Cnr. Currie & Rosina Streets.)

Closed Hotels of South Australia: The College Arms Hotel. (Cnr. Currie & Rosina Streets.)

Situated on the corner of Currie Street and Rosina Street, the Coronation Hotel was established in 1846 as the Golden Fleece Inn. From 1871 until 1937, the hotel was known as The Crown Inn, from 1937 until 1979 it was known as The Coronation Hotel. From 1979 until 1984 it was known as Hotel California, and from 1984 until 1987 it was known as Armstrong’s Tavern. Its last incarnation was as The College Arms Hotel when it was run in conjunction with the TAFE-SA.

  The hotel was opened by Andrew Harriot in 1846, who leased the hotel in 1848 to Donald Stewart. Stewart didn’t see out the year before he sold hotel lease to William Gardener. Gardener on-sold to Francis Bunn in 1850 who kept the hotel until 1854. The next lessee was James Robinson who in 1855 sold the lease back to Andrew Harriot.

  The hotel was sold to Goodman Hart in 1860 who operated it until 1862. The next two lessees were female, Margaret Dymond: 1860-1862, and Mary Ann Richards from 1862 until 1866. Three more Lessee’s took the hotel (Charles Mallen: 1866-1867, Robert Poole: 1867-1868 and Joseph Backhouse: 1868-1869) before Goodman Hart retook his lease from 1869 until 1871.
From 1871 until 1937 the hotel had another 34 publicans – you can find a list of all publicans here: https://localwiki.org/adelaide-hills/Adelaide_Hotels_-_Currie_Street

The Crown Inn – 1918. SLSA B84 

  The hotel changed its name in 1937 under the ownership of Elise Maude McKeown to The Coronation Hotel. In the next few years, the hotel was constantly in the news for all the wrong reasons. Publicans were caught selling alcohol illegally after hours, and bar staff and patrons were caught betting illegally by the undercover Police Gaming Squad.

  The Coronation Hotel was also at the centre of a legal case in 1939 when under the ownership of Daniel Kenny. Kenny had challenged in court the legality of Ballroom dancing to be held in South Australian hotels. The law at the time stated that for dancing to occur in a hotel, the licensee had to have written permission from two Justices of the Peace, one of whom must be the Commissioner, a superintendent, inspector or sub-inspector of the South Australian Police.
Kenny lost the case when Justice Muirhead found it illegal. During an appeal the following year, it was revealed that other hotels in the vicinity were allowed to hold dancing. Lawyer for Kenny, Mr Travers equated the allowing of one hotel, over another to hold dances as an act of: “one law for the rich and another for the poor”.
 Due to the stresses of the court case and the constant harassment of police, Kenny sold his lease to Joseph Kilgariff in 1940.

The Coronation Hotel – circa 1966. SLSA: B16356 

 In 1979, the hotel rebranded as the Hotel California, a discotheque featuring a raised DJ box above the dance floor. From 1984 until 1987 it was known as Armstrong’s Tavern which was considered a safe hotel for the local gay community. From 1987 it was known as The College Arms Hotel and was used to train TAFE students. The hotel was demolished to make way for an update to the Adelaide TAFE-SA campus.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2019


Sources:

ADELAIDE POLICE NOT INTELLIGENCE OFFICER, POLICE SAY’, The Advertiser, (21 March 1940), p. 7.
‘Obtained Liquor After Hours’, The Advertiser, (3 February 1939), p. 30.
‘ADELAIDE POLICE’, The Advertiser, (16 January 1940), p. 6
‘’Put-and-Take Players Fined 5/’, The News, (30 November 1942), p.5.
‘ADELAIDE POLICE’, The Advertiser, (2 July 1946), p. 5.
‘BARMAN TO PAY £42’, News, (7 June 1950), p. 2.
‘Four Men Fined For Liquor Offences’, News, (2 February 1939), p. 16.
‘MAGISTRATE RULES HOTEL DANCING IS ILLEGAL’, News, (28 November 1939), p. 7.
‘DANCING IN HOTEL’, News, (15 January 1940), p. 8.
‘ADELAIDE POLICE’, The Advertiser, (16 January 1940), p. 6.

The Salisbury Hotel

The Salisbury Hotel

Salisbury Hotel circa 1882
   Opening originally as the New Road Inn, the Salisbury Hotel was built by John Harvey the founder of Salisbury Township. It was the first hotel in the township and was situated on the only road that led to a bridge over the Para River. Harvey had designed his new town, and a new road to lead people away from the Main North Road, back through Salisbury.
 This hotel was used for meetings that decided much of Salisbury’s future. Local laws and legislation were decided here, local council formation, the location of Mills, Post Offices and even how the train line would pass through the township were all decided in this hotel.

 Usually, I write about spooky stuff, ghosts, hauntings, etc, but in this case, I couldn’t find any local legends or ghost stories associated with this hotel. I spoke to the current publican of the hotel very recently, and she assures me this hotel Is not haunted, however, it has some interesting history, including the story of an inquest into the suicide death of Scottish immigrant James Carstairs.

Salisbury Hotel 2019 – Allen Tiller
   On the 14th of Oct 1854, James Carstairs, known locally as ‘Scotch James’, hung himself a bedroom of the Birchall family home. Evidence at trial indicated that Carstairs had been overseeing the kitchen of the Birchall farm. During that time, he had gotten Fanny, the 16-year daughter of Mr Birchall pregnant. When Fanny’s father heard of her condition, he left the vowing never to return. This, it is claimed led to Carstairs suicide.

 On the day in questions. Carstairs woke at 6am went into the kitchen, lit the fire and set the kettle on the stove. He then left and went back to his room.
 At 7am, Elizabeth Birchall (Fanny’s sister) and another staff member, Elizabeth Symes awoke. For whatever reason, the girls peered through Carstairs window and could see him standing motionless behind the door. The two women called out to him, but he did not react or reply. They called over My Symes and Mr Munday who went to check on Carstairs. They found he had hung himself with a very thick rope.
 

Salisbury Hotel circa 1890

Fanny Evett, during the inquest, claimed she had only ever had consensual sex with Carstairs, however, she had been raped in her fathers front garden, but stated in court, she was already pregnant at the time. She was unmarried, and had never told Carstairs the child was his, nor pressured him for marriage.

 Carstairs body was cut down by Mr Webb and placed on a couch until a doctor arrived to examine it. Carstairs body was then moved to the New Road Inn for an inquest. No Judge could be found in the area to preside over the inquest.
  It took two full days for a mounted constable to search for someone to hold the inquest. Otto Schomburgk J.P. eventually presided over the inquest, but, in the meantime, Carstairs body had come to decompose.

 The inquest into the suicide of Scotch James was the first held in the New Road Inn. Later the same year, 1854, the hotel changed its name to the Salisbury Hotel.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2019

Sources:
 ‘CORONER’S INQUEST AT SALISBURY.’, Adelaide Observer, (28 October 1854), p. 11.

‘CORONER’S INQUEST AT SALISBURY. —SUICIDE.’, Adelaide Times. (26 October 1854), p. 3.

Shields, Brian P 1983, History of Salisbury, Salisbury Public Library Service, Salisbury

‘SOMETHING DISGRACEFUL.’, Adelaide Times, (18 October 1854), p. 2

 ‘CORONER’S INQUEST AT SALISBURY.’, South Australian Register, (26 October 1854), p. 3.

Buckerfield’s Mill Inn

Buckerfield’s Mill Inn



The earliest records of the Mill Inn on the corner of Adelaide Road and Seventh Street Gawler South are from 1858, with the hotel license being registered to Mr H.W. Buckerfield in 1859. Buckerfield’s Mill Inn, as it became known, was a very popular drinking venue in the town, and also known for having 1st class accommodation. Buckerfield added stockyards to his substantial property in 1864.
 Buckerfields Mill Inn was known in Gawler as the home of sporting events. It sponsored many local horse races, sprinting races at Goose Island, and Rifle Shooting competitions.
Buckerfield sold the hotel to Mr C Woltmann in 1866, and from then on it changed hands another 24 times until 1920 when its liquor license was finally withdrawn.
In 1882, 48-year-old Charles Daniels, left the Mill Inn to walk across the Mill Bridge, only to be struck down by the 10:30 pm horse-drawn tram from the Gawler Railway Station. Daniels injuries were substantial after being crushed by the tram’s wheels, and he died not long after the accident.
In 1904, while under the license of Edward Maher, local life assurance agent, Percy Webb committed suicide in the hotels’ stables. In 1907, William Thomas was charged with causing a disturbance at the hotel for getting very drunk and not being able to pay his bill. For using indecent language against the arresting officer, he received 14 days in her Majesty’s Adelaide Gaol! Two other patrons, Mr and Mrs Yeomen were fined for obstructing police.
 Also, in 1970, 19-year-old William Goldney, who was riding his bike across the Mill Bridge, was clipped by a horse and trap. Goldney was taken to the Mill Inn where he died from his injuries two hours later.
In 1920 the hotel closed its doors for the final time. A large auction was held to sell the hotels goods, which attracted a large crowd.
From 1923 the former Mill Inn became the home of Mrs Broadstock, and during the 1960s, it became a deli. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, it became a Vincentian Centre, part of the St Vincent DePaul Society
Most recently Hyde and Partners have renovated the building and neighbouring house and created their Medical Centre.


 Correction: In the video, I refer to W.H. Buckerfield as being the first owner of the hotel when in fact it was H.W. Buckerfield that owned it.
 William Henry Buckerfield owned the Angaston Hotel, and his son Henry William Buckerfield owned the Mill Inn, Gawler.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2019

A Haunting at The Blumberg Hotel – Birdwood

A Haunting at The Blumberg Hotel – Birdwood

Birdwood, home to the National Motor Museum, was once known as Blumberg, but due to anti-German sentiment during World War One, it and many other South Australian towns had their names.
The name Birdwood comes from Sir William Birdwood who commanded ANZACS at Gallipoli.

The Blumberg Hotel originally opened as the Napoleon Bonaparte Hotel in 1865.

The hotel is thought to be haunted by a little girl dubbed “Emily”. It is believed Emily fell down the stairs and broke her neck. Emily is said to cause all kinds of mischief around the hotel, stealing salt and pepper shakers, turning on and off lights, and causing cold spots and cold draughts throughout the pub.

A former publican of the hotel also claimed that Emily the ghost would sit with her children and watch TV and would sometimes move chairs around in their presence.

Another spirit said to haunt the hotel is an adult that appears in the form of a shadow. One witness claim that the ghost walked through him. Others claim that at times the smell of death wafts through the hotel. On other occasions, it is the smell of incense, even though none has been lit.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2019
References:

Chirp Internet. 2016. Hotels in Birdwood < South Australia | Gday Pubs – Enjoy our Great Australian Pubs. [ONLINE] Available at http://www.gdaypubs.com.au/SA/birdwood.html. [Accessed 12 September 2016].

1871 ‘Family Notices’, South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA: 1839 – 1900), 20 May, p. 8. (Supplement to the South Australia Register.), viewed 02 Jan 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39246196

1907 ‘OBITUARY.’, The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA: 1880 – 1954), 13 September, p. 2. , viewed 02 Jan 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147866222

Baby in Water Closet – Colonist Tavern, Norwood.

Baby in Water Closet – Colonist Tavern, Norwood.


A newly born male baby, weighing 7 pounds, was found in the water closet (toilet) of the Colonist Inn on the Parade Norwood, in 1880. During the newborns autopsy, held by Dr Verco, it was revealed that child had been born recently, but was mostly likely a still born, as the child had never tried to breath. However, if the mother had of been with a mid-wife, there was evidence the child would have lived.
An inquest into the death was held at Destitute Asylum on Kermode Street in Adelaide, by the City Coroner where details of how the baby came to be in the toilet were revealed. 
Mary Hand, an inn servant revealed that a young lady named Ellen MacNamara visited the Old Colonist Inn on May 17th, 1880. Helen claimed to be very tired and went to bed without dinner.
 The next day, Ellen helped Mary with some of her work, but collapsed. Mary helped her as best she could, and after dinner that night, did not see Ellen again to the following day at 9am.
 That morning Ellen told Mary she had soiled the bedsheets and would wash them out and hang them herself. Ellen washed the sheet but left them in the soaking in the water. Before leaving, Ellen told Mary that she was planning to travel out to the country.
That evening, Mary went into Ellens room to tidy up and found that there were bloodied clothes, and blood on the mattress. She reported the soiled mattress to her bosses Mr and Mrs Bern.
 Mr Bern notified the local police, that he believed a child may have been born in his hotel.
As more details emerged, it was revealed that Ellen MacNamara claimed that she had become pregnant to Sidney George Gilbert, who was a butcher living at Government Gums. Gilberts mother, Ann was called as a witness, and she revealed that Helen had visited her house, saying she was pregnant to her son Sidney.
 Mrs Gilbert took the young girl in as she felt the girl might need some care. In the mean time she wrote to her son asking about Ellen and the chances of her being pregnant to him.
Sidney outright denied getting Ellen pregnant, but Mrs Gilbert allowed the girl to stay with her for 11 weeks, and in that time collected some children’s clothing for unborn child.
 It was revealed to Mrs Gilbert during that 11 weeks, that Ellen did not like, nor want children.
 The reason Ellen left the care of the Gilbert family was revealed. She had been sneaking out at night, and for that reason Mr Gilbert, who did not want the girl under his roof, insisted she leave.
Helen left the baby clothes at the Gilberts, still wrapped, and made her way to the Old Colonist Inn.
 Alfred Pickford was the next witness, a former employer of MacNamara. 
MacNamara has seen Pickford wife and told her she had spent some time in the Destitute Asylum, that she had been promised marriage from a man in the country, and that the baby had died. She stated that that very morning she was released.
 As it turns out, that very day, was the same day she had left the Old Colonist Inn.
Miss Ellen MacNamara, it was revealed, had given birth to the child of Sidney Gilbert. Sidney had written letters to her saying he would arrange to marry her, after she had the child, and travelled to where he lived.
 She had concealed her pregnancy due to being unmarried and had given birth to the still-born child in the room she rented at the Old Colonist Inn.
 The Jury asked for charges of “Concealment of Birth” to be pressed by the Police on Miss MacNamara.
Ellen MacNamara, 22 (sometimes known as Frawley) pleased guilty to charges of Concealment of Baby. She was sentenced to 3 months of imprisonment.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018
Bibliography
1880 ‘CORONER’S INQUEST.’, The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 – 1922), 8 June, p. 2. (SECOND EDITION.), viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207589684
1880 ‘CORONERS’ INQUESTS.’, South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 – 1881), 12 June, p. 9. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94751416
1880 ‘TELEGRAMS.’, Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), 9 June, p. 3. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77588306
1880 ‘Law Courts.’, South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 – 1881), 7 August, p. 10. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94752475

Baby in Water Closet – Colonist Tavern, Norwood.

Baby in Water Closet – Colonist Tavern, Norwood.


A newly born male baby, weighing 7 pounds was found in the water closet (toilet) of the Colonist Inn on the Parade Norwood, in 1880. During the newborns autopsy, held by Dr Verco, it was revealed that child had been born recently, but was mostly likely still born as the child had never tried to breath. However, if the mother had have been with a mid-wife, there was evidence the child would of lived.
An inquest into the death was held at Destitute Asylum on Kermode Street in Adelaide, by the City Coroner where details of how the baby came to be in the toilet were revealed. 
Mary Hand, an inn servant revealed that a young lady named Ellen MacNamara visited the Old Colonist Inn on May 17th, 1880. Helen claimed to be very tired and went to bed without dinner.
 The next day, Ellen helped Mary with some of her work, but collapsed. Mary helped her as best she could, and after dinner that night, did not see Ellen again until the following day at 9 am.

 That morning Ellen told Mary she had soiled the bed-sheets and would wash them out and hang them herself. Ellen washed the sheets but left them soaking in the water. Before leaving, Ellen told Mary that she was planning to travel out to the country.
That evening, Mary went into Ellen’s room to tidy up and found that there were bloodied clothes, and blood on the mattress. She reported the soiled mattress to her bosses Mr and Mrs Bern.
 Mr Bern notified the local police, that he believed a child may have been born in his hotel.

As more details emerged, it was revealed that Ellen MacNamara claimed that she had become pregnant to Sidney George Gilbert, who was a butcher living at Government Gums. Gilbert’s mother, Ann was called as a witness, and she revealed that Helen had visited her house, saying she was pregnant to her son Sidney.

 Mrs Gilbert took the young girl in as she felt the girl might need some care. In the mean time she wrote to her son asking about Ellen and the chances of her being pregnant to him.
Sidney outright denied getting Ellen pregnant, but Mrs Gilbert allowed the girl to stay with her for 11 weeks, and in that time collected some children’s clothing for the unborn child.
 It was revealed to Mrs Gilbert during that 11 weeks, that Ellen did not like, nor want children.
 The reason Ellen left the care of the Gilbert family was revealed. She had been sneaking out at night, and for that reason Mr Gilbert, who did not want the girl under his roof, insisted she leave.
Helen left the baby clothes at the Gilbert’s, still wrapped, and made her way to the Old Colonist Inn.

 Alfred Pickford was the next witness, a former employer of MacNamara. 
MacNamara has seen Pickford wife and told her she had spent some time in the Destitute Asylum, that she had been promised marriage from a man in the country, and that the baby had died. She stated that that very morning she was released.
 As it turns out, that very day, was the same day she had left the Old Colonist Inn.
Miss Ellen MacNamara, it was revealed, had given birth to the child of Sidney Gilbert. Sidney had written letters to her saying he would arrange to marry her, after she had the child, and traveled to where he lived.
 She had concealed her pregnancy due to being unmarried and had given birth to the still-born child in the room she rented at the Old Colonist Inn.
 The Jury asked for charges of “Concealment of Birth” to be pressed by the Police on Miss MacNamara.
Ellen MacNamara, 22 (sometimes known as Frawley) pleaded guilty to charges of ‘Concealment of a Baby’. She was sentenced to 3 months of imprisonment.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018
Bibliography

1880 ‘CORONER’S INQUEST.’, The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 – 1922), 8 June, p. 2. (SECOND EDITION.), viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207589684

1880 ‘CORONERS’ INQUESTS.’, South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 – 1881), 12 June, p. 9. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94751416

1880 ‘TELEGRAMS.’, Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), 9 June, p. 3. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77588306

1880 ‘Law Courts.’, South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 – 1881), 7 August, p. 10. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94752475

Odious Origins of the Colonist Tavern, Norwood.

Odious Origins of the Colonist Tavern, Norwood.


Frederick and Elizabeth Hobbs immigrated from England on board the ‘Coromandel’, the first immigrant ship to reach South Australia from London. The Coromandel transport 150 couples and 36 children and was Captained by William Chesser. It reached Kingscote, South Australia on the 10th of January 1837.
 One of the Hobbs claims to historical fame is that their first child, a girl, was the first Caucasian baby born in the Colony. The Hobbs third daughter, Martha, would later Marry William Brand, one of the original builders and publicans of the Overland Corner Hotel in South Australia’s Riverland.
Frederick Hobbs, a brick maker purchased land in Norwood and established the Old Colonial Inn, a single-story hotel, in 1851. (He also made the bricks for the original St johns Church of Adelaide.)
Frederick Hobbs, history will show, was a disheveled drunk who was abusive to his towards his wife and family. He was convicted for assaulting his wife Elizabeth on the 22nd of January 1855. He stated that he “supposed it was all right. He had a drop of drink at the time.”

 Elizabeth deposed in court that she had been married to Frederick for 20 years, they had 10 children together and had been living in the colony for 18 years. She accused Frederick of violent abuse for the previous eight years, and that he frequently slept with our women and prostitutes.
 She stated that during the Gold Rush, Frederick had left for Victoria, and their baby had died. Frederick had not been paying his way, and goods from Elizabeth had seized to pay his debts.
 He had returned seven months prior and had been abusive to her ever since.
 The Magistrate noted that Frederick had been in court for physically abusing Mrs Hobbs only weeks previously and had broken his bond in only three days. He had pushed her out of the hotel and had gone into Adelaide and purchased an ad in the local papers telling the public not to trust his wife!
 Frederick came unstuck in court when it was brought into evidence that he had been using Elizabeth Hobbs jewellery and belongings to buy time with prostitutes. One of the local Police knew the women he had been sleeping with and was able to find all the objects Mrs Hobbs described as being “sold” off by Frederick.
 It was also revealed, that Frederick had kicked his wife and children out of the hotel and had been sleeping in their bed with a prostitute. Just to make matters worse, he had also put the hotel up for sale.
The Magistrate ordered that Frederick be bound by a 100 pounds bond, that he could not sell the hotel, and that he makes sure he pays maintenance to Mrs Hobbs for the children.
 Local Brewers offered Mrs Hobbs to put her back into the hotel, as she had proven that she was “of ample character” to stay in business. It was not to be for Mrs Hobbs, with Frederick being charged for consecutive breaches of the Publicans Act, the hotel was quickly sold, and poor Elizabeth found herself and her children at the Destitute Asylum.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2018
Bibliography
Suzanne Hirst & Ross Watts, The Story of the Coromandel in Particular the 1843 3 Masted Sailing Ship (South Australia, 2013)

1926 ‘MARTHA BRAND—PIONEER’, Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA : 1913 – 1942), 19 November, p. 9. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109354382
1853 ‘BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.’, Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904), 19 March, p. 7. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158093225
1855 ‘POLICE COURTS.’, Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904), 24 February, p. 4. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158102282

1855 ‘LAW AND POLICE COURTS.’, Adelaide Times (SA : 1848 – 1858), 24 January, p. 3. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207021261

Odious Origins of the Colonist Tavern, Norwood.

Odious Origins of the Colonist Tavern, Norwood.


Frederick and Elizabeth Hobbs immigrated from England on board the ‘Coromandel’, the first immigrant ship to reach South Australia from London. The Coromandel transport 150 couples and 36 children and was Captained by William Chesser. It reached Kingscote, South Australia on the 10th of January 1837.
 One of the Hobbs claims to historical fame is that their first child, a girl, was the first Caucasian baby born in the Colony. The Hobbs third daughter, Martha, would later Marry William Brand, one of the original builders and publicans of the Overland Corner Hotel in South Australia’s Riverland.
Frederick Hobbs, a brick maker purchased land in Norwood and established the Old Colonial Inn, a single-story hotel, in 1851. (He also made the bricks for the original St johns Church of Adelaide.)
Frederick Hobbs, history will show, was a disheveled drunk who was abusive to his towards his wife and family. He was convicted for assaulting his wife Elizabeth on the 22nd of January 1855. He stated that he “supposed it was all right. He had a drop of drink at the time.”

 Elizabeth deposed in court that she had been married to Frederick for 20 years, they had 10 children together and had been living in the colony for 18 years. She accused Frederick of violent abuse for the previous eight years, and that he frequently slept with our women and prostitutes.
 She stated that during the Gold Rush, Frederick had left for Victoria, and their baby had died. Frederick had not been paying his way, and goods from Elizabeth had seized to pay his debts.
 He had returned seven months prior and had been abusive to her ever since.
 The Magistrate noted that Frederick had been in court for physically abusing Mrs Hobbs only weeks previously and had broken his bond in only three days. He had pushed her out of the hotel and had gone into Adelaide and purchased an ad in the local papers telling the public not to trust his wife!
 Frederick came unstuck in court when it was brought into evidence that he had been using Elizabeth Hobbs jewellery and belongings to buy time with prostitutes. One of the local Police knew the women he had been sleeping with and was able to find all the objects Mrs Hobbs described as being “sold” off by Frederick.
 It was also revealed, that Frederick had kicked his wife and children out of the hotel and had been sleeping in their bed with a prostitute. Just to make matters worse, he had also put the hotel up for sale.
The Magistrate ordered that Frederick be bound by a 100 pounds bond, that he could not sell the hotel, and that he makes sure he pays maintenance to Mrs Hobbs for the children.
 Local Brewers offered Mrs Hobbs to put her back into the hotel, as she had proven that she was “of ample character” to stay in business. It was not to be for Mrs Hobbs, with Frederick being charged for consecutive breaches of the Publicans Act, the hotel was quickly sold, and poor Elizabeth found herself and her children at the Destitute Asylum.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2018
Bibliography
Suzanne Hirst & Ross Watts, The Story of the Coromandel in Particular the 1843 3 Masted Sailing Ship (South Australia, 2013)

1926 ‘MARTHA BRAND—PIONEER’, Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA : 1913 – 1942), 19 November, p. 9. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109354382
1853 ‘BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.’, Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904), 19 March, p. 7. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158093225
1855 ‘POLICE COURTS.’, Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904), 24 February, p. 4. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158102282

1855 ‘LAW AND POLICE COURTS.’, Adelaide Times (SA : 1848 – 1858), 24 January, p. 3. , viewed 04 Aug 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207021261