Monthly Archives: January 2018

A Haunting at Minlaton, Yorke Peninsula


A Haunting at Minlaton, Yorke Peninsula

 

It has been alleged that the Porter Building, located at 49-55 Main Street, Minlaton, Yorke Peninsula is haunted by a former lolly shop owner who died in a fire in 1958.
Claims of a ghost causing paranormal activity in the building are common, with previous tenants claiming that objects would mysteriously move on their own, that doors and windows would, on occasion open and close with no human contact.
 Cold spots have been reported, as well as cold breezes on scorching hot days, and at least one person claiming to witness a strange human-like apparition floating through the building, seen from outside.
Previously to the current shops being constructed, the original buildings were a shop and small residence, which were owned by local council member Kevin (K.G.) King in the 1950’s.
Mr and Mrs King were dressmakers and set up shop in 1948, renting the premises from Mr Poole.
 In the small residence lived 80-year-old Mabel Evelyn Lock, who once lived across Main Street with her husband, Edwin Ernest Lock, where they ran their own business, and where Edwin tended his prize winning garden.
Edwin passed away in 1940, and Mabel lived and worked in the town for a while longer, until moving into the residence alongside Mr Kings shop.
 On January 11th, 1954, W. J. McMahon, a neighbour, noticed smoke billowing from the Mrs Lock’s house. He called the fire brigade and the local doctor for help.
 The fire was extinguished, but poor Mrs Lock was found dead in her bedroom.
A coroner’s report stated that the cause of death was a heart attack, and the probably cause of the fire was that Mrs Lock had been carrying a candle as she made her way to bed. The candle fell forward onto the bed igniting the covers, and later Mrs Locks clothing. The coroner stated her death was firstly the heart attach, then asphyxiation from the smoke.
It has previously been stated online, that because of Mrs Lock’s death in 1954, that she is the ghost that haunts the building. This is of course speculation, unless someone can clearly identify the alleged spirit, then the ghost could obviously be anyone, but in stating that, her death, being shocking to her, could also be the foundation for her to haunt the building…
Have you visited the Porter Building at Minlaton on the Yorke Peninsula, and heard, felt or seen something paranormal? Let us know over on our facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/TheHauntsOfAdelaide/
Or in the comments section below.
© 2018 Allen Tiller

Bibliography: 
1948 ‘MINLATON’, The Pioneer (Yorketown, SA : 1898 – 1954), 21 May, p. 6. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article199213919

1954 ‘Found Dead in Smoke-Filled Bedroom’, The Pioneer (Yorketown, SA : 1898 – 1954), 15 January, p. 1. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article204756613

1954 ‘Woman’s body near blazing bed’, News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 – 1954), 13 January, p. 1. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article134476027

A Haunting at Minlaton, Yorke Peninsula


A Haunting at Minlaton, Yorke Peninsula

 

It has been alleged that the Porter Building, located at 49-55 Main Street, Minlaton, Yorke Peninsula is haunted by a former lolly shop owner who died in a fire in 1958.
Claims of a ghost causing paranormal activity in the building are common, with previous tenants claiming that objects would mysteriously move on their own, that doors and windows would, on occasion open and close with no human contact.
 Cold spots have been reported, as well as cold breezes on scorching hot days, and at least one person claiming to witness a strange human-like apparition floating through the building, seen from outside.
Previously to the current shops being constructed, the original buildings were a shop and small residence, which were owned by local council member Kevin (K.G.) King in the 1950’s.
Mr and Mrs King were dressmakers and set up shop in 1948, renting the premises from Mr Poole.
 In the small residence lived 80-year-old Mabel Evelyn Lock, who once lived across Main Street with her husband, Edwin Ernest Lock, where they ran their own business, and where Edwin tended his prize winning garden.
Edwin passed away in 1940, and Mabel lived and worked in the town for a while longer, until moving into the residence alongside Mr Kings shop.
 On January 11th, 1954, W. J. McMahon, a neighbour, noticed smoke billowing from the Mrs Lock’s house. He called the fire brigade and the local doctor for help.
 The fire was extinguished, but poor Mrs Lock was found dead in her bedroom.
A coroner’s report stated that the cause of death was a heart attack, and the probably cause of the fire was that Mrs Lock had been carrying a candle as she made her way to bed. The candle fell forward onto the bed igniting the covers, and later Mrs Locks clothing. The coroner stated her death was firstly the heart attach, then asphyxiation from the smoke.
It has previously been stated online, that because of Mrs Lock’s death in 1954, that she is the ghost that haunts the building. This is of course speculation, unless someone can clearly identify the alleged spirit, then the ghost could obviously be anyone, but in stating that, her death, being shocking to her, could also be the foundation for her to haunt the building…
Have you visited the Porter Building at Minlaton on the Yorke Peninsula, and heard, felt or seen something paranormal? Let us know over on our facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/TheHauntsOfAdelaide/
Or in the comments section below.
© 2018 Allen Tiller

Bibliography: 
1948 ‘MINLATON’, The Pioneer (Yorketown, SA : 1898 – 1954), 21 May, p. 6. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article199213919

1954 ‘Found Dead in Smoke-Filled Bedroom’, The Pioneer (Yorketown, SA : 1898 – 1954), 15 January, p. 1. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article204756613

1954 ‘Woman’s body near blazing bed’, News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 – 1954), 13 January, p. 1. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article134476027

The Mysterious Death of Edward Shann


The Mysterious Death of Edward Shann

  

 Edward Shann was born on the 30th of April 1884, in Hobart Tasmania, the youngest child of schoolmaster and journalist Frank Shann and his second wife Frances (nee Wood).
 Shann was educated firstly by his father, and after moving to Melbourne in the late 1880’s, via attendance at Wesley College, Queens College and University of Melbourne. He was a gifted young student, and despite set backs during the depression period of the 1890’s, of which he overcome by winning various scholarships, he achieved honours in History and Political Economy.
 Shann went on to become a much sought-after lecturer, finding work at the University of Melbourne lecturing on constitutional history, and later in Adelaide as an acting professor of philosophy at the University of Adelaide.
 In 1908, Shann left Australia for England, where he would study at the London School of Economics and broaden his knowledge by learning from various scholars of the day. He returned to Australia in 1910.
 He became a lecturer at the University of Queensland (1911-1912), teaching history and economics.

In 1912, Shann moved to Western Australia and became a professor of history and economics at the University of Western Australia.
Shann’s career spanned the continent of Australia, and his influence on students at the time, was vast, directly influencing many great minds of the future, including Historian and Rhodes Scholar, John A. La Nauze.
Shann, despite his heavy workload, still found time to write numerous books and essays about history and economics, including;

  • ·         An Economic History of Australia
  • ·         Bond or Free?
  • ·         Cattle Chosen: The Story of the First Group Settlement in Western Australia, 1829 to 1841
  • ·         The Boom of 1890 – and Now

 In 1930, Shann was invited by the Bank of New South Wales to become its economic consultant, a first of its kind position in Australia. Shann would go on to establish an economics department within the bank, another first for any bank in Australia.

In 1933, Shann accepted a chair of economics at the University of Adelaide, but he spent 1934, working in Perth, returning to Adelaide in 1935.

On the 23rd of May 1935, Shann gave his last lecture for the term, and collected his student’s papers and hurried off to his office. It is not known exactly what happened next, but 20 minutes later, at 7:40pm, Edward Shann was found by a student, Shann was lying in a pool of blood, on the ground, directly below his first-floor office window.

Shann’s watch had stopped at the time of impact, 7:35pm. His gold rimmed spectacles were laying nearby. An ambulance was called, and Shann was taken away, dying from the trauma of his fractured skull on the way to the hospital.

A coroner’s investigation led to a finding of suicide, based on the finding of a note in Shann’s home, that should any tragedy befall him in the near future, that his finances be taken care of by his will executor. Not a suicide note, but enough for the police at the time to conclude this was the case.

The police report of the incident noted that inside Shann’s office, which he shared with his assistant, John A La Nauze, there were no signs of a struggle. Shann’s coat and other belongings were exactly as they should be, the only things out of order were two pens found on the floor.
During interviews with staff and students that had interacted with Shann that day, and in previous weeks, it was established that Shann had been suffering form some form of exhaustion, that often led to dizzy spells, but for the most part, he was his normal cheerful self.

So, the question remains, did Edward Shann suffer from a dizzy spell, and accidentally fall out his office window, did he jump and end his own life or was it something more sinister? We will probably never know, but, if you would like to learn more about the circumstances and mystery surrounding Shann’s death, please read the essay “The Mystery of Edward Shann” by Alex Millnow (found here: http://www.freepatentsonline.com/article/History-Economics-Review/176776085.html).

Edward Shann was survived by his wife and three daughters. He was cremated in Adelaide, with memorial services provided in Adelaide and Perth.

The Edward Shann Memorial Lecturer, an annual event, was established in his honour in 1961. The University
of Western Australia also erected the Shann Memorial in his honour.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2017

www.AllenTiller.com.au

www.EidolonParanormal.com.au

The following assets were used to research and write this blog:

1935 ‘OBITUARY.’, Northern Times (Carnarvon, WA : 1905 – 1952), 29 May, p. 3. , viewed 18 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74879584

1936 ‘EDWARD SHANN MEMORIAL FUND.’, The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), 22 September, p. 10. , viewed 18 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17278523

1936 ‘EDWARD SHANN MEMORIAL.’, The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 – 1954), 28 October, p. 6. , viewed 18 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article40972224

1937 ‘MEN I REMEMBER’, Sunday Times (Perth, WA : 1902 – 1954), 6 June, p. 13. (First Section), viewed 18 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58781399

G. D. Snooks, ‘Shann, Edward Owen Giblin (1884–1935)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/shann-edward-owen-giblin-8395/text14741, published first in hardcopy 1988, accessed online 18 December 2017

Millnow, A, 2005, The Mystery of Edward Shann, History of Economics Review, History of Economic Thought Society of Australia, viewed 18 December 2017, http://www.freepatentsonline.com/article/History-Economics-Review/176776085.html

Stuart Macintyre, ‘La Nauze, Andrew John (1911–1990)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/la-nauze-andrew-john-575/text25044, published first in hardcopy 2012, accessed online 18 December 2017.

The Mysterious Death of Edward Shann


The Mysterious Death of Edward Shann

  
 Edward Shann was born on the 30th of April 1884, in Hobart Tasmania, the youngest child of schoolmaster and journalist Frank Shann and his second wife Frances (nee Wood).
 Shann was educated firstly by his father, and after moving to Melbourne in the late 1880s, via attendance at Wesley College, Queens College and the University of Melbourne. He was a gifted young student, and despite setbacks during the depression period of the 1890s, of which he overcome by winning various scholarships, he achieved honours in History and Political Economy.
 Shann went on to become a much sought-after lecturer, finding work at the University of Melbourne lecturing on constitutional history, and later in Adelaide as an acting professor of philosophy at the University of Adelaide.

 In 1908, Shann left Australia for England, where he would study at the London School of Economics and broaden his knowledge by learning from various scholars of the day. He returned to Australia in 1910.

 He became a lecturer at the University of Queensland (1911-1912), teaching history and economics.
In 1912, Shann moved to Western Australia and became a professor of history and economics at the University of Western Australia.

  • ·         An Economic History of Australia
  • ·         Bond or Free?
  • ·         Cattle Chosen: The Story of the First Group Settlement in Western Australia, 1829 to 1841
  • ·         The Boom of 1890 – and Now

Shann’s career spanned the continent of Australia, and his influence on students at the time, was vast, directly influencing many great minds of the future, including Historian and Rhodes Scholar, John A. La Nauze.
Shann, despite his heavy workload, still found time to write numerous books and essays about history and economics, including;


 In 1930, Shann was invited by the Bank of New South Wales to become its economic consultant, a first of its kind position in Australia. Shann would go on to establish an economics department within the bank, another first for any bank in Australia.

In 1933, Shann accepted a chair of economics at the University of Adelaide, but he spent 1934, working in Perth, returning to Adelaide in 1935.

On the 23rd of May 1935, Shann gave his last lecture for the term, and collected his student’s papers and hurried off to his office. It is not known exactly what happened next, but 20 minutes later, at 7:40pm, Edward Shann was found by a student, Shann was lying in a pool of blood, on the ground, directly below his first-floor office window.

Shann’s watch had stopped at the time of impact, 7:35pm. His gold-rimmed spectacles were laying nearby. An ambulance was called, and Shann was taken away, dying from the trauma of his fractured skull on the way to the hospital.

A coroner’s investigation led to a finding of suicide, based on the finding of a handwritten note in Shann’s home, that should any tragedy befall him in the near future, that his finances be taken care of by his will executor. Not a suicide note, but enough for the police at the time to conclude this was the case.


The police report of the incident noted that inside Shann’s office, which he shared with his assistant, John A La Nauze, there were no signs of a struggle. Shann’s coat and other belongings were exactly as they should be, the only things out of order were two pens found on the floor.
During interviews with staff and students that had interacted with Shann that day, and in previous weeks, it was established that Shann had been suffering from some form of exhaustion, that often led to dizzy spells, but for the most part, he was his normal cheerful self.


So, the question remains, did Edward Shann suffer from a dizzy spell, and accidentally fall out his office window, did he jump and end his own life or was it something more sinister? We will probably never know, but, if you would like to learn more about the circumstances and mystery surrounding Shann’s death, please read the essay “The Mystery of Edward Shann” by Alex Millnow (found here: http://www.freepatentsonline.com/article/History-Economics-Review/176776085.html).

Edward Shann was survived by his wife and three daughters. He was cremated in Adelaide, with memorial services provided in Adelaide and Perth.

The Edward Shann Memorial Lecturer, an annual event, was established in his honour in 1961. The University of Western Australia also erected the Shann Memorial in his honour.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2017

www.AllenTiller.com.au

www.EidolonParanormal.com.au

The following assets were used to research and write this blog:

1935 ‘OBITUARY.’, Northern Times (Carnarvon, WA: 1905 – 1952), 29 May, p. 3. , viewed 18 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74879584

1936 ‘EDWARD SHANN MEMORIAL FUND.’, The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW: 1842 – 1954), 22 September, p. 10. , viewed 18 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17278523

1936 ‘EDWARD SHANN MEMORIAL.’, The West Australian (Perth, WA: 1879 – 1954), 28 October, p. 6. , viewed 18 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article40972224

1937 ‘MEN I REMEMBER’, Sunday Times (Perth, WA: 1902 – 1954), 6 June, p. 13. (First Section), viewed 18 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58781399

G. D. Snooks, ‘Shann, Edward Owen Giblin (1884–1935)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/shann-edward-owen-giblin-8395/text14741, published first in hardcopy 1988, accessed online 18 December 2017

Millnow, A, 2005, The Mystery of Edward Shann, History of Economics Review, History of Economic Thought Society of Australia, viewed 18 December 2017, http://www.freepatentsonline.com/article/History-Economics-Review/176776085.html

Stuart Macintyre, ‘La Nauze, Andrew John (1911–1990)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/la-nauze-andrew-john-575/text25044, published first in hardcopy 2012, accessed online 18 December 2017.

A Haunting in Strathalbyn: The Ghost Larrikins


A Haunting in Strathalbyn: The Ghost Larrikins

 

Before the Magistrates Court in Strathalbyn, 1887, an alleged ghost was put on trial for haunting an alleyway in the town.
 The ghostly offender, who was brought to court after being captured by Corporal Cate, faced Magistrates E. Castle and W Colman, on the charge of Disturbing the Peace.
The previous Wednesday night, a ghost was heard at midnight, wailing down the side alley of several houses. The nearby residents, woken by the strange sound, and a little fearful (these were superstitious times after all!) crept outside for a look.
 One of the residents, Mr Joseph Wesley, armed himself with a dog chain, and made his way outside, then into the laneway. He saw a strange figure, draped in white that suddenly hid in the bushes. Wesley, decided to investigate further, and found the ghost, a young man wearing a puggaree (a thin muslin scarf tied round a sun helmet so as to hang down over the wearer’s neck and shield it from the sun.)
The police were called, and after a little investigation, it was revealed that the ghost was none other than local, Ralph Wilson, a young man described as “half-crazy” in court proceedings, and therefore unable to plead for himself.
 Wilson gave up two other young men, who had talked him into playing the ghost. Daniel Bray and J Stephens were both charged with aiding and abetting,
The three young men were very lucky to have received an excellent defense attorney in Mr E. J. tucker, who presented to the court a technicality, which allowed all three young men to walk free from court, but not without a warning from Judge Coleman, who warned them not to be seen in his court again!
…and so, another alleged ghost in Strathalbyn was unmasked!
Researched and written by Allen Tiller.
© 2018 Allen Tiller
Bibliography
1877 ‘General News.’, Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 – 1954), 24 May, p. 2. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96886495
1877 ‘MAGISTRATES’ COURT, STRATHALBYN.’, Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 – 1954), 31 May, p. 3. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96886595

A Haunting in Strathalbyn: The Ghost Larrikins


A Haunting in Strathalbyn: The Ghost Larrikins

 

Before the Magistrates Court in Strathalbyn, 1887, an alleged ghost was put on trial for haunting an alleyway in the town.
 The ghostly offender, who was brought to court after being captured by Corporal Cate, faced Magistrates E. Castle and W Colman, on the charge of Disturbing the Peace.
The previous Wednesday night, a ghost was heard at midnight, wailing down the side alley of several houses. The nearby residents, woken by the strange sound, and a little fearful (these were superstitious times after all!) crept outside for a look.
 One of the residents, Mr Joseph Wesley, armed himself with a dog chain, and made his way outside, then into the laneway. He saw a strange figure, draped in white that suddenly hid in the bushes. Wesley, decided to investigate further, and found the ghost, a young man wearing a puggaree (a thin muslin scarf tied round a sun helmet so as to hang down over the wearer’s neck and shield it from the sun.)
The police were called, and after a little investigation, it was revealed that the ghost was none other than local, Ralph Wilson, a young man described as “half-crazy” in court proceedings, and therefore unable to plead for himself.
 Wilson gave up two other young men, who had talked him into playing the ghost. Daniel Bray and J Stephens were both charged with aiding and abetting,
The three young men were very lucky to have received an excellent defense attorney in Mr E. J. tucker, who presented to the court a technicality, which allowed all three young men to walk free from court, but not without a warning from Judge Coleman, who warned them not to be seen in his court again!
…and so, another alleged ghost in Strathalbyn was unmasked!
Researched and written by Allen Tiller.
© 2018 Allen Tiller
Bibliography
1877 ‘General News.’, Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 – 1954), 24 May, p. 2. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96886495
1877 ‘MAGISTRATES’ COURT, STRATHALBYN.’, Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 – 1954), 31 May, p. 3. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96886595

A Haunting in Strathalbyn: Glowing Ghosts


A Haunting in Strathalbyn: Glowing Ghosts

In the winter of 1874 and 1875, ghost hunting fever overtook the residents of Strathalbyn, a small hamlet (at the time) 57 km’s southeast of Adelaide, not far from Lake Alexandria.

It all began when Mr W. T. Tregilgas, a local decided to take a short cut through the local cemetery on his early morning walk. Mr Tregilgas witnessed the outline of a woman on the top of an old tombstone. He claimed where the image appeared was dry to the touch, but where it did not appear was wet with early morning dew.

 This sighting led to a national story about the case, and an influx of tourists trying to see the ghost for themselves.

It also led to numerous sightings in the town for many years afterwards.

In the same cemetery, at the same tombstone, a ghostly white figure, luminescent in the fading moon glow was seen laying on its side in the cemetery. The ghost was sighted by a small group of townsfolk, all of whom were far too frightened to enter the cemetery and investigate. The following day, members of the group told all and sundry about their ghostly encounter, while most just scoffed at the suggestion, others became curious.

 The following night a group went to the cemetery, but the spectre did not appear. They kept their nightly vigil, always arriving just before midnight. Only a few nights later, the ghost had reappeared on the same tombstone, again, relaxing, laying on its side, glowing in the pale moonlight.

Non-believers became instant believers, but again, no-one was brave enough to venture into the cemetery and investigate the ghost. If they had, they would’ve discovered a well-known local joker, who had been investing heavily at Francis Millers local chemist shop in phosphorous and its anhydrous solvents!
For more information about this beautiful part of South Australia:
http://strathalbynsa.com.au/
Researched and written by Allen Tiller.
© 2018 Allen Tiller
Bibliography
1912 ‘JOTTINGS.’, Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 – 1954), 7 November, p. 3. , viewed 29 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96975184

A Haunting in Strathalbyn: Glowing Ghosts


A Haunting in Strathalbyn: Glowing Ghosts

In the winter of 1874 and 1875, ghost hunting fever overtook the residents of Strathalbyn, a small hamlet (at the time) 57 km’s southeast of Adelaide, not far from Lake Alexandria.

It all began when Mr W. T. Tregilgas, a local decided to take a short cut through the local cemetery on his early morning walk. Mr Tregilgas witnessed the outline of a woman on the top of an old tombstone. He claimed where the image appeared was dry to the touch, but where it did not appear was wet with early morning dew.

 This sighting led to a national story about the case, and an influx of tourists trying to see the ghost for themselves.

It also led to numerous sightings in the town for many years afterwards.

In the same cemetery, at the same tombstone, a ghostly white figure, luminescent in the fading moon glow was seen laying on its side in the cemetery. The ghost was sighted by a small group of townsfolk, all of whom were far too frightened to enter the cemetery and investigate. The following day, members of the group told all and sundry about their ghostly encounter, while most just scoffed at the suggestion, others became curious.

 The following night a group went to the cemetery, but the spectre did not appear. They kept their nightly vigil, always arriving just before midnight. Only a few nights later, the ghost had reappeared on the same tombstone, again, relaxing, laying on its side, glowing in the pale moonlight.

Non-believers became instant believers, but again, no-one was brave enough to venture into the cemetery and investigate the ghost. If they had, they would’ve discovered a well-known local joker, who had been investing heavily at Francis Millers local chemist shop in phosphorous and its anhydrous solvents!
For more information about this beautiful part of South Australia:
http://strathalbynsa.com.au/
Researched and written by Allen Tiller.
© 2018 Allen Tiller
Bibliography
1912 ‘JOTTINGS.’, Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 – 1954), 7 November, p. 3. , viewed 29 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96975184

A Haunting in Strathalbyn: Ghost in the Cemetery


A Haunting in Strathalbyn: Ghost in the Cemetery

A Statement from Mr W.T. Tregilgas about the sighting of a spirit in the stone slab of a grave in a Strathalbyn cemetery was first published in 1871, in the Southern Argus (newspaper) as “The Ghost Story; Or What Gave Rise to It”.
 The alleged haunting caused a stir in the town, and became a national sensation as it was picked up and republished across Australia. This led to hundreds of people descending on the town trying to witness the ghost for themselves, and created a local urban legend that is still talked about even today!
The statement is as follows:
“Whilst taking a walk very early one morning, through some motive which I cannot account for, I was induced to walk through the burying ground, and coming to a grave surrounded by a wall, and covered with a slab of slate, I noticed on the slate something strange.
It was scarcely light enough to see distinctly at first, but after waiting for some few minutes I could see it plainly, and it appeared to be a side view of a female.
I could distinctly trace the head and body and the skirts, apparently full size. Not being satisfied with the sight I rubbed my hand on the form, and found that a portion of the slate was perfectly dry, whilst the parts outside the form were very wet with the dew which had fallen, and still not being satisfied I walked away, and came back in about fifteen or twenty minutes after, and still the form was there; so, I determined upon visiting it again next morning, which I did, and continued doing so for a week or more.
During this time only saw the form once after the first morning; but not being a believer in supernatural appearances I tried to define the cause, but failed. In the course of conversation, I told Mr. Morton what I had seen, and he visited the place, and saw the form, although not so plain as it was when I saw it.
 The form was to be seen, and it has been seen since by others. Now, I believe there is some natural cause which produces this strange appearance, and perhaps some person upon reading this will be able to satisfy the minds of those who have seen it, for although many things have been advanced by people as to the probable cause, but none seem satisfactory to my mind, and those who have been eye-witnesses of the sight.”
These are the facts of the case, and they differ widely from the report circulated.
By inserting the above explanation, you will greatly oblige me as well as others.
I am, sir, & c-,
W. T. TREGILGAS,
Strathalbyn.
July 3rd, 1871.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller.
© 2018 Allen Tiller

Bibliography

1871 ‘THE GHOST STORY; OR WHAT GAVE RISE TO IT.’, Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 – 1954), 14 July, p. 3. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96872595

1871 ‘ANOTHER GHOST STORY.’, Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 – 1875), 24 July, p. 3. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60874405

1871 ‘TRUE GHOST STORIES.’, The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), 28 July, p. 4. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8872154

A Haunting in Strathalbyn: Ghost in the Cemetery


A Haunting in Strathalbyn: Ghost in the Cemetery

A Statement from Mr W.T. Tregilgas about the sighting of a spirit in the stone slab of a grave in a Strathalbyn cemetery was first published in 1871, in the Southern Argus (newspaper) as “The Ghost Story; Or What Gave Rise to It”.
 The alleged haunting caused a stir in the town, and became a national sensation as it was picked up and republished across Australia. This led to hundreds of people descending on the town trying to witness the ghost for themselves, and created a local urban legend that is still talked about even today!
The statement is as follows:
“Whilst taking a walk very early one morning, through some motive which I cannot account for, I was induced to walk through the burying ground, and coming to a grave surrounded by a wall, and covered with a slab of slate, I noticed on the slate something strange.
It was scarcely light enough to see distinctly at first, but after waiting for some few minutes I could see it plainly, and it appeared to be a side view of a female.
I could distinctly trace the head and body and the skirts, apparently full size. Not being satisfied with the sight I rubbed my hand on the form, and found that a portion of the slate was perfectly dry, whilst the parts outside the form were very wet with the dew which had fallen, and still not being satisfied I walked away, and came back in about fifteen or twenty minutes after, and still the form was there; so, I determined upon visiting it again next morning, which I did, and continued doing so for a week or more.
During this time only saw the form once after the first morning; but not being a believer in supernatural appearances I tried to define the cause, but failed. In the course of conversation, I told Mr. Morton what I had seen, and he visited the place, and saw the form, although not so plain as it was when I saw it.
 The form was to be seen, and it has been seen since by others. Now, I believe there is some natural cause which produces this strange appearance, and perhaps some person upon reading this will be able to satisfy the minds of those who have seen it, for although many things have been advanced by people as to the probable cause, but none seem satisfactory to my mind, and those who have been eye-witnesses of the sight.”
These are the facts of the case, and they differ widely from the report circulated.
By inserting the above explanation, you will greatly oblige me as well as others.
I am, sir, & c-,
W. T. TREGILGAS,
Strathalbyn.
July 3rd, 1871.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller.
© 2018 Allen Tiller

Bibliography

1871 ‘THE GHOST STORY; OR WHAT GAVE RISE TO IT.’, Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 – 1954), 14 July, p. 3. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96872595

1871 ‘ANOTHER GHOST STORY.’, Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 – 1875), 24 July, p. 3. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60874405

1871 ‘TRUE GHOST STORIES.’, The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), 28 July, p. 4. , viewed 30 Dec 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8872154