Monthly Archives: March 2018

A Ghost in the Adelaide Central Markets

A Ghost in the Adelaide Central Markets

The Adelaide Central Markets began when a group of gardeners and farmers met at the site in 1869 to sell produce. A year later the market became official and housed between 50 to 100 stalls, selling everything from fish to hay.
 It wasn’t until the 8th of February 1900 that the first permanent building was erected onsite.
In 1925, after two decades of successful trading and growth, the City Markets suffered its first setback when a fire tore through the north eastern section of the markets, destroying the livelihoods of many traders.
40 years later the then “City Markets” were officially given the title of “The Central Markets”, this period also saw the first refurbishment of the markets, adding a new rooftop carpark.
In 197 a second setback occurred, when another fire burnt through much of the southern section of the market. This setback was a blessing in disguise, as it allowed refurbishments, restricting and rebuilding, which took until 1983 to be completed.
 Today the Central Markets are still just as popular as when they first started, featuring over 80 stalls.
In 2014, The Adelaide Central Market management released a security footage tape of what they allege to be a ghostly presence in the market. A security guard doing his usual patrol reported something unseen brushing against him, so the CCTV cameras were checked, and a ghost like image was spotted walking through the Markets.
The incident happened at the intersection where Market Plaza meets the Adelaide Central Market.
 Johnny Carbone, the security guard who experienced the sensation of someone going past him, and later filmed the incident via the CCTV monitor onto his phone, stated the following in an Advertiser article printed in 2014:

 “I came in early on a Wednesday morning about 3am,” he said. “As I was doing my normal patrols of unlocking the market, I felt like something went past and touched me, so I looked behind me and there was no one there.”
“I was like, ‘You know what, I’m just going to check the camera’, and as I checked the camera I saw that light.”
“I couldn’t believe what I was watching … I was just rewinding the footage and thinking, ‘Is that really what I saw?’
“I actually ran back downstairs to see with my own eyes if anything was there, but obviously there wasn’t.”
“I’m not a believer, but then it makes you think twice … sometimes I think maybe there is something out there, but you just don’t know.”
Recently, this article resurfaced, and I decided to take a closer look at the video, making the following notes.
Take a look at the following photo where I have added two rings to highlight my points.
The red circle; note the light source that is constant in this portion, and would directly correlate to the light that shines not only on the grill, but on the sign on the right, next to the white sign.
The purple circle; if you watch on full screen and look very closely, it appears the bottom of the grill/pull down door bends or arcs as the light moves across it, this would suggest, in my opinion, some video manipulation.

I have not personally spoken to Mr Carbone about his experience, very interested to hear him recount this event and any other factors missing from the original Advertiser news story.
What are your thoughts on the video? Real or fake?
Have you experienced a ghost in the Adelaide Central Market? Please feel free to comment on this story here on The Haunts of Adelaide, or over on our facebook page on the link below?
Researched and written by Allen Tiller.

Bibliography:

Allan R & Mattsson D, 2014, The Adelaide Central Market releases never-before-seen security footage, which features an unexplained, ghostlike light, The Advertiser, viewed 12 Feb 2016, http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/the-adelaide-central-market-releases-neverbeforeseen-security-footage-which-features-an-unexplained-ghostlike-light/news-story/5cd5c3e890f50f4ab488dfae6d6f3e07

Allen Tiller, 2016, Adelaide Central Markets, Haunted Buildings in Adelaide, Adelaide City Council: “History Hub” Adelaide City Libraries, viewed 5 Jan 2018, https://onecard.network/client/en_AU/adelaide/search/detailnonmodal/ent:$002f$002fSD_ASSET$002f0$002f1291669/one?qu=central+market+Haunted+Buildings+in+Adelaide+Residency+Collection&te=ASSET#

Adelaide Central Markets, 2016, The Market Adelaide Central Markets, , viewed 12 Feb 2016,  http://www.adelaidecentralmarket.com.au/marketmanagement/history/

5AA, 2014, PROOF OF ADELAIDE CENTRAL MARKET GHOST, Nova Entertainment, viewed 5 Jan 2018, https://www.fiveaa.com.au/show/proof-adelaide-central-market-ghost

A Ghost in the Adelaide Central Markets

A Ghost in the Adelaide Central Markets

The Adelaide Central Markets began when a group of gardeners and farmers met at the site in 1869 to sell produce. A year later the market became official and housed between 50 to 100 stalls, selling everything from fish to hay.
 It wasn’t until the 8th of February 1900 that the first permanent building was erected onsite.
In 1925, after two decades of successful trading and growth, the City Markets suffered its first setback when a fire tore through the north eastern section of the markets, destroying the livelihoods of many traders.
40 years later the then “City Markets” were officially given the title of “The Central Markets”, this period also saw the first refurbishment of the markets, adding a new rooftop carpark.
In 197 a second setback occurred, when another fire burnt through much of the southern section of the market. This setback was a blessing in disguise, as it allowed refurbishments, restricting and rebuilding, which took until 1983 to be completed.
 Today the Central Markets are still just as popular as when they first started, featuring over 80 stalls.
In 2014, The Adelaide Central Market management released a security footage tape of what they allege to be a ghostly presence in the market. A security guard doing his usual patrol reported something unseen brushing against him, so the CCTV cameras were checked, and a ghost like image was spotted walking through the Markets.
The incident happened at the intersection where Market Plaza meets the Adelaide Central Market.
 Johnny Carbone, the security guard who experienced the sensation of someone going past him, and later filmed the incident via the CCTV monitor onto his phone, stated the following in an Advertiser article printed in 2014:

 “I came in early on a Wednesday morning about 3am,” he said. “As I was doing my normal patrols of unlocking the market, I felt like something went past and touched me, so I looked behind me and there was no one there.”
“I was like, ‘You know what, I’m just going to check the camera’, and as I checked the camera I saw that light.”
“I couldn’t believe what I was watching … I was just rewinding the footage and thinking, ‘Is that really what I saw?’
“I actually ran back downstairs to see with my own eyes if anything was there, but obviously there wasn’t.”
“I’m not a believer, but then it makes you think twice … sometimes I think maybe there is something out there, but you just don’t know.”
Recently, this article resurfaced, and I decided to take a closer look at the video, making the following notes.
Take a look at the following photo where I have added two rings to highlight my points.
The red circle; note the light source that is constant in this portion, and would directly correlate to the light that shines not only on the grill, but on the sign on the right, next to the white sign.
The purple circle; if you watch on full screen and look very closely, it appears the bottom of the grill/pull down door bends or arcs as the light moves across it, this would suggest, in my opinion, some video manipulation.

I have not personally spoken to Mr Carbone about his experience, very interested to hear him recount this event and any other factors missing from the original Advertiser news story.
What are your thoughts on the video? Real or fake?
Have you experienced a ghost in the Adelaide Central Market? Please feel free to comment on this story here on The Haunts of Adelaide, or over on our facebook page on the link below?
Researched and written by Allen Tiller.

Bibliography:

Allan R & Mattsson D, 2014, The Adelaide Central Market releases never-before-seen security footage, which features an unexplained, ghostlike light, The Advertiser, viewed 12 Feb 2016, http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/the-adelaide-central-market-releases-neverbeforeseen-security-footage-which-features-an-unexplained-ghostlike-light/news-story/5cd5c3e890f50f4ab488dfae6d6f3e07

Allen Tiller, 2016, Adelaide Central Markets, Haunted Buildings in Adelaide, Adelaide City Council: “History Hub” Adelaide City Libraries, viewed 5 Jan 2018, https://onecard.network/client/en_AU/adelaide/search/detailnonmodal/ent:$002f$002fSD_ASSET$002f0$002f1291669/one?qu=central+market+Haunted+Buildings+in+Adelaide+Residency+Collection&te=ASSET#

Adelaide Central Markets, 2016, The Market Adelaide Central Markets, , viewed 12 Feb 2016,  http://www.adelaidecentralmarket.com.au/marketmanagement/history/

5AA, 2014, PROOF OF ADELAIDE CENTRAL MARKET GHOST, Nova Entertainment, viewed 5 Jan 2018, https://www.fiveaa.com.au/show/proof-adelaide-central-market-ghost

The Court Case: The Murder of Hilda Jones.

The Court Case: The Murder of Hilda Jones.




Bruce Stapleton Neal, 19, was brought to trial for the gruesome murder of his girlfriend, Hilda Beryl Jones 16, on the 17thof March 1924 at her place of employment.
The Coroner included in his report that Ms Jones, affectionately known as “Bob” or “Bobby”, had a small gunshot entry hole at the base of skull. Her forehead was mostly missing, and her blood, bone and brain matter was scattered across the walls, ceiling and floor of the office.
The defense issued a statement that Mr Neal was an epileptic, and that when the gun fired, he was in the middle of an epileptic state and unable to control himself.
When asked by the court to enter a plea, “Not Guilty” came the statement from the defendant.
Defense attorney Mr Smith stated “If you remember the dangerous position of the Injury to his head. If you remember his fits and the circumstances surrounding them. If you remember the circumstances attending the murder of Bobby and his condition afterwards, it Is very-easy to take a backward view over his past life, and to say that these fits are epileptic fits.”
 Mr Smith exhorted, “Our only defense is a plea of insanity!”
 The jury retired, and after an hour returned with their verdict. “Not guilty on the grounds of insanity”.
 Justice Parsons, residing over the case, stated that, “In order with the Criminal Consolidation Act, he would order Neal to be kept in strict custody in the criminal ward of the Parkside Mental Hospital during the Governors pleasure.”
 Mrs Neal, who had been in the court room, and who had earlier given evidence in the case, fainted at the reading of her son’s sentence.
Hilda Beryl Jones is buried in the Glen Osmond, “Saint Saviour” Anglican Churchyard.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller.
© 2018 Allen Tiller
Bibliography
1924 ‘ADELAIDE MURDER.’, Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 – 1954), 24 March, p. 2. , viewed 13 Sep 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article102232120

1924 ‘CURRIE STREET TRAGEDY.’, The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 – 1929), 29 May, p. 9. , viewed 01 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57389675

1924 ‘MISS HILDA BERYL JONES.’, Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 – 1931), 22 March, p. 37. , viewed 13 Sep 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article170493300

1924 ‘MURDER CHARGE.’, Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 – 1954), 29 May, p. 2. , viewed 13 Sep 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96099690

1924 ‘MURDER TRIALS.’, The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 – 1929), 27 May, p. 6. , viewed 13 Sep 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57389043

1929 ‘Obituary.’, Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 – 1954), 11 July, p. 44. , viewed 01 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90051284

1924 ‘Hugged, Kissed, and Shot’, Truth (Brisbane, Qld. : 1900 – 1954), 15 June, p. 5. , viewed 01 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article198669988

Photo: 1924 ‘MISS HILDA BERYL JONES.’, Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 – 1931), 22 March, p. 37. , viewed 01 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article170493300

The Court Case: The Murder of Hilda Jones.

The Court Case: The Murder of Hilda Jones.




Bruce Stapleton Neal, 19, was brought to trial for the gruesome murder of his girlfriend, Hilda Beryl Jones 16, on the 17th of March 1924 at her place of employment.
The Coroner included in his report that Ms Jones, affectionately known as “Bob” or “Bobby”, had a small gunshot entry hole at the base of the skull. Her forehead was mostly missing, and her blood, bone and brain matter was scattered across the walls, ceiling and floor of the office.
The defence issued a statement that Mr Neal was an epileptic and that when the gun fired, he was in the middle of an epileptic state and unable to control himself.
When asked by the court to enter a plea, “Not Guilty” came the statement from the defendant.
Defence attorney Mr Smith stated “If you remember the dangerous position of the Injury to his head. If you remember his fits and the circumstances surrounding them. If you remember the circumstances attending the murder of Bobby and his condition afterwards, it is very easy to take a backward view over his past life, and to say that these fits are epileptic fits.”
 Mr Smith exhorted, “Our only defence is a plea of insanity!”
 The jury retired, and after an hour returned with their verdict. “Not guilty on the grounds of insanity”.
 Justice Parsons, presiding over the case, stated that, “In order with the Criminal Consolidation Act, he would order Neal to be kept in strict custody in the criminal ward of the Parkside Mental Hospital during the Governor’s pleasure.”
 Mrs Neal, who had been in the courtroom, and who had earlier given evidence in the case, fainted at the reading of her son’s sentence.
Hilda Beryl Jones is buried in the Glen Osmond, “Saint Saviour” Anglican Churchyard.
Researched and written by Allen Tiller.
© 2018 Allen Tiller
Bibliography
1924 ‘ADELAIDE MURDER.’, Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 – 1954), 24 March, p. 2. , viewed 13 Sep 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article102232120

1924 ‘CURRIE STREET TRAGEDY.’, The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 – 1929), 29 May, p. 9. , viewed 01 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57389675

1924 ‘MISS HILDA BERYL JONES.’, Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 – 1931), 22 March, p. 37. , viewed 13 Sep 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article170493300

1924 ‘MURDER CHARGE.’, Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 – 1954), 29 May, p. 2. , viewed 13 Sep 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96099690

1924 ‘MURDER TRIALS.’, The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 – 1929), 27 May, p. 6. , viewed 13 Sep 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57389043

1929 ‘Obituary.’, Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 – 1954), 11 July, p. 44. , viewed 01 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90051284

1924 ‘Hugged, Kissed, and Shot’, Truth (Brisbane, Qld. : 1900 – 1954), 15 June, p. 5. , viewed 01 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article198669988

Photo: 1924 ‘MISS HILDA BERYL JONES.’, Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 – 1931), 22 March, p. 37. , viewed 01 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article170493300

The Confession of Herbert Stapleton Neal: The Murder of Hilda Jones.

The Confession of Herbert Stapleton Neal: The Murder of Hilda Jones.




“About 1.15 P-m. I left work, taking the rifle with me. Before I left Bickford’s I placed five cartridges in the magazine.
I went outside and stood on the front doorstep for a while. I looked up at West’s window, and Bob beckoned me to come over.
 I went over, and was standing near the stairs. Bob came up to me, and I said “Hello! How are you?” She replied, “I am all right”.
I said, “that’s good.”
The I put my arm around her and kissed her.
We stood talking for some time. I cannot remember what the topic of conversations was. After I had been there for a while, the other girls went to dinner, and left Bob and me in the passage together.
 I like Bob very much, and she returned the affections.
 I don’t quite remember what happened.
 I think I must have been frightened at the thought of our being parted, because we were so attached to one another, and I must have been so alarmed at the thought that I might lose her that I must have at the moment lost my head and thought that it would be better if it were impossible to part us.
I have a recollection of firing the gun. I don’t know how many shots I fired, but I believe I fired only one.
 After that I don’t remember anything much, except that there was a lot of blood standing about. And I think someone asked me my name, but I could not speak.
When I fired the gun, I saw her fall, and blood came from her.”
The statement concluded:
“I am not sorry for what occurred. But I don’t know what possessed me to do such a thing, because we were very friendly. And had been for ab out 28 months. I was very much in love with Bob, and I didn’t want else to have her.”
 (Bob was Hilda’s nickname).
Continued next week


© 2018 Allen Tiller

Bibliography on last post in series.

The Confession of Herbert Stapleton Neal: The Murder of Hilda Jones.

The Confession of Herbert Stapleton Neal: The Murder of Hilda Jones.




“About 1.15 P-m. I left work, taking the rifle with me. Before I left Bickford’s I placed five cartridges in the magazine.
I went outside and stood on the front doorstep for a while. I looked up at West’s window, and Bob beckoned me to come over.
 I went over and was standing near the stairs. Bob came up to me, and I said “Hello! How are you?” She replied, “I am all right”.
I said, “that’s good.”
Then I put my arm around her and kissed her.
We stood talking for some time. I cannot remember what the topic of conversations was. After I had been there for a while, the other girls went to dinner and left Bob and me in the passage together.
 I like Bob very much, and she returned the affections.
 I don’t quite remember what happened.
 I think I must have been frightened at the thought of our being parted, because we were so attached to one another, and I must have been so alarmed at the thought that I might lose her that I must have at the moment lost my head and thought that it would be better if it were impossible to part us.
I have a recollection of firing the gun. I don’t know how many shots I fired, but I believe I fired only one.
 After that, I don’t remember anything much, except that there was a lot of blood standing about. And I think someone asked me my name, but I could not speak.
When I fired the gun, I saw her fall, and blood came from her.”
The statement concluded:
“I am not sorry for what occurred. But I don’t know what possessed me to do such a thing because we were very friendly. And had been for about 28 months. I was very much in love with Bob, and I didn’t want else to have her.”
 (Bob was Hilda’s nickname).
Continued next week


© 2018 Allen Tiller

Bibliography on the last post in series.

Hugged, Kissed and Shot: The Murder of Hilda Jones.

Hugged, Kissed and Shot: The Murder of Hilda Jones.

“Even as he kissed her ruby lips his teetering brain gave finally away,

And, a wreck at random driven, without one glimpse of reason or of heaven 
He raised his deadly rifle, raised it so that none should have her,
She never spoke, poor child.


 The smile faded from her eyes with the crumbling of her skull, 
shattered by that awful bullet, as she fell a maimed and bleeding thing upon the floor,
while he, ghastly, staring, stood over the body, 
waving intruders aside, until at last, the policeman came, and he swooned off in their arms.”

 – Truth (QLD newspaper) 15 June 1924.

On the 17th of March 1924, Hilda Jones went to work at her job at the offices of Mr W.A.A. West, Estate Agent and Horse Racing enthusiast, where she worked as a typist. The office was situated on Currie Street in Adelaide.

That same morning, Bert Neal arrived at his job at Bickford and Sons, Limited Wholesale Chemists on Currie Street. He arrived at 8am, and it was noticed straight away by his work mates, that he had with him a Lee Enfield Rifle.
Neal was known for his negative attitude, often coming across morose or depressed, and this day his co-workers noted his disposition as “unusually quiet”.
During a break, Neal made his way to Bank Street, where he stopped into a gun dealers shop and purchased 30 cartridges for his rifle.
 Lunch on Currie Street occurred for Ms Jones at 1:15pm, and on this fateful day, she found her boyfriend, someone who visited her home frequently, and who loved her very much, in the Currie street offices where she worked.
 The two were seen together talking at 1:20pm, but for the next half hour, only Hilda and Bert know what happened.
At 2pm, Mr West accountant, Mr Young, who was in his office, heard a loud crack as if from a rifle. He ran into the hallway and saw Neal, standing at the door of the office, with a rifle in his hands.
 Young asked Neal what was going on. Neal did not respond, instead, he waved frantically not to come near him, so Mr Young, ran out of the building to find a police officer to help.
 Only minutes later, Constables Easton and Stewart arrived on the scene. They headed towards Mr West’s office, and saw Neal standing in the doorway, rifle in hand. Neal dropped the rifle, and collapsed. He was taken to the Adelaide Hospital by the Constables for examination, with his only comment being “I am tired”.
Continued next week.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller.
© 2018 Allen Tiller
Bibliography on last post in series.

Hugged, Kissed and Shot: The Murder of Hilda Jones.

Hugged, Kissed and Shot: The Murder of Hilda Jones.

“Even as he kissed her ruby lips his teetering brain gave finally away,

And, a wreck at random driven, without one glimpse of reason or of heaven 

He raised his deadly rifle, raised it so that none should have her,
She never spoke, poor child.


 The smile faded from her eyes with the crumbling of her skull, 

shattered by that awful bullet, as she fell a maimed and bleeding thing upon the floor,
while he, ghastly, staring, stood over the body, 
waving intruders aside, until at last, the policeman came, and he swooned off in their arms.”

 – Truth (QLD newspaper) 15 June 1924.

On the 17th of March 1924, Hilda Jones went to work at her job at the offices of Mr W.A.A. West, Estate Agent and Horse Racing enthusiast, where she worked as a typist. The office was situated on Currie Street in Adelaide.

That same morning, Bert Neal arrived at his job at Bickford and Sons, Limited Wholesale Chemists on Currie Street. He arrived at 8am, and it was noticed straight away by his workmates, that he had with him a Lee Enfield Rifle.
Neal was known for his negative attitude, often coming across morose or depressed, and this day his co-workers noted his disposition as “unusually quiet”.
During a break, Neal made his way to Bank Street, where he stopped into a gun dealers shop and purchased 30 cartridges for his rifle.
 Lunch on Currie Street occurred for Ms Jones at 1:15pm, and on this fateful day, she found her boyfriend, someone who visited her home frequently, and who loved her very much, in the Currie Street offices where she worked.
 The two were seen together talking at 1:20pm, but for the next half hour, only Hilda and Bert know what happened.
At 2pm, Mr West accountant, Mr Young, who was in his office, heard a loud crack as if from a rifle. He ran into the hallway and saw Neal, standing at the door of the office, with a rifle in his hands.
 Young asked Neal what was going on. Neal did not respond, instead, he waved frantically not to come near him, so Mr Young, ran out of the building to find a police officer to help.
 Only minutes later, Constables Easton and Stewart arrived on the scene. They headed towards Mr West’s office and saw Neal standing in the doorway, rifle in hand. Neal dropped the rifle and collapsed. He was taken to the Adelaide Hospital by the Constables for examination, with his only comment being “I am tired”.
Continued next week.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller.
© 2018 Allen Tiller
Bibliography on last post in series.