Tag Archives: urbex

Subterranean Adelaide Part Three – The Treasury Building Tunnels

Subterranean Adelaide Part Three

The Treasury Building Tunnels
The original building of the Medina Grand Hotel, The Treasury Building of Adelaide, was first constructed in 1839, and small parts of it can still be seen in the building that stands today, although remodelling over the years have hidden much of it.
Over the following years, and especially from 1858 to 1876 construction took the building to new heights, and new lows, with long rumoured tunnels, which are no now longer a secret, with entry now easily obtainable to the general public via the Adelaide CDB Ghost Crime Tours.

For more than 150 years the Old Treasury building provided offices and administration buildings for multiple Government agencies including the Governor, The Register General and Land Office and the Colonial Secretary
The building also features the treasury vaults underneath, which during the gold rush in Victoria in 1852/1853, is where the gold from interstate was stored away safely. Nearly 13 tonnes of gold were sheltered in the tunnels in that one year period alone.
The tunnels underneath the building were actually a mishmash of various basements during the buildings various remodelling and rebuilding periods over 150 years, that were all interconnected with walkway tunnels to make it easier to move gold and important documents around much more easily.
It has been a long held belief within the Adelaide urbex explorer community that there were furnaces installed in the basement area to smelt the aforementioned gold, but this is in fact a myth. The two furnaces that are installed in the basement are not large enough to provide the required heat to smelt gold. It is thought they were installed to help with lithographic processing for the production of maps for the above survey office.
There was however evidence that smelters were installed on a ground floor level to produce smelted gold, but these have long since been removed from the site.
The “newest” tunnel was built in around 1907 to join the eastern basements built in 1867 with the new northern printing rooms built under the north wing
Presently the tunnels are used for the aforementioned Ghost Crime Tours, but also during various festivals to display artworks, or other social events.

To book an Adelaide Ghost Crime Tour and experience the tunnels for yourself, visit http://www.ghostcrimetours.com.au 

Subterranean Adelaide Part Three – The Treasury Building Tunnels

Subterranean Adelaide Part Three

The Treasury Building Tunnels

 The Treasury Building of Adelaide was first constructed in 1839, and small parts of the original building can still be seen in the edifice that stands today, although remodelling over the years has hidden much of it.
Over following decades, and especially from 1858 to 1876, construction took the building to new heights, and new lows, with long rumoured tunnels, which are now no longer a secret.

For more than 150 years the Old Treasury building provided offices and administration buildings for multiple Government agencies including The Governor, The Register General and the Land Office and the Colonial Secretary.
The building also features the treasury vaults, which during the gold rush in Victoria in 1852/1853, was where gold from interstate deposits was stored safely. Nearly 13 tonnes of gold was sheltered in the tunnels in 1853.
The tunnels underneath the building were actually a mishmash of various basements built during the buildings various remodelling and rebuilding periods over 150 years. The tunnels were interconnected with walkway tunnels to make it easier to move gold and important documents around between departments with more ease.

It has been a long-held belief within the Adelaide urbex explorer community that there were furnaces installed in the basement area to smelt gold, but this is, in fact, a myth. The two furnaces that are installed in the basement are not large enough to provide the required heat to smelt gold. It is thought they were installed to help with lithographic processing for the production of maps for the above survey office.
There is evidence that smelters were installed on a ground floor level to produce smelted gold, but these have long since been removed from the site.

The “newest” tunnel was built in around 1907 to join the eastern basement built in 1867 with the new northern printing rooms built under the north wing.

Presently the tunnels are used during various festivals to display artworks or for other social events. They can be accessed via tours held by the National Trust.

© 2015 Allen Tiller

Subterranean Adelaide Part Two – Roseneath

Subterranean Adelaide Part Two

Roseneath
Completed in 1849 in the North Adelaide suburb of Walkerville sits the stunning two storey Georgian Villa known as “Roseneath’.
The house was built for James Wyld Macdonald who was an official at the Burra Mines.
The villa was built from locally kilned bricks, and was originally surrounded y olive groves and rows of vines that flanked the main driveway to the front gates on Stephens Terrace.

At the rear of the building sites a small limestone cottage, stables and coach house that were completed sometimes around 1845

This building has a service tunnel underneath it that goes out to the servant quarters at the rear of the building. Other branches of the tunnel go into storage rooms and wine cellars. There is an old legend that there was once another tunnel that led to the River Torrens, it is speculated that this tunnel was to aide bringing water to the house, to help cool the house, and to provide an escape route if there was an attack by the local natives.

The tunnels are all bricked lined their entire length, and were constructed under the guidance of original owner James McDonald.

Want more stories?
Find exclusive stories in the book:
“The Haunts of Adelaide – History, Mystery and the Paranormal”
The first book in a series by paranormal investigator Allen Tiller
available via #Amazon and Amazon Kindle
Buy it here:

Subterranean Adelaide Part Two – Roseneath

Subterranean Adelaide Part Two

Roseneath

Completed in 1849 in the northern Adelaide suburb of Walkerville sits the stunning Georgian Villa known as “Roseneath’.
The house was built for James Wyld Macdonald who was an official at the Burra Mines.
The villa, built from locally kilned bricks was originally surrounded by olive groves and rows of grape vines that flanked the main driveway to the front gates on Stephens Terrace.

At the rear of the building sits a small limestone cottage, stables and coach house that was completed sometime around 1845.

This building has a service tunnel underneath it that extends to the servant quarters at the rear of the main building. Other branches of the tunnel go into storage rooms and wine cellars. 
 There is an old legend that there was once another tunnel from Roseneath that led to the River Torrens. It is speculated that this tunnel was to aide bringing water to the house, to help cool the house, and to provide an escape route if there was an attack by local indigenous people, or if Russians invaded Adelaide, a constant fear at the time.

The tunnels are all bricked lined their entire length and were constructed under the guidance of original owner James McDonald.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2015

Want more stories?
Find exclusive stories in the book:
“The Haunts of Adelaide – History, Mystery and the Paranormal”
The first book in a series by paranormal investigator Allen Tiller
available via #Amazon and Amazon Kindle
Buy it here:

Subterranean Adelaide – The Jubilee Railway Line

Subterranean Adelaide


The Jubilee Railway Line
One of Adelaide’s forgotten railways existed purely to service the Jubilee Exhibition that was to be located on the corners of North Terrace and Frome Road in the city
The line travelled along the River Torrens from the Adelaide Railway Station, across where the Festival Theatre now stands, under King William Street on a diagonal, besides the Torrens Parade grounds, and around to the festival grounds where the Jubilee was to be held into an area that is now part of the Adelaide University.
The line was built for the sole purpose of getting heavy machinery and exhibits through the Exhibition, and opened in 1886. It was then used for another 40 years for moving heavy objects into the pavilion of the exhibition and University buildings. Between 1899 and 1902 it was used to transport soldiers from the Torrens Parade grounds to Adelaide Station in preparation for them to catch trains from Adelaide Station to Port Adelaide and various other ports before setting sail to South Africa to face the perils of the Boer War.
The line was also used to take patients during the Spanish Influenza Epidemic of 1919 from Adelaide Station to a temporary quarantine station made of tents in the oval of the old Jubilee Exhibition grounds.
The showgrounds were moved in 1924 to their current position at Wayville, and the lines were considered redundant, so they were removed in 1927

The tunnel is still present under King William street, back was blocked on both sides in around 1928. Since then the road above has been widened multiple times, but underneath, there probably still lies some track tracks and a very short tunnel, the only remnants of the Jubilee Railway line.