Tag Archives: Tour

Kapunda – “The Hallway To Hell”


Kapunda – “The Hallway To Hell”
 
Interior of the Hallway to Hell – photo by Karen Tiller
If you’ve heard the term “Hallway to Hell” then most likely, you’ve seen Haunting: Australia episode 7: The North Kapunda Hotel, an episode that almost didn’t happen. Originally the production company was looking towards Western Australia for two episode, but when I proposed South Australia, particularly the Adelaide Arcade and Kapunda, the most haunted town in Australia, they changed their minds and went with local knowledge and a hometown story.
 If you didn’t hear about the Hallway, through Haunting: Australia, then maybe you heard about due to the Ghost Crime Tour that Karen and I brought to Kapunda. The majority of ghost tour companies in this State were too scared to touch Kapunda after all the controversy with the Warwick Moss documentary that aired in 2001, and the unaired documentary that was filmed a few years later – let me tell you, the townsfolk still haven’t forgotten who was involved!
 
 Karen and I knew that there was a right way to introduce the town to having a ghost tour, so we set up a meeting between the owners of GCT and the  Light Council, and got the ball rolling. We then invited townsfolk to see what it was all about, we introduced donations to help repair the damaged cemeteries, and slowly, the Kapunda Ghost Crime Tour was not only accepted by the Kapunda Community, but local business began to see a knock on effect from tourism.
 During our time as tour guides, Karen and I entertained Government Ministers, tourists from England who had seen the TV show, visitors from Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, and right across Australia. We did our best to keep it factual, entertaining and spooky, and to promote the town that everyone forgets!

 No-one is quite sure what year this wing of the North Kapunda hotel was built, but it is estimated to be somewhere between 1848 and 1855. It may have been earlier than 1848 though and built as part of the workers accommodation around the town by the North Kapunda Mining Company. The same company built the original structure that became the North Kapunda Arms Hotel, that in 1865, Mr Crase would build his new hotel around, and reopen as the North Kapunda Hotel.
Behind the scenes photo of Haunting: Australia – photo Karen Tiller
 The downstairs section of the hallway in 1865 contained the first official office of the newly formed Kapunda Council, until they moved to bigger premises on the Clare Road. There were also two large, ornate rooms used by Jenkins and Coles bursars who dealt with the horse sales that were held at the rear of the hotel.
During the late 1880’s, the upstairs section of the hallway was known as “The Bachelor’s Hall”, the following is a poem penned about it by one of its inhabitants 
Bachelor’s Hall.
By H. C
. DODGE.
Hurrah ! hurrah for Bachelor’s Hall;
The Queen’s away and I’m monarch of all;
I don’t have to hang up my coat or my hat,
And when I get lonely I talk to the cat.
I come when I like, and I go when I choose.
The finest cigars help me scatter the blues;
 No bundles I carry and nothing I buy;
There’s no one to care about-only big “I”
 I revel in wildest confusion around;
There isn’t a thing in its place to be found;
 My books and newspapers, they litter the room
That’ hasn’t for weeks seen the sight of abroom.
There’s clothing or something on everychair;
My bed’s never made, but it’s little I care;
I sleep like a top, for there’s no one tocall
I take solid comfort in Bachelor’s Hall.
I’ve used all the dishes and now it’s myfate
To eat, when I’m home, on the back of aplate;
I’m learning to cook, but, alas. I confess
I choose to go hungry than, swallow themess.
But, Bachelor’s Hall with its comfort andquiet,
Is almost too spooky for regular diet;
No children live in it to welcome theirdad,
No supper is waiting, no wife-O, so glad.
No! Nothing but ghosts of the loved onesaway
Inhabit this tomb where alone I must stay,
Compelled to break silence by having achat
With my woeful companion, the strange acting cat.
O, gladly I’ll yield my crown sceptre andall
The Kingly delights of a Bachelor’s Hall
To the Queen of the Home when she comeswith her train
To wisely and lovingly over me reign.
First Published in The Kapunda Herald – Tuesday 7 August 1888, page 6
The Bachelor’s Hall saw its own scandal in the 1885 when three of its inhabitants found themselves facing the magistrate at the Kapunda Courthouse for disturbing the peace.
 Murray Thomson, Robert Anderton and James Shakes Jnr. Faced the magistrate on May 12th, with Thomson and Anderton represented by Mr Glynn, and Shakes represented by Mr Benham.
 The men had been charged because someone had been firing guns in Franklin Street at about 10 past three in the morning.
Exterior – Hallway To Hell – Kapunda – photo: Allen Tiller
 The evening of the event, many people had been in town to see the bellringers entertainment, and had then retired to the North Kapunda Hotel for a supper put on by Mr Crase, which included entertainment including sing-alongs and speeches. The bar itself was closed, but the party went on in the commercial room and on the balcony.
 More than 125 gun shots were heard in Franklin Street in about a 10 minute time frame. The police tried to frame the defendants as being the guilty parties, but witnesses declared they had seen Mr Thomson in a room upstairs, light a candle and look out the window in his night clothes at the ongoing disturbance below.
 Mr Shakes wasn’t even within the town boundaries when the incident happened, so the case fell apart, instead, the Magistrate went after Mr Crase, under the guise of the act happening outside his hotel, he would be responsible for the people there. Mr Benham quickly shot down this argument as Mr Crase was entertaining upstairs privately, and may not have known who these people were, nor had they been inside his hotel drinking.
 The case was eventually thrown out of court.
Interior – Hallway to Hell – Kapunda – photo: Karen Tiller
 Interestingly though, the story that circulated through the town was slightly different to the story that surfaced in court. It would seem a number of young men had been drinking in the hotels, and had gone to the bellringers event. After the event they began walking the town trying to entertain themselves. 
 About 15 of these young men were heard in Main Street, and were asked to move on by William Thomas when they congregated in front of his bookshop, it was within the next hour the gun shots occurred in Franklin Street, which may have come about because these young men were refused entry in the North Kapunda Hotel.

Kapunda – “The Hallway To Hell”


Kapunda – “The Hallway To Hell”
 
Interior of the Hallway to Hell – photo by Karen Tiller
If you’ve heard the term “Hallway to Hell” then most likely, you’ve seen Haunting: Australia episode 7: The North Kapunda Hotel, an episode that almost didn’t happen. Originally the production company was looking towards Western Australia for two episode, but when I proposed South Australia, particularly the Adelaide Arcade and Kapunda, the most haunted town in Australia, they changed their minds and went with local knowledge and a hometown story.
 If you didn’t hear about the Hallway, through Haunting: Australia, then maybe you heard about due to the Ghost Crime Tour that Karen and I brought to Kapunda. The majority of ghost tour companies in this State were too scared to touch Kapunda after all the controversy with the Warwick Moss documentary that aired in 2001, and the unaired documentary that was filmed a few years later – let me tell you, the townsfolk still haven’t forgotten who was involved!
 
 Karen and I knew that there was a right way to introduce the town to having a ghost tour, so we set up a meeting between the owners of GCT and the  Light Council, and got the ball rolling. We then invited townsfolk to see what it was all about, we introduced donations to help repair the damaged cemeteries, and slowly, the Kapunda Ghost Crime Tour was not only accepted by the Kapunda Community, but local business began to see a knock on effect from tourism.
 During our time as tour guides, Karen and I entertained Government Ministers, tourists from England who had seen the TV show, visitors from Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, and right across Australia. We did our best to keep it factual, entertaining and spooky, and to promote the town that everyone forgets!

 No-one is quite sure what year this wing of the North Kapunda hotel was built, but it is estimated to be somewhere between 1848 and 1855. It may have been earlier than 1848 though and built as part of the workers accommodation around the town by the North Kapunda Mining Company. The same company built the original structure that became the North Kapunda Arms Hotel, that in 1865, Mr Crase would build his new hotel around, and reopen as the North Kapunda Hotel.
Behind the scenes photo of Haunting: Australia – photo Karen Tiller
 The downstairs section of the hallway in 1865 contained the first official office of the newly formed Kapunda Council, until they moved to bigger premises on the Clare Road. There were also two large, ornate rooms used by Jenkins and Coles bursars who dealt with the horse sales that were held at the rear of the hotel.
During the late 1880’s, the upstairs section of the hallway was known as “The Bachelor’s Hall”, the following is a poem penned about it by one of its inhabitants 
Bachelor’s Hall.
By H. C. DODGE.
Hurrah ! hurrah for Bachelor’s Hall;
The Queen’s away and I’m monarch of all;
I don’t have to hang up my coat or my hat,
And when I get lonely I talk to the cat.
I come when I like, and I go when I choose.
The finest cigars help me scatter the blues;
 No bundles I carry and nothing I buy;
There’s no one to care about-only big “I”
 I revel in wildest confusion around;
There isn’t a thing in its place to be found;
 My books and newspapers, they litter the room
That’ hasn’t for weeks seen the sight of abroom.
There’s clothing or something on everychair;
My bed’s never made, but it’s little I care;
I sleep like a top, for there’s no one tocall
I take solid comfort in Bachelor’s Hall.
I’ve used all the dishes and now it’s myfate
To eat, when I’m home, on the back of aplate;
I’m learning to cook, but, alas. I confess
I choose to go hungry than, swallow themess.
But, Bachelor’s Hall with its comfort andquiet,
Is almost too spooky for regular diet;
No children live in it to welcome theirdad,
No supper is waiting, no wife-O, so glad.
No! Nothing but ghosts of the loved onesaway
Inhabit this tomb where alone I must stay,
Compelled to break silence by having achat
With my woeful companion, the strange acting cat.
O, gladly I’ll yield my crown sceptre andall
The Kingly delights of a Bachelor’s Hall
To the Queen of the Home when she comeswith her train
To wisely and lovingly over me reign.
First Published in The Kapunda Herald – Tuesday 7 August 1888, page 6
The Bachelor’s Hall saw its own scandal in the 1885 when three of its inhabitants found themselves facing the magistrate at the Kapunda Courthouse for disturbing the peace.
 Murray Thomson, Robert Anderton and James Shakes Jnr. Faced the magistrate on May 12th, with Thomson and Anderton represented by Mr Glynn, and Shakes represented by Mr Benham.
 The men had been charged because someone had been firing guns in Franklin Street at about 10 past three in the morning.
Exterior – Hallway To Hell – Kapunda – photo: Allen Tiller
 The evening of the event, many people had been in town to see the bellringers entertainment, and had then retired to the North Kapunda Hotel for a supper put on by Mr Crase, which included entertainment including sing-alongs and speeches. The bar itself was closed, but the party went on in the commercial room and on the balcony.
 More than 125 gun shots were heard in Franklin Street in about a 10 minute time frame. The police tried to frame the defendants as being the guilty parties, but witnesses declared they had seen Mr Thomson in a room upstairs, light a candle and look out the window in his night clothes at the ongoing disturbance below.
 Mr Shakes wasn’t even within the town boundaries when the incident happened, so the case fell apart, instead, the Magistrate went after Mr Crase, under the guise of the act happening outside his hotel, he would be responsible for the people there. Mr Benham quickly shot down this argument as Mr Crase was entertaining upstairs privately, and may not have known who these people were, nor had they been inside his hotel drinking.
 The case was eventually thrown out of court.
Interior – Hallway to Hell – Kapunda – photo: Karen Tiller
 Interestingly though, the story that circulated through the town was slightly different to the story that surfaced in court. It would seem a number of young men had been drinking in the hotels, and had gone to the bellringers event. After the event they began walking the town trying to entertain themselves. 
 About 15 of these young men were heard in Main Street, and were asked to move on by William Thomas when they congregated in front of his bookshop, it was within the next hour the gun shots occurred in Franklin Street, which may have come about because these young men were refused entry in the North Kapunda Hotel.

Halfway Hotel – Beverly

 Halfway Hotel – Beverly
With over 165 years of history, the Halfway Hotel at Beverly is one of Adelaide’s longest licensed hotels, with only The Edinburgh Castle in Currie Street serving longer, opening it’s doors in 1837.
The hotel has no only been a favourite drinking hole, but accommodation for many weary travellers, immigrants and dignitaries coming into Adelaide.

The hotel got its name from being the halfway point for travellers coming from Port Adelaide into the City – a pretty obvious name really.
The hotel has long been rumoured to have its ghosts. Reports of strange whisperings, lights switching on and off, alarms sounding when no-one is there, and sightings of a wispy figure floating through the bar. There are even reports of bottles flying off the shelves in the drive through of their own accord.
Urban legends have grown around this pub, with one being the rumour of a man hanging himself in the cellar in an unknown year. This unreferenced event is the alleged source for all the reported goings on in the hotel, unless you talk to former staff and caretakers, who cite a former patron they have named “George”
George has been reported to have the ability to move large objects, much like a poltergeist, his biggest move was to turn all the kegs in the cellar upside down one night, which was found the following morning by staff.

George is also attributed to disembodied footsteps heard walking through various areas of the hotel, and also loves to move furniture around, rearranging whole rooms.

Although most staff agree the hotel is haunted, George is not known for being evil, vindictive or nasty, but rather he is a jokester and a friendly ghost who likes a little recognition now and then.

The Legacy of Sir Sidney Kidman

The Legacy of Sir Sidney Kidman

Tomorrow is the anniversary of the death of Sir Sidney Kidman
(1857), once Australia’s wealthiest man, and largest property owner, who conducted the worlds largest horse sale at the rear of the North Kapunda Hotel.
Kidman never swore, and instead would say “Jolly Tinkers” in the place of swears…

We thought it prudent to share some of the charities that Sir SIdney and Lady Isabel Kidman distributed their wealth too over their lifetimes, and after Sir Kidmans Death
May their legacy inspire and their memory live on….
The Will of Sir Sidney Kidman
Upon the anniversary of the death of Sir Sidney Kidman, here is a list of the benefactors of his generosity, in life, and also in death
During the First World War Sir Kidman donated 3 Ambulances, 2 Fighter Planes, 200 Horses, wool and meat for the Australian troops. He also promised all his workers who served, a job upon their return. His donations also extended to wives who lost their husband in war.
Donations were made to the Salvation Army and the Red Cross – and also the Royal Flying Doctors.
The Kidmans also donated their house and estate in Kapunda, “Eringa” to the education department in 1920 – to this day the grounds are still the Kapunda High School, with the old Manse the front office.
From Sir Kidmans Last Will and Testament:
£500 Salvation Army Adelaide
£500 Home for Incurables, Fullarton
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $45,000 today)
£250 Minda Home
£250 Adelaide’s Children Hospital
£250 The Institution for the Blind – Brighton
£250 The Protestant Children’s Home
£250 The Royal Institute for the Blind at North Adelaide
£250 The Australian Inland Mission
£250 The Adelaide Benevolent and Strangers Fund
£250 The Queens Maternity Home
£250 The Adelaide Hospital
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $22,792.68 today)
£150 Methodist Children’s Home at Magill
£150 The Angorichina Hospital for Tubercular Soldiers.
£150 The Adelaide Central Mission
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about 13,675.61 today)
£100 Kapunda Congregational Church
£100 The Kapunda Hospital
£100 The Orphan Home at Mitcham
£100 The Courthouse for Invalid children and Aged People
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $9,117.07today)
£15,000 was distributed between old employees of Sir Kidman
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $1,367,560.85 today)
Written by Allen Tiller
Calculations made via: http://www.rba.gov.au/calculator/annualPreDecimal.html

The Legacy of Sir Sidney Kidman

The Legacy of Sir Sidney Kidman

Tomorrow is the anniversary of the death of Sir Sidney Kidman
(1857), once Australia’s wealthiest man, and largest property owner, who conducted the worlds largest horse sale at the rear of the North Kapunda Hotel.
Kidman never swore, and instead would say “Jolly Tinkers” in the place of swears…

We thought it prudent to share some of the charities that Sir SIdney and Lady Isabel Kidman distributed their wealth too over their lifetimes, and after Sir Kidmans Death
May their legacy inspire and their memory live on….
The Will of Sir Sidney Kidman
Upon the anniversary of the death of Sir Sidney Kidman, here is a list of the benefactors of his generosity, in life, and also in death
During the First World War Sir Kidman donated 3 Ambulances, 2 Fighter Planes, 200 Horses, wool and meat for the Australian troops. He also promised all his workers who served, a job upon their return. His donations also extended to wives who lost their husband in war.
Donations were made to the Salvation Army and the Red Cross – and also the Royal Flying Doctors.
The Kidmans also donated their house and estate in Kapunda, “Eringa” to the education department in 1920 – to this day the grounds are still the Kapunda High School, with the old Manse the front office.
From Sir Kidmans Last Will and Testament:
£500 Salvation Army Adelaide
£500 Home for Incurables, Fullarton
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $45,000 today)
£250 Minda Home
£250 Adelaide’s Children Hospital
£250 The Institution for the Blind – Brighton
£250 The Protestant Children’s Home
£250 The Royal Institute for the Blind at North Adelaide
£250 The Australian Inland Mission
£250 The Adelaide Benevolent and Strangers Fund
£250 The Queens Maternity Home
£250 The Adelaide Hospital
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $22,792.68 today)
£150 Methodist Children’s Home at Magill
£150 The Angorichina Hospital for Tubercular Soldiers.
£150 The Adelaide Central Mission
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about 13,675.61 today)
£100 Kapunda Congregational Church
£100 The Kapunda Hospital
£100 The Orphan Home at Mitcham
£100 The Courthouse for Invalid children and Aged People
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $9,117.07today)
£15,000 was distributed between old employees of Sir Kidman
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $1,367,560.85 today)
Written by Allen Tiller
Calculations made via: http://www.rba.gov.au/calculator/annualPreDecimal.html

The Tantanoola Tiger

The Tantanoola Tiger

In the 1880’s, South-East South Australia was over run with speculation about what could be killing so many sheep in the area. Reports of a mysterious predator with stripes on it’s back began to be filed with local police. Rumour had it a large Bengal Tiger was on the loose, and soon fear spread that the wild beast may soon kill a human.

By 1893, reports were so common that they started to make it into local newspapers.

The Advertiser reported in 1895:

“The tiger is reported to have been seen again at Tantanoola.

An employee of Mr Wehl who was out hunting last week reported that he had seen a strange animal, but was some distance off and did not care to make a closer acquaintance. He, however, sent his dogs forward and says they returned in great fright.

He then proceeded homeward, believing that discretion is better than valour when an unknown danger is ahead.”

In August 1895, Thomas John Donovan managed to shoot and kill a beast thought to be the predator big cat. The animal, upon closer inspection, appeared not to be a Bengal Tiger, but resembled something closer to Tasmania’s Thylacines.

The animal was inspected by by a zoologist, and was determined to be an Arabian Wolf, which then led to a lot of speculation about why, and how, an Assyrian Wolf came to be hunting in South Australia. It is thought the Wolf may have been a passenger upon a ship that wrecked off the coastline of Robe many years earlier.

The Wolf, somewhat of a trophy, become legend – it was duly stuffed and put on display in the Tantanoola Hotel, alongside the gun used to shoot it.

The mysterious Tantanoola Tiger was dead, but sheep in the district were still going missing. This mystery was solved however when the culprit was found. A local man, Charlie Edmondson was caught red handed stealing 78 sheep, and upon arrest admitted to stealing over 4000 more!

You can see the Tantanoola Tiger in the Tantanoola Hotel in South Australia’s South East at 265 Railway Terrace East.


The Tantanoola Tiger

The Tantanoola Tiger

In the 1880’s, South-East South Australia was over run with speculation about what could be killing so many sheep in the area. Reports of a mysterious predator with stripes on it’s back began to be filed with local police. Rumour had it a large Bengal Tiger was on the loose, and soon fear spread that the wild beast may soon kill a human.

By 1893, reports were so common that they started to make it into local newspapers.

The Advertiser reported in 1895:

“The tiger is reported to have been seen again at Tantanoola.

An employee of Mr Wehl who was out hunting last week reported that he had seen a strange animal, but was some distance off and did not care to make a closer acquaintance. He, however, sent his dogs forward and says they returned in great fright.

He then proceeded homeward, believing that discretion is better than valour when an unknown danger is ahead.”

In August 1895, Thomas John Donovan managed to shoot and kill a beast thought to be the predator big cat. The animal, upon closer inspection, appeared not to be a Bengal Tiger, but resembled something closer to Tasmania’s Thylacines.

The animal was inspected by by a zoologist, and was determined to be an Arabian Wolf, which then led to a lot of speculation about why, and how, an Assyrian Wolf came to be hunting in South Australia. It is thought the Wolf may have been a passenger upon a ship that wrecked off the coastline of Robe many years earlier.

The Wolf, somewhat of a trophy, become legend – it was duly stuffed and put on display in the Tantanoola Hotel, alongside the gun used to shoot it.

The mysterious Tantanoola Tiger was dead, but sheep in the district were still going missing. This mystery was solved however when the culprit was found. A local man, Charlie Edmondson was caught red handed stealing 78 sheep, and upon arrest admitted to stealing over 4000 more!

You can see the Tantanoola Tiger in the Tantanoola Hotel in South Australia’s South East at 265 Railway Terrace East.


The Lochiel Nurse


The Lochiel Nurse
I first heard this story many years ago, and traveled up to Lochiel very early on in my career as a paranormal investigator, for a private house investigation. Whilst there I looked diligently for the vehicle that I am about to speak of, but to no avail.
Lochiel is a little town located about 125kms north of Adelaide on Highway 1. The area has an interesting history, and has been home to coal mines, wheat farmers and the salt farmers, who collect salt from Bumbunga Lake Nearby.…the area even spawned the micro nation of “The Province of Bumbunga”
Many years ago, Lochiel used to have its own town ambulance, an old 60’s style machine that saw many many years of service. Often patients would get to hospital and ask who the nurse was that had

been caring for them, as she seemed a little old fashioned, and wore a uniform that seemed out of date and very much unlike modern nurses uniforms. Of course the driver and attendants would have no clue what the patient was talking about – but over the years it happened so often it could no longer be ignored – however, no-one ever solved the mystery of who the nurse could be, or why she chose to help the people of Lochiel.

 I heard many years ago that the ambulance in question was put into retirement a long time ago, and sat in the yard of local for many years – I have no clue to its where about today, but would love to know what happened too it. So if you know, or you experienced a ride with this ghostly nurse, please feel free to drop me a line at eidolon@live.com.au

The Ghost of the Lochiel Nurse


The Ghost of the Lochiel Nurse

I first heard this story many years ago, and travelled up to Lochiel very early on in my career as a paranormal investigator, for a private house investigation. Whilst there I looked diligently for the vehicle that I am about to speak of but to no avail.
Lochiel is a little town located about 125kms north of Adelaide on Highway 1. The area has an interesting history and has been home to coal mines, wheat farmers and the salt farmers, who collect salt from Bumbunga Lake Nearby.…the area even spawned the micronation of “The Province of Bumbunga”
Many years ago, Lochiel used to have its own town ambulance, an old 60’s style machine that saw many many years of service. Often patients would get to the hospital and ask who the nurse was that had

been caring for them, as she seemed a little old fashioned, and wore a uniform that seemed out of date and very much, unlike modern nurses uniforms. Of course, the driver and attendants would have no clue what the patient was talking about – but over the years it happened so often it could no longer be ignored – however, no-one ever solved the mystery of who the nurse could be, or why she chose to help the people of Lochiel.

 I heard many years ago that the ambulance in question was put into retirement a long time ago, and sat in the yard of local for many years – I have no clue to its whereabouts today, but would love to know what happened too it. So if you know, or you experienced a ride with this ghostly nurse, please feel free to drop me a line at eidolon@live.com.au

© 2015 Allen Tiller

Dead Dog Creek

Dead Dog Creek

 

In 1868, Benjamin Ellis was a local dog catcher employed the by the Corporation of Adelaide (Adelaide Council). He was given carte blanche to shoot any unlicensed dog he found in the city boundaries and dispose of them as he saw fit.
Either lacking a good burial site, or just being plain lazy, Mr Ellis decided it was perfectly fine to dispose of the dogs bodies under a bridge in the Adelaide Botanic Gardens.
The little bridge, which crossed a little creek, was near the rear entrance of the gardens, and was often used by the public. The smell was overwhelming, and complaints began to come into the main office of the gardens. Doctor Schomburgk inspected the bridge and counted 13 dead dogs – he quickly wrote a letter of disgust to Mr Ellis – and the dead dogs soon ceased to be left in the gardens.

The following story was printed in Adelaide Observer April 11th1868
From Dr. Schomburgk, stating that the person employed by the Corporation for killing dogs threw the carcases in the creek below the Botanic Garden, I and requesting that the nuisance might be removed.
In reply, Benjamin Ellis wrote, admitting that some dogs had been thrown there, but that since the complaint he had removed them.
His Worship said the Act distinctly required that the carcases should be buried. Mr. Sundry considered that Mr. Ellis was deserving of severe censure; but he apprehended he was employed by the Registrar of Dogs.
The Town Clerk, in reply to Mr. Bundey, said the man had received fees for the dogs upon making declaration that they were buried.
Mr. Bundey considered certainly some steps should be taken, and if the thing was brought before the Council again he would see that steps were taken to prosecute the party for obtaining money under false pretences.
His Worship pointed out that according to the Act the fee was only to be paid on a declaration being made such as to satisfy a Justice of the Peace. Then, if the man committed perjury, he could be prosecuted.
The Council resolved that no fees be paid without a certificate from a Justice of the Peace

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