Tag Archives: research

Paranormal Research: National Library of Australia’s TROVE (Part 2) – Advanced Search

Paranormal Research: National Library of Australia’s TROVE (Part 1)

“Advanced Search”
Prior post on this topic:
Manning Index of South Australia
Trove Part 1

Head to Trove at this location: https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/search?adv=y

Now, just under the search window is a couple of checkboxes, which let us search Australian content only or through library holdings, but let’s go to the last option though, ‘Advanced Search’.



This search window allows us to search in another way that can be much more helpful than basic newspaper search.


 In the top search box:  “All of these words” window, lets type in “Adelaide Arcade” in inverted commas.

In the box “Any of these Words” window lets type in ‘Murder, Suicide, death, crime’ – then hit search



Trove has now searched every newspaper in its catalogue for the term ‘Adelaide Arcade’, and the terms we used. As you will see in your results, there is now a ton of deaths, crimes and suicides to look through for this one location – including the death of Sydney Byron Kennedy and a number of others.
For the murder of Florence Horton, which happened at the Rundle Mall end of The Adelaide Arcade, we would change our search to “Rundle Street” instead of “Adelaide Arcade” in inverted commas, as her death, and subsequent haunting of the Arcade were reported as a crime on the street rather than in the Arcade.

Let’s just jump back to our Advanced search window, in the top search “All of these words” write “Adelaide” in inverted commas, in the “Any of these words” section type;  ‘ghosts, paranormal.’ Now in our “Without these words” window we will type;  ‘theatre, movie’. then press “search”


We’ll refine a little more by selecting South Australia from our “place” limiter and now we have a ton of reports of ghosts, and UFO’s from South Australia.


If we scroll down to number 8 “Ghosts and Skeletons” you will see one of the stories I used, as a jump-off point for more research for my book The Haunts of Adelaide, which involves Sir Arthur Conan Doyle looking for a photo of a skeleton displayed in Rundle Street Adelaide.


As you can see we get a lot of newspaper stories, some are about published poems, but many are local ghost sightings.

Next Week: How to Reference your book, blog or writing using Trove.


Because of the layout of Blogger, I cannot add the content of this talk in its entirety in one blog post. This transcript was originally presented as an interactive video presentation at the City Library in Adelaide and does not transcribe well to this format.
 Next week I will look at Advanced searching options on Trove.

© 2017 – Allen Tiller – originally presented by Allen Tiller as part of the ‘Haunted Buildings in Adelaide’ – Paranormal historian in residence project at the Adelaide City Libraries in conjunction with the City of Adelaide.

Paranormal Research: National Library of Australia’s TROVE (Part 1) – Basic Search

Paranormal Research: National Library of Australia’s TROVE (Part 1) – Basic Search


www.trove.nla.gov.au
Prior Posts related to this Blog:
Paranormal Research: The Manning Index of South Australian History
Trove is one of the biggest public databases in Australia, it contains more than 370 million resources, spread across ten content zones which includes: Books,  Photos, Journals, Newspapers, Government Gazettes, Music, Maps, Diaries and Letters, Archived Websites, People, and Lists.

The focus here is on content in digitised newspapers. (Trove also supplies a specific section with  information about searching newspapers.)

1. In this exercise, we are going to enter the term “Death of the Arcade Beadle” in inverted commas into the search bar. And hit enter, we can see our entry from the Manning index in slot two (see prior blog post The Manning Index )…



now let’s find it without the inverted commas. As you can see in the example below, we now have a ton of related content spread across all States and various newspapers. What we want to do now is to refine our search


Example 1
2. The easiest way to refine our search: we know that the newspaper we are looking for is from South Australia, so in the first left-hand side drop-down menu we choose South Australia – we then skip the newspapers and go straight to category – we know it’s an article, so we click that option. (see example 1)



























Example 2
3. Next, we click “Decade” and scroll down to 1880-1890, which gives us 29 options of newspaper to read through, all from 1887. Our particular newspaper is second on the list, so we can click it and read it if we like. (example 2)











  From here, we can do many things, we can look through the various newspapers, most of which are the same, we could open up our search to the whole nation, which is sometimes useful because you will find that the newspapers in the state where an accident or crime happens will sanitise their stories so as not to offend the family, so an interstate newspaper may have a more in-depth story about the death or crime you are researching.

Because of the layout of Blogger, I cannot add the content of this talk in its entirety in one blog post. This transcript was originally presented as an interactive video presentation at the City Library in Adelaide and does not transcribe well to this format.
 Next week I will look at Advanced searching options on Trove.

© 2017 – Allen Tiller – originally presented by Allen Tiller as part of the ‘Haunted Buildings in Adelaide’ – Paranormal historian in residence project at the Adelaide City Libraries in conjunction with the City of Adelaide.

Paranormal Research: The Manning Index of South Australian History

Paranormal Research:

The Manning Index of South Australian History

What is the Manning Index?

  The Manning Index is a database of South Australian history, owned by the State Library of South Australia. The Manning Index is an index of Adelaide newspapers from 1837 through to 1937, together with extracts from the published works of G.H. Manning, and essays written from 1982-2002.
It also contains a list of place names in South Australia.
The index is incredibly useful to paranormal researchers as it allows us to find significant information about crimes or deaths or facts about a location. It gives us the newspaper, the date, and the page of the newspaper so we can then go to the National Library of Australia’s, “Trove” newspapers section < https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/?q= > to cross reference our research or find the article in its entirety.
  The index also overlaps with the State Library Of South Australia’s catalogue to some extent, and features many of the newspapers available in the State Library, such as: Adelaide Times, The Advertiser, The Chronicle, The Critic, Express & Telegraph, Frearson’s Weekly, The Herald, Illustrated Adelaide Post, The Irish Harp, The Lantern, The Mail, The News, Observer, Register, SA Gazette & Mining Journal and the Southern Australian.
  The index is divided into four folders, which can be found in the top left-hand corner of your screen, these folders are:
  1. South Australia: includes coverage of a number of ‘State level’ topics.
  2. Adelaide: includes a number of topics which predominately relate to the city and the metropolitan area as a whole.
  3. Port Adelaide:  includes references to Port Adelaide.
  4. Place Names of South Australia: an alphabetical list of South Australian place names (including suburbs of Adelaide).

  Each folder contains several sub-folders, which themselves may contain more subfolders.
Some subjects are indexed extensively in more than one section. Generally, biographical references can be found on pages dealing with the place or activity a person is associated with. A few place-names also contain obituaries of people associated with the place name.
ALL place names are inverted, so ‘Mount Gambier’ will be found as ‘Gambier, Mount’.
There are two ways to use the Manning Index:
 You have the option to search via the “Searching folder”, which allows you to search the State Library Catalogue and the Manning Index.
  If you click on the yellow folder, you will see both options. If you click on the Manning Index subfolder, you will see it takes us to a Google search engine.
  If you write Adelaide Arcade in the provided search engine, and press search, you will see that it brings up everything with the words “Adelaide” and “Arcade”.
To make your search more specific we can add inverted commas to the search; “Adelaide Arcade”. We now get three results. If you look to the right-hand side of the screen you will see a drop-down menu that says “sort by” which allows us to look at our findings via relevance or date.
  The second way to use the Manning index, assumes you know a little something about your topic already. We know that the Adelaide Arcade is in Adelaide, and is a building.
  Go to the yellow ‘Adelaide’Folder and click it. Scroll down the list and find the subfolder, “Buildings”and click on it. Next, we see a list of buildings, written in blue.
 The Adelaide Arcade stands by itself, whereas other buildings are grouped into types. If we click the Adelaide Arcade hyperlink, we are giving a small list of pages where the Arcade is mentioned in local newspapers.
We can make note of these newspapers as a starting point for our next searchable index, the National Library of Australia’s Trove. So you can either write them down, highlight them with your mouse and copy and paste them into a Word File, or screen capture them for later reference:
Adelaide Arcade
Sketches of the Adelaide Arcade are in the Pictorial Australian in
August 1885 (supplement),
January 1886, page 12.
Also see Register,
30 April 1885, page 6g,
1, 14 and 15 December 1885, pages 7a, 4h-5b-6e and 6g, 
Express,
7 May 1885, page 4a,
12 and 14 December 1885, pages 3f and 3g,
17 December 1895, page 4c. 
“Death of the Arcade Beadle” is in the Observer,
25 June 1887, page 27a.
For more info on Geoffery Manning
for a photo of Geoffery Manning:  
Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2017, for the ‘Haunted Buildings in Adelaide’ research project at the City of Adelaide Libraries.

The Haunts of Adelaide is 7 Years Old Today!

The Haunts of Adelaide is 7 Years Old Today!

Today, the 22nd of October 2019, marks 7 years since I began writing this blog. So to mark the occasion today, I am going to link back to the seven most popular blog posts
1. Muzyk Murder – Unfortunately the most read blog post on The Haunts of Adelaide is the story of the horrific murder of Tracy Muzyk in 1996. 
2. Para Para House – the second most popular blog post is a story of a mansion in Gawler West:
3. Woodhouse Activity Centre is the third most read blog post on The Haunts of Adelaide. While the story is brief in this post, a future post or possible book story will go into greater detail about the alleged ghosts
4. A former convalescent home for children at Grange is the 4th most popular Blog. Estcourt House was built in 1883 and used as a hospital, today it is a private home.
5. The Adelaide Central Markets make it into 5th spot with a ghost story about a security guard who claimed to witness strange goings-on in the Adelaide icon.
6. In the 6th spot, we have a hometown haunt: Dead Man’s Pass at Gawler. I grew up playing in this reserve as a child and know its stories, its nooks and crannies, and still to this day enjoy exploring this location.
7. The seventh most read blog post is “Sinister by Design: Part 2: Carclew House”. Since writing this post way back in 2012, I have visited Carclew many times and learned a great deal more about its history and alleged hauntings! look for new stories in future publications
A big thank you to each and every one of you that has taken the time to read, share or interact with this blog. I enjoy researching history, I enjoy telling stories, and I started writing this blog purely for my own interest, so its a blessing for me that so many people have come to read this blog.
Allen Tiller

The Miners Home Hotel – Armagh


 

The Miners Home Hotel – Armagh
The tiny hamlet of Armagh, north-west of the township of Clare in South Australia is thought to have been founded by Irish Catholics who arrived in the area in the 1840’s.[1]It is not known who exactly named the region, but it is thought, one of three people, Patrick Butler, E.B. Gleeson or Henry Clark may have named the valley after their home town in Ireland.[2]

The Royal Mining Company, on the hunt for copper, opened the Emu Plains Mine in the area. As part of their prospective of the area, and in the hope of a mining boom, they planned the town of Armagh, with provisions for a school, a church, blacksmiths shop, and two hotels.

In 1849 John and William Day, hoping to profit from the opening of a new mine built the Miner’s Home Hotel. At the same time, Patrick Butler built his own hotel, named the Emu Inn.
 Only one license was granted by the Bench of Magistrates, which went to Patrick Butler’s hotel. The Day’s then launched an appeal, and sought signatures from friends of influence, which saw the Magistrate board overturn their ruling, granting a license to the brothers to operate their hotel[3]

The Miners Home Hotel operated for only two years, 1850 until 1851. The license changed from John Day, to his brother William in 1851.[4]

After the closing of the hotel, the land was bought by Patrick Butler, who lived in the building, and built a larger house on the land. Patrick Butler went on to become a Councillor in the Clare region, but perhaps one of his bigger claims to fame was in 1844, when the then Archbishop of Adelaide, Dr Murphy, assisted by Father Michael Ryan, celebrated the Mass in the Clare district at the Butler residence.

It is claimed that in 1870 the body of a seven-year-old girl was found to be laid to rest under the bar of the old hotel. A headstone now sits in the floor, marking the spot where she is buried.

In recent times, the
old house has been a museum, and now, again a private residence.

 For almost twenty years, from around 1850 until 1870, it was thought the hotel was cursed with a haunting. It is claimed that horses would not enter the property at all, and this led to the closing of the original hotel.
 It is also claimed that poltergeist activity was a regular occurrence in the building, with objects being moved around inside, in full view of the occupants. All poltergeist activity is said to have ceased upon the discovery of the little girl’s body buried underneath the old hotel bar.

How she came to be laid to rest there is still, to this day, a mystery!
© Allen Tiller 2017
Bibliography
[1] “Armagh South,” Irish Place Names in Australia, accessed July 14, 2017, http://irishplaces.flinders.edu.au/items/show/184.

[1] 1850 ‘LOCAL NEWS.’, South Australian Gazette and Mining Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1847 – 1852), 19 December, p. 3. , viewed 15 Jul 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article195941359

[1] 1851 ‘BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.—QUARTERLY ISSUE OF LICENCES.’, South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 – 1900), 10 June, p. 3. , viewed 15 Jul 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38450812

[1] Australian Heritage Places Inventory, 2017, Dwelling and Museum (former Miner’s Home Hotel & Outbuilding), SA State Heritgae Register, viewed 15 July 2017, https://dmzapp17p.ris.environment.gov.au/ahpi/action/search/heritage-search/record/SA13052

1852 ‘LOCAL COURT, CLARE.’, South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 – 1900), 18 October, p. 3. , viewed 15 Jul 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38459187

1943 ‘LINKS with THE PAST and Historical Notes.’, Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 – 1954), 12 November, p. 4. , viewed 15 Jul 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97266692

Branson, Vern M & Phillips, Arthur, 1938- 1974, Clare and district sketchbook, Rigby, Adelaide

Broad, Sue 1986, Back to Armagh, Armagh Soldiers Memorial Hall Inc. Committee, [Armagh, S. Aust.]


The Miners Home Hotel – Armagh


 

The Miners Home Hotel – Armagh
The tiny hamlet of Armagh, north-west of the township of Clare in South Australia is thought to have been founded by Irish Catholics who arrived in the area in the 1840s.[1] It is not known who exactly named the region, but it is thought, one of three people, Patrick Butler, E.B. Gleeson or Henry Clark may have named the valley after their home town in Ireland.[2]

The Royal Mining Company, on the hunt for copper, opened the Emu Plains Mine in the area. As part of their prospects of the area, and in the hope of a mining boom, they planned the town of Armagh, with provisions for a school, a church, blacksmiths shop, and two hotels.

In 1849 John and William Day, hoping to profit from the opening of a new mine built the Miner’s Home Hotel. At the same time, Patrick Butler built his own hotel, named the Emu Inn.
 Only one license was granted by the Bench of Magistrates, which went to Patrick Butler’s hotel. The Day’s then launched an appeal and sought signatures from friends of influence, which saw the Magistrate board overturn their ruling, granting a license to the brothers to operate their hotel[3]

The Miners Home Hotel operated for only two years, 1850 until 1851. The license changed from John Day to his brother William in 1851.[4]

After the closing of the hotel, the land was bought by Patrick Butler, who lived in the building and built a larger house on the land. Patrick Butler went on to become a Councillor in the Clare region, but perhaps one of his bigger claims to fame was in 1844, when the then Archbishop of Adelaide, Dr Murphy, assisted by Father Michael Ryan, celebrated the Mass in the Clare district at the Butler residence.

It is claimed that in 1870 the body of a seven-year-old girl was found to be laid to rest under the bar of the old hotel. A headstone now sits in the floor, marking the spot where she is buried.

In recent times, the old house has been a museum, and now, again a private residence.

 For almost twenty years, from around 1850 until 1870, it was thought the hotel was cursed with a haunting. It is claimed that horses would not enter the property at all, and this led to the closing of the original hotel.
 It is also claimed that poltergeist activity was a regular occurrence in the building, with objects being moved around inside, in full view of the occupants. All poltergeist activity is said to have ceased upon the discovery of the little girl’s body buried underneath the old hotel bar.

How she came to be laid to rest there is still, to this day, a mystery!
© Allen Tiller 2017
Bibliography
[1] “Armagh South,” Irish Place Names in Australia, accessed July 14, 2017, http://irishplaces.flinders.edu.au/items/show/184.

[1] 1850 ‘LOCAL NEWS.’, South Australian Gazette and Mining Journal (Adelaide, SA: 1847 – 1852), 19 December, p. 3. , viewed 15 Jul 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article195941359

[1] 1851 ‘BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.—QUARTERLY ISSUE OF LICENCES.’, South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA: 1839 – 1900), 10 June, p. 3. , viewed 15 Jul 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38450812

[1] Australian Heritage Places Inventory, 2017, Dwelling and Museum (former Miner’s Home Hotel & Outbuilding), SA State Heritage Register, viewed 15 July 2017, https://dmzapp17p.ris.environment.gov.au/ahpi/action/search/heritage-search/record/SA13052

1852 ‘LOCAL COURT, CLARE.’, South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA: 1839 – 1900), 18 October, p. 3. , viewed 15 Jul 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38459187

1943 ‘LINKS with THE PAST and Historical Notes.’, Northern Argus (Clare, SA: 1869 – 1954), 12 November, p. 4. , viewed 15 Jul 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97266692

Branson, Vern M & Phillips, Arthur, 1938- 1974, Clare and district sketchbook, Rigby, Adelaide

Broad, Sue 1986, Back to Armagh, Armagh Soldiers Memorial Hall Inc. Committee, [Armagh, S. Aust.]


Gawler -“Flying Saucer”

Gawler -“Flying Saucer”

In 1954 Gawler experienced its first publicly reported “Flying Saucer” report. On Wednesday the 20thof January 1954 Mrs J Tait was at her home south of the Gawler Racecourse. At about 11:20am she witnessed and Unidentified Flying Object flying at incredible height and speed over the foothills to the South East.
Mrs Tait was not alone, her daughter, Rotha and Rotha’s school friends, Shirley Struck were also present. The incredible noise the object was making had made them come outside to see what all the fuss was about.
The object, which at first resembled a feather, soon too on the shape of a saucer. It sped through the air at “great height and speed” and was “pure white”. It remained in the air for a very brief amount of time before it shot off at incredible speed in a south westerly direction.
15 minutes later a jet plane flew across the sky heading in the same direction as the UFO.
The RAAF was contacted and they stated they had indeed sent a jet aircraft off at the time stated. The Jet was doing around 600MPH at 10, 000 feet.
Another witness, Mrs W.C. Harrington of Gawler South also the flying object.

When presented with the RAAF’s opinion of it being a jet, Mrs Tait Stated that she is perfectly sure that the first object did not resemble and aircraft in the slightest. The first object was round and second object was easily identifiable as a jet air-plane

Gawler -“Flying Saucer”

Gawler -“Flying Saucer”


In 1954 the town of Gawler, South Australia reported its first publicly witnessed ‘Flying Saucer’. 

On Wednesday the 20th of January 1954, Mrs J Tait was at her home south of the Gawler Racecourse. At about 11:20am she witnessed an Unidentified Flying Object flying at incredible height and speed over the foothills to the South East.

Mrs Tait was not alone, her daughter, Rotha and Rotha’s school friend, Shirley Struck were also present and witnessed the same unidentified object. The object made an incredible sound, which triggered the curiosity of the witnesses, so they headed outside the home to see what the noise could be coming from.

The object, which at first resembled a feather, soon took on the shape of a saucer. It sped through the air at “great height and speed” and was “pure white”. It remained in the air for a very brief amount of time before it shot off at incredible speed in a southwesterly direction.
15 minutes later a jet plane flew across the sky heading in the same direction as the UFO.

The RAAF was contacted by a local UFO investigator to confirm witness accounts. The RAAF stated they had indeed sent a jet aircraft off at the time stated. The jet was doing around 600MPH at 10, 000 feet.

Another witness, Mrs W.C. Harrington of Gawler South also the flying object from a different viewpoint. Her report was consistent with other witness reports.

When presented with the RAAF’s opinion of it being simply a jet, Mrs Tait stated that she is perfectly sure that the first object did not resemble an aircraft in the slightest. The first object was round and the second object was easily identifiable as a jet aeroplane!

Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2014

CHRISTMAS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA 1880

CHRISTMAS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA 1880

Christmas Eve, tonight an excerpt from what Christmas was like in Adelaide back in 1880, taken from “The South Australian Register” – Monday 27 December 1880

Christchurch Kapunda 1895 – Christmas Eve

CHRISTMAS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Englishmen are proverbially conservative, and wherever they make their home they seem inclined to retain as far as possible the customs of their native land. In these Australian colonies, however, with the sun registering 100s Fahrenheit, or thereabouts, in the Sun, it would be simple folly to attempt to keep Christmas in the old-fashioned style — to the accompaniment of the blazing Yale-log, the steaming plum pudding, and the heated wassail bowl.

Instead of families gathering around the chimney-corner with the house doors closed and a large crackling fire in every room, the majority of the people of Adelaide seem to turn out on Christmas Eve to see the  street decorations to purchase presents on behalf of the good Santa Claus, and to prepare for the outdoor recrcation or the religious services of the morrow.

Whatever Australians do in regard to holiday-making they always do heartily and well. There is no wonder, therefore, that Christmas time is ever with us a time of general rejoicing Old Father Christmas may not come to us in the same garb as he does to the dwellers in England, where fancy always invests him with holly branches and mistletoe and sees him surrounded by flakes of falling snow.

 When we know that we shall be introduced to him under a blazing sun, or with the thermometer registering 90° or 100° in the shade, we prepare to meet him at picnics, excursions by land or by sea, in garden parties, or in other outdoor scenes of recreation and reunion. But Christmas is none tho less welcome because he comes unattended by fogs and snow and frost. The Christmas spirit is tho tame, and will be so long as the day is honoured, and as the human heart is mored by joys and sorrows.

Throughout this colony, as throughout the rest of the Christian world, Christmas Day is probably the gladdest day of the year. It is the day when men felt it a duty to be happy, and when that spirit which blesses him. That gives end him that receives is most largely exercised. The general rejoicing over flows in all directions, and for one day at least in the year the inmates of our hospitals, asylums, and prisons are made to feel that they are not entirely forgotten by the great world outside. On Christmas Eve and morning rarely do no carol singers parade the streets to bid’
“Christians awake, salute the happy morn.’

 No ‘waits’ go from door to door, arousing sleepers, and informing them the time by the clock and the kind of weather at the time. But instead of this on Christmas Eve the Town Hall bells ring out a merry peal to welcome merry Christmas in, and all night long the main thoroughfares are crowded by men, women, and children, who promenade the streets hour after hour gazing upon one another, making purchases, or seeking to catch the inspiration of the time. All vehicle traffic was stopped from east to west in the western half of Rundle-street on Friday evening last, the tramcars being of course allowed to go out to the eastern suburbs, and to return via Grenfell-street as usual. The street decorations were as profuse as we have ever known them before, branches of pines, of gums, and of other trees being need wherever possible, either on shop fronts or on verandah-posts.
 Any one looking down one of the main streets and seeing the abundant foliage might have been pardoned for adopting Macbeth’s idea, if not his precise language, and asking what woods had come- there and wherefore had the; come.
 The ornamentation of individual shops was not as conspicuously excellent or as striking as we have seen some on previous occasions, bat a few of the grocers, butchers, fruiterers, and poulterers made good displays.
  The fruit shops were especially gay with the luscious-looking fruit offered for sale, and here, and in toy shops and drapers’ establishments, there were crowds of people gathered all Friday evening. Two of the hotels—the York and the Imperial— had gas illuminations in front of their premises, and Chinese lanterns and many lesser lights were to be seen at intervals all along Rundle and Hindley streets.
 The effect was very pretty, and the pedestrians seemed as if they would never tire of promenading or of watching the Lightning Calculator and other wonder-workers who engaged the attention of large crowds of people in side streets and alleys off the main thorough fares. To the eyes of a visitor from the old country, the decorations of the streets would create great surprise. Scarcely any holly is used, and the mistletoe is rarely seen.

 Instead of these things, branches of eucalypti and other indigenous trees are used, and what the decorations lack in minuteness of detail and artistic finish they certainly make up in quantity. Cherries supply the place of holly berries and the rose takes the place of the mistletoe— for, as the Rev. Charles Clark used to say, Australian young ladies do not object to being kissed ‘ under the rose ‘instead of beneath the mistletoe. The decorations are by no means confined to the main streets. If every house does not show its sprig of holly, every horse carries its bit of foliage, and every vehicle, from the tramcars to the perambulator, is more or less adorned by leaves, or sprigs, or branches of trees. Christmas Day is always observed as a dose holiday in Adelaide. No ordinary business is transacted, except, perhaps, by the owners of vehicles and the occupiers of public-houses.

The publication of the daily newspapers even is suspended, either on Christmas or the following day and for twenty-four hours the news goes by word-of-mouth, as it did in tbe days before Dick Steele started his ‘ Tatler’ and Addison began to show the follies of the society of his day. Bat Christmas Day is by no means generally observed as a day for religions worship. There are services at a few of the churches perhaps, and the South Australian Sunday-school Union assembles its children in the Town Hall for the usual Christmas morning service of song. But this begins at 9 o’clock and is over in an hour so that it shall not unduly interfere with the full enjoyment of a day of recreation.

 Mr Chief-Justice Way presided at the Sunday-school gathering in the Town Hall this year, and the Rev. W. K. Fletcher, ALA., delivered the address to the children. Special hymns were sung, as usual, each having some relation to the Natal Day of Him who was born in Bethlehem. In the evening a grand mass, composed by Mons. Meilhan was performed in the Town Hall, in the presence of a large audience.
The places of public amusement were closed on Christmas Day, but on the previous night, a new pantomime was produced at the Theatre Royal, while at the Academy of Music there were some special attractions in honour of the season. On Christmas Day, notwithstanding the intense heat, tens of thousands of people left the city either by the railways to the Bay and the Semaphore or to some of the shady nooks and glens among our ever-new and ever-beautiful Mount Lofty hills.

SA Christmas card – notice the  “West End” wheels 🙂

Merry Christmas Everyone!

© 2013 Allen Tiller