Tag Archives: Premonition

A Black Mass at North Adelaide.

A Black Mass at North Adelaide.

The Haunts of Adelaide  This remarkable eyewitness account was published in the Evening Journal newspaper in 1904.
  A person identifying themselves as only “B.S.S.” witnessed an apparition of a funeral near the corner of Barnard Street some years prior and recounted it for the newspaper.
 The witness had walked down Molesworth Street, along Hill Street, and when at the corner of Barnard Street, near the hospital, witnessed an intensely black shape moving in the street. On this night, a very well-known lady in the area, lay dying in the Calvary Hospital just metres away from where the witness was standing.
 The witness watched on as the black shape paused in the road, then marched onto vacant land nearby. Walking closer to get a better view, the witness realised it was a funeral procession occurring in the night in front of them. A coffin, covered in black velvet was being held by four men, while two walked in front, and four behind. All the men wore ‘hose and doublet’, small cloaks or capes, swords at their sides and feather in their caps.
 The funeral procession stopped. They turned back to towards the hospital, and slowly vanished as they returned toward it, and where the dying woman lay.

 The women would not die, and in her final hours, called desperately for her individual ancestors. Was it them, dressed in black, bearing swords and the holding the coffin, or was it death coming to collect his dues?

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2019

Bibliography

1904 ‘GHOSTS, OR WHAT:’, Evening Journal, 18 October, p. 1. , viewed 22 Apr 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article200827889

AN ADELAIDE GHOST STORY.

AN ADELAIDE GHOST STORY.

In 1868, Mr Cleary a sailor on the sailing ship “Persian Empire”, which was about to leave Port in Adelaide for London suffered terrible dreams about his death at sea.
He dreamt of upcoming Christmas Day, being out at sea and nearing Cape Horn. Cleary and the rest of his watch were ordered to secure a boat hanging in the davits during a heavy gale. He and another sailor got into the boat when a fearful sea broke over the ship, washing them both out of the boat into the sea, where they were both drowned.
On Christmas Eve, the Persian Empire neared Cape Horn and Cleary’s dream that night was identical to the first time he had had it, clearly an omen about his impending death, the poor man became distraught with worry. He screamed in horror at the thought of it, and was heard muttering “I know it will come true!”
Christmas Day, and Cleary’s dream particulars started to become reality, exactly as he had foreseen, Cleary and his watch were ordered to secure a boat hanging in the davits. Clearly flatly refused.
He was summoned to the lower decks and the Captains Quarters, where he stated that he had refused as he knew he would drown if he went down into that boat. His refusal to discharge duty was noted in the ships log, the Chief Duty Officer, Mr Douglas, went to sign the paperwork, and Clearly exclaimed “I will go do my duty, for now I know the other man in my dream!”.
The two men walked back up on deck, and Clearly explained his dream to Douglas, who listened intently, never uttering a word.

They got into the boat, and when they were all making fast a heavy sea struck the vessel with such force that the watch crew would have been washed overboard had they not clung to the mast. The boat was turned over, and Douglas and Cleary were flung into the sea. They swam for a little time and then went down. It was just three months after Cleary had dreamt of his death before leaving Adelaide.  

© 2007 – 2014 Allen Tiller

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AN ADELAIDE GHOST STORY.

AN ADELAIDE GHOST STORY.

  In 1868, Mr Cleary, a sailor on the sailing ship “Persian Empire”, which was about to leave Port Adelaide for London, suffered terrible dreams about his death at sea.
  He dreamed of upcoming Christmas Day, being out at sea and nearing Cape Horn. Cleary and the rest of his watch were ordered to secure a boat hanging in the davits during a heavy gale. He and another sailor got into the boat when a fearful sea broke over the ship, washing them both out of the boat into the sea, where they were both drowned.

  On Christmas Eve, the Persian Empire neared Cape Horn and Cleary’s dream that night was identical to the first time he had had it. Clearly an omen about his impending death, the poor man became distraught with worry. He screamed in horror at the thought of it, and was heard muttering “I know it will come true!”

  Christmas Day; Cleary’s dream particulars started to become reality, exactly as he had foreseen. Cleary and his watch were ordered to secure a boat hanging in the davits. Clearly flatly refused.
He was summoned to the lower decks and the Captains Quarters, where he stated that he had refused as he knew he would drown if he went down into that boat.
 His refusal to discharge his duty was noted in the ships log. The Chief Duty Officer, Mr Douglas, went to sign the paperwork, and Clearly exclaimed: “I will go do my duty, for now I know the other man in my dream!”.

The two men walked back up on deck, and Clearly explained his dream to Douglas, who listened intently, never uttering a word.

  They got into the boat, and when they were all making fast, a heavy sea struck the vessel with such force that the watch crew would have been washed overboard had they not clung to the mast. The boat was turned over, and Douglas and Cleary were flung into the sea. They swam for as long as they could but were soon overcome, drowning at sea.

It was just three months after Cleary had dreamt of his death before leaving Adelaide.  

© 2007 – 2014 Allen Tiller