Tag Archives: north adelaide

Mendelsham Robe Terrace Medindie

Mendelsham “Stonehenge” Robe Terrace Medindie

 Designed by iconic South Australian architect; John Quinton Bruce for Fred Scarfe, A Director of South Australian department store icon, Harris Scarfe’s, ‘Stonehenge’, as the building was named, is a beautiful building located just north of Adelaide on Robe Terrace at Medindie.

 Often it is reported that Frederick Norman Scarfe, former Mayor of Kensington and Norwood is the man who had the building erected, but by the time it was built, Frederick was a very old man.    Frederick George Alexander Scarfe is the man who built the impressive house, he was a director of Harris Scarfe’s at the time, and a very wealthy individual.

 The building consists of 15 main rooms and includes a gracious reception hallway and a sweeping grand staircase. There is also a ballroom, a formal lounge-room, a library and a formal dining room, plus five bedrooms and a wine cellar.

  The house was often featured in local newspaper stories as Mr Scarfe would host events at his home. Scarfe was well known for throwing grand balls and parties, in which Adelaide’s elite would gather.

  In 1919 Frederick Scarfe sold the house for an impressive sum, citing in advertisements that he found the housekeeping tasks laborious, with it being such a large manner. Scarfe was not keen on paying maids or cleaners.

 During the 1930s the home was owned by and lived in by Mr Ernest Jolly, his wife Evelyn and two sons, Derek and Dennis. Jolly was a well-known for importing and racing thoroughbred horses. The Jolly’s were high-society members, and their functions were often reported in local newspapers.

 In 1994, The Adelaide Advertiser (April 24th, 1994) published a story about the house featuring a local businessman, Tony Syrianos, who had purchased the manor for $1.2 million dollars. After the purchase, the businessman out that the house is haunted by a young lady.

 The spirit of the young lady appears in an upstairs bedroom known as the Blue Room. It has been stated that she only appears during the hours of 11pm and 5am. She is said to walk from the Blue Room, to a bathroom, sometimes with the variation of walking up or down the extravagant staircase. She is dressed in a white nightgown with an overly frilly neckline.

The haunting of the Robe Terrace Manor (called Mendleshamon the show) appeared on 1990s television show “The Extraordinary” (episode 38). In the show, Mr Syrianos claims he is terrified of the ghost, and won’t enter the house at night. O the show they describe the spirit as being aged between fifteen and twenty years of age, with shoulder-length hair.
 Another witness reported a foul smell emanating from the Blue Room, doors slamming, windows opening and closing, and cold spots in the room. All these events occurred when the room was redecorated.

 Another witness, returning from a party reported all the paintings flying off the walls, and lights turning on by themselves.

 It is thought the spirit is that of a young girl who died in the house from the effects of tuberculosis around the 1920s, when the disease was making itself felt in North Adelaide.

 

 

 

Allen Tiller ALIAtech, DipFamHist is Australia’s most recognised paranormal investigator,
eminent paranormal historian, and star of the international smash hit television show “Haunting: Australia”.
Allen is also the founder of Eidolon Paranormal, South Australian Paranormal and the author
of book and blog, “The Haunts of Adelaide: History, Mystery and the Paranormal”.
Allen was awarded the 2017 “Emerging South Australian Historian of The Year Award” as presented by The History Council of South Australia. Employed as “Historian in Residence”
in 2016/2017 with the Adelaide City Council Libraries and employed by the City of Port
Adelaide Enfield Council to write the popular, “Ghosts of the Port Self-Guided Walking Tour”

You can find Allen online at:

http://www.twitter.com/Allen_Tiller
http://www.facebook.com/AllenHauntingAustralia
https://www.facebook.com/

This story was unpublished but written for MEGAScene Issue 20 2020

© Allen Tiller

Infanticide at North Adelaide

Infanticide at North Adelaide

North Adelaide 1910- SLSA: [B 3466]

History is not always kind, nor nice…

 The Town Clerks Avenue isn’t well-known terminology for many Adelaidean’s, even many that probably walk the avenue daily. It’s a walkway through the parklands leading from Sir Edwin Smith Avenue at Angas Gardens, along the Torrens River to Frome Road. It was established in 1917.

 On December 20, 1885, Adelaide Corporation Ganger (labourer) John Collins was walking along the Town Clerks Avenue just after 7am, heading into work from his home in North Adelaide.  As he was wandering along the path, he noticed a package lying in a drain. He retrieved the package and look inside to find the corpse of a baby boy, wrapped in newspaper and a large sheet of brown paper.
 The blood on the paper was fresh and still damp.

 Collins rushed to the North Adelaide police station and reported the find to the local constable Bea. Police-constable Bea attended the location and found three men standing around the package discussing its contents. Bea retrieved the package and returned with it to the police station.

 That evening Doctor Melville Jay attended the police station and conducted a post-mortem examination on the child’s body. He found that the child weighed just over six pounds, was 12 inches long, and from the appearance of the babies’ head, had been through a long labour. The child’s head had been almost severed from its body. There were large incisions across the neck that cut through to the spine.

 Most horrific, Doctor Jay discovered the organs of the baby and discovered that it had been born alive, the right lung was full of air, but he concluded that its life must have been cut short very quickly as the left lung had failed to be inflated.
  Also submitted to the post-mortem were a knife and men’s jacket that had been discovered in a yard on Poole Street in North Adelaide.
  During an inquest held at the Destitute Asylum on Kermode Street, witnesses came forward with descriptions of the mother of the child. The first was Ada Chickwidden.
  On 19 December, prior to the finding of the babies’ body on the Town Clerks Avenue. Ada Chickwidden saw, at 4 o’clock in the afternoon, a young woman of around 2 to 30 years of age, enter Hosking’s Shop in North Adelaide. The woman seemed unwell.
 She noted that she wore a black dress with a square plaid in front. The woman had entered the shop to inquire about the time.
 Prior to her entering the shop, Chickwidden had noticed the woman looking over the fence into the backyard. The woman left, and Chickwidden went back to her duties, leaving a bag with some paper in it, and a coat at the rear door outside the shop to be disposed of.
 On December 20, Chickwidden saw blood on the bricks at the rear of the shop, near the bag and coat she was taken outside the day prior.
 The night before, when laying in bed, she had heard someone telling a dog to quiet down but hadn’t paid much attention.
 During the inquest, Chickwidden identified the papers the child had been wrapped in as being the same ones she had put outside in a bag, she had meant to dispose of at a later date.
Chickwidden also stated she had seen the woman lying in the sand on New Years Day at Largs Bay, she went to speak to her, but the women would not look at her, so she left her there.

 The next witness in the inquest was Catherine Hollak of Finnis Street. Hollak stated she had heard noises coming from an empty “china man’s hut” next door to her own house. She went to inspect what was going on and found a young woman there. Hollak identified the young woman as one her and her husband had allowed to stay in their house a month prior. Hollak said to her; “This is a rather peculiar place for you to come.”; but the woman didn’t reply.
 Hollak asked her if she had a home, the woman replied; “No, I wish my throat was cut or that I was in the Torrens.”
 Hollak then offered the woman to come to stay at her house again and told the woman she would be back shortly, as she was first going to ask her husband if it was ok. Hollak left and when she returned the woman was gone.
 Hollak looked for, and chased her down in a street nearby, she asked the woman why she had left, but received an indistinct reply. The woman walked off and left Hollak standing there confused.
 Hollak described the woman as wearing a black dress and a black hat with a feather in it. She had seen the woman about the place for many years but had never known her name. Hollak knew the woman worked as a servant somewhere near Park Street but knew no more about her.
 A few days later the inquest reached its conclusion of: “wilful murder against some person or persons unknown.” It is not known whether the baby received a proper burial, or if the woman ever came forward
Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2019

Bibliography

‘INFANTICIDE AT NORTH ADELAIDE.’, South Australian Register, (15 January 1885), p. 7.
‘THE NORTH ADELAIDE INFANTICIDE.’, Evening Journal, (6 January 1885), p. 2.

A Black Mass at North Adelaide.

A Black Mass at North Adelaide.

The Haunts of Adelaide  This remarkable eyewitness account was published in the Evening Journal newspaper in 1904.
  A person identifying themselves as only “B.S.S.” witnessed an apparition of a funeral near the corner of Barnard Street some years prior and recounted it for the newspaper.
 The witness had walked down Molesworth Street, along Hill Street, and when at the corner of Barnard Street, near the hospital, witnessed an intensely black shape moving in the street. On this night, a very well-known lady in the area, lay dying in the Calvary Hospital just metres away from where the witness was standing.
 The witness watched on as the black shape paused in the road, then marched onto vacant land nearby. Walking closer to get a better view, the witness realised it was a funeral procession occurring in the night in front of them. A coffin, covered in black velvet was being held by four men, while two walked in front, and four behind. All the men wore ‘hose and doublet’, small cloaks or capes, swords at their sides and feather in their caps.
 The funeral procession stopped. They turned back to towards the hospital, and slowly vanished as they returned toward it, and where the dying woman lay.

 The women would not die, and in her final hours, called desperately for her individual ancestors. Was it them, dressed in black, bearing swords and the holding the coffin, or was it death coming to collect his dues?

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2019

Bibliography

1904 ‘GHOSTS, OR WHAT:’, Evening Journal, 18 October, p. 1. , viewed 22 Apr 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article200827889

The Adelaide Ghosts & Ghouls Walking Tour

The Adelaide Ghosts & Ghouls Walking Tour

The Adelaide Ghosts and Ghouls Walking Tour explores the stories behind Adelaide’s alleged hauntings and crimes, while shedding light on some our city’s more chilling history. The tour is a collaboration between paranormal investigator Allen Tiller, sound recordist Anthony Frith, and Adelaide City Libraries. It was designed and developed based on research from Allen’s history residency at the libraries in 2016, along with a range of ghost stories brought forward via public consultation sessions.
You can download the tour here, and guide yourself any time of the day or night!
Follow on facebook:
Tour locations

A surprise stop on the tour launch night, when Allen Tiller threw in an extra talk about the ghost that allegedly haunts the former channel 9 studios on Tynte Street

The Adelaide Arcade

St Peter and Paul’s Cathedral North Adelaide

The Adelaide Ghosts & Ghouls Walking Tour

The Adelaide Ghosts & Ghouls Walking Tour

The Adelaide Ghosts and Ghouls Walking Tour explores the stories behind Adelaide’s alleged hauntings and crimes, while shedding light on some our city’s more chilling history. The tour is a collaboration between paranormal investigator Allen Tiller, sound recordist Anthony Frith, and Adelaide City Libraries. It was designed and developed based on research from Allen’s history residency at the libraries in 2016, along with a range of ghost stories brought forward via public consultation sessions.
You can download the tour here, and guide yourself any time of the day or night!
Follow on facebook:
Tour locations

A surprise stop on the tour launch night, when Allen Tiller threw in an extra talk about the ghost that allegedly haunts the former channel 9 studios on Tynte Street

The Adelaide Arcade

St Peter and Paul’s Cathedral North Adelaide

Cathedral Hotel: Wrong Side of the Law

Cathedral Hotel: Wrong Side of the Law

The Cathedral Hotel North Adelaide
Photo: © 2017 – Allen Tiller


 After two robberies in North Adelaide, and a number of other smaller thefts, suspicions were being raised within the North Adelaide Police station of whom the offenders might be.
During the investigation of the Cathedral Hotel robbery, which netted the criminals a substantial amount of liquor and money, a time line of events was established.
 The local tram night watchman was called in as a witness, and told the police on the night in questions, he had seen Constable Edwards, at about 2am, walking his beat, and test the barroom doors to see if they were locked. He also stated, after Edwards had long passed, he noticed lights on in the billiard room.
Constable Edwards confirmed that he had tried the doors during his nightly walk at about, what he though was 1:30 to 1:45 am, and the doors were locked, with no-one else around.
 The detectives investigating the recent crimes, now had a suspect, based on rumours they had heard, but more significantly, on the approximate time. The Detectives, Martin, Nation, Dedman and Goldsworthy drove out to Prospect to the house of Constable George Wyatt.
George Wyatt, a police officer of seven years, married with three children, answered the door, and allowed the detectives in. He then allowed them to search his property, where they found a few bottles of alcohol, one of which had been hand written on by Mr Opie. Also in Wyatts possession were a number of tools, barbed wire and other goods, that Wyatt could not reasonably recount where he purchased them from.
 Wyatt was arrested and taken to his own precinct, The North Adelaide Police station for questioning. Wyatt refused to give up his accomplice, stating “I am mongrel enough for what I have done, but I can’t settle one of my own mates.”
 The Police began to look at who Wyatts mates were, and settled upon searching the house of friend, and fellow officer of 7 years, Constable John Farrar.
Farrar was found with a sum of money, and some of the missing bottle of alcohol. He was questioned and told his fellow officers Wyatt had given him the money and goods. When asked if he knew where they came from, he stated he did, but only after the fact.
The two police officers were formally charged, Wyatt with burglary and larceny, break and enter, and Farrar with receiving stolen goods.

Wyatt was sentenced to four years hard labour at and Farrar with three years of hard labour, both at Yatala prison, amongst some of the prisoners, they had probably arrested!

Both men’s descriptions were printed in the South Australia Police Gazette.

John Farrar:

John Farrar, tried at Supreme Court, Adelaide, on November 4th, 1918, for receiving stolen property; sentenced to three years with hard labour ; and at Adelaide, on November 11th, 1918, for unlawful possession; sentenced to 12 months with hard labour; native of England, labourer, born 1882, 5ft 11.5 inch high, dark complexion, dark hair, dark-brown eyes (lowering eyebrows) medium nose (risen on point) medium mouth, broad chin, scar on left elbow and outside forearm, very hairy on cheat and back, remains of tattoo on left wrist, black spot on centre of back, Freedom due July 14th, 1920.[1]

George Wyatt:
George Henry Wyatt, tried at Supreme Court, Adelaide on Nov 4th, 1918 for burglary and larceny, sentenced to four years hard labour, native of England, cooper, born 1887, 5ft 11in height.
 Fair complexion, ginger colour hair, blue eyes, large nose, medium mouth, large chin, small ears (projecting), boil mark on back of neck, two small scars on right knee and one on shin, small scar on left knee. Discharged in February 1921.
[2]
Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2018
Bibliography
The Advertiser, Thursday 17 October 1918, p7
1918 ‘In the Courts. CRIMINAL.’, Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 – 1931), 16 November, p. 13. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164166616

1918 ‘Burglary at North Adelaide.’, Yorke’s Peninsula Advertiser (SA : 1878 – 1922), 11 October, p. 3. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article216349077

1918 ‘Sensational Arrests.’, Port Pirie Recorder (SA : 1918 – 1919), 11 October, p. 2. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article95422823

1918 ‘Latest Telegrams’, The South Eastern Times (Millicent, SA : 1906 – 1954), 11 October, p. 3. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article200047162

1918 ‘BURGLARS AT NORTH ADELAIDE.’, The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 – 1954), 5 October, p. 2. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63753531

1918 ‘Late Telegrams.’, Eyre’s Peninsula Tribune (Cowell, SA : 1910 – 1950), 11 October, p. 2. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219277618

1918 ‘COMMITTED FOR TRIAL.’, Port Pirie Recorder (SA : 1918 – 1919), 19 October, p. 3. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article95423254


[1]:[1]  South Australia Police Gazette Indexes, 1862-1947. Ridgehaven, South Australia: Gould Genealogy and History, 2009.

Cathedral Hotel: Wrong Side of the Law

Cathedral Hotel: Wrong Side of the Law

The Cathedral Hotel North Adelaide
Photo: © 2017 – Allen Tiller


 After two robberies in North Adelaide, and a number of other smaller thefts, suspicions were being raised within the North Adelaide Police station of the identity of the offenders.
During the investigation of the Cathedral Hotel robbery, which netted the criminals a substantial amount of liquor and money, a timeline of events was established.
 The local tram night watchman was called in as a witness and told the police on the night in question, he had seen Constable Edwards, at about 2am, walking his beat, and test the bar-room doors to see if they were locked. He also stated, after Edwards had long passed, he noticed lights on in the billiard room.
Constable Edwards confirmed that he had tried the doors during his nightly walk at about 1:30 to 1:45 am. The doors were locked, with no-one else around.
 The detectives investigating the recent crimes now had a suspect, based on rumours they had heard, but more significantly, on the approximate time. The Detectives, Martin, Nation, Dedman and Goldsworthy drove out to Prospect to the house of Constable George Wyatt.

George Wyatt, a police officer of seven years, married with three children, answered the door and allowed the detectives in. He then allowed them to search his property, where they found a few bottles of alcohol, one of which had been handwritten on by Mr Opie. Also in Wyatt’s possession were a number of tools, barbed wire and other goods, that Wyatt could not reasonably recount where he purchased them from.
 Wyatt was arrested and taken to his own precinct, The North Adelaide Police station for questioning. Wyatt refused to give up his accomplice, stating “I am mongrel enough for what I have done, but I can’t settle one of my own mates.”
 The Police began to look at who Wyatt’s mates were, and settled upon searching the house of a friend, and fellow officer of 7 years, Constable John Farrar.
Farrar was found with a sum of money, and some of the missing bottles of alcohol. He was questioned and told his fellow officers Wyatt had given him the money and goods. When asked if he knew where they came from, he stated he did, but only after the fact.
The two police officers were formally charged, Wyatt with burglary and larceny, break and enter, and Farrar with receiving stolen goods.

Wyatt was sentenced to four years hard labour and Farrar with three years of hard labour, both at Yatala prison, amongst some of the prisoners they had probably arrested!

Both men’s descriptions were printed in the South Australia Police Gazette.

John Farrar:

John Farrar, tried at Supreme Court, Adelaide, on November 4th, 1918, for receiving stolen property; sentenced to three years with hard labour ; and at Adelaide, on November 11th, 1918, for unlawful possession; sentenced to 12 months with hard labour; native of England, labourer, born 1882, 5ft 11.5 inch high, dark complexion, dark hair, dark-brown eyes (lowering eyebrows) medium nose (risen on point) medium mouth, broad chin, scar on left elbow and outside forearm, very hairy on cheat and back, remains of tattoo on left wrist, black spot on centre of back, Freedom due July 14th, 1920.[1]

George Wyatt:
George Henry Wyatt, tried at Supreme Court, Adelaide on Nov 4th, 1918 for burglary and larceny, sentenced to four years hard labour, a native of England, cooper, born 1887, 5ft 11in height.
 Fair complexion, ginger colour hair, blue eyes, large nose, medium mouth, large chin, small ears (projecting), boil mark on the back of the neck, two small scars on right knee and one on the shin, small scar on left knee. Discharged in February 1921.
[2]
Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2018
Bibliography
The Advertiser, Thursday 17 October 1918, p7
1918 ‘In the Courts. CRIMINAL.’, Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 – 1931), 16 November, p. 13. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164166616

1918 ‘Burglary at North Adelaide.’, Yorke’s Peninsula Advertiser (SA : 1878 – 1922), 11 October, p. 3. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article216349077

1918 ‘Sensational Arrests.’, Port Pirie Recorder (SA : 1918 – 1919), 11 October, p. 2. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article95422823

1918 ‘Latest Telegrams’, The South Eastern Times (Millicent, SA : 1906 – 1954), 11 October, p. 3. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article200047162

1918 ‘BURGLARS AT NORTH ADELAIDE.’, The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 – 1954), 5 October, p. 2. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63753531

1918 ‘Late Telegrams.’, Eyre’s Peninsula Tribune (Cowell, SA : 1910 – 1950), 11 October, p. 2. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219277618

1918 ‘COMMITTED FOR TRIAL.’, Port Pirie Recorder (SA : 1918 – 1919), 19 October, p. 3. , viewed 29 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article95423254


[1]:[1]  South Australia Police Gazette Indexes, 1862-1947. Ridgehaven, South Australia: Gould Genealogy and History, 2009.

Cathedral Hotel: Robbery

Cathedral Hotel: Robbery

The Cathedral Hotel at North Adelaide
Photo: © 2017 Karen Tiller
Originally known as the Scotch Thistle Hotel in 1850, the hotel was established on the north side of Kermode Street and John Street (now King William Road), and in 1881, was moved to its present location. In 1925, the hotels name was changed to The Cathedral Hotel, and it has continued trading under this name for almost 100 years!
In 1918, several robberies had been occurred in and around North Adelaide. The police had no suspects, until a robbery occurred at the Scotch Thistle Hotel on October 4th.
 Mr Opie, husband of the hotels licensee, was on shift, and had closed the hotel. He followed his regular routine, locking all the doors and windows, except the one leading to the billiard room. He put the till into the store room, just off the dining room, turned out the lights, and locked the exit door on his way out at 2am.
 The following morning, Dorothy Walloschick, Mrs Ethel Opie’s sister, opened the hotel. At 6:30am, she found the storeroom door unlocked and all the contents of the room strewn about the place and the kitchen and billiard room doors had been left open by the offender.
 The burglar had smashed a window in the billiard room to gain entry, which he must’ve been very quiet in doing, as the Opie’s, asleep upstairs, did not wake to the sound.
Only a couple of months previously, a store on O’Connell street owned by Mr LeCornu had several items stolen. It was reported that the front door had been left unlocked, and the investigating Constable, Mr George Wyatt, had returned the key to Mr LeCornu, and then filed a report for the missing goods.
 The goods included garden hoses, barbered wire, tools, implements and paint.
Missing from the Hotel were 10 bottles of Chateau Tanunda brandy, seven-pint bottles of Heather Bell whisky, three bottles of Walker’s whisky, three bottles of Dewar’s whiskey, two bottles of Burke’s Irish whisky, eight-quart bottles of Henke’s schnapps, eight bottles of Reynella family port, and twelve half flasks of-Heather Bell whisky, also missing, £22 in money.
Continued next week!
Researched and written by  Allen Tiller ©2018

Bibliography published in next edition.

Cathedral Hotel: Robbery

Cathedral Hotel: Robbery

The Cathedral Hotel at North Adelaide
Photo: © 2017 Karen Tiller
Originally known as the Scotch Thistle Hotel in 1850, the hotel was established on the north side of Kermode Street and John Street (now King William Road), and in 1881, was moved to its present location. In 1925, the hotels name was changed to The Cathedral Hotel, and it has continued trading under this name for almost 100 years!
In 1918, several robberies had been occurred in and around North Adelaide. The police had no suspects, until a robbery occurred at the Scotch Thistle Hotel on October 4th.
 Mr Opie, husband of the hotels licensee, was on shift, and had closed the hotel. He followed his regular routine, locking all the doors and windows, except the one leading to the billiard room. He put the till into the store room, just off the dining room, turned out the lights, and locked the exit door on his way out at 2am.
 The following morning, Dorothy Walloschick, Mrs Ethel Opie’s sister, opened the hotel. At 6:30am, she found the storeroom door unlocked and all the contents of the room strewn about the place and the kitchen and billiard room doors had been left open by the offender.
 The burglar had smashed a window in the billiard room to gain entry, which he must’ve been very quiet in doing, as the Opie’s, asleep upstairs, did not wake to the sound.
Only a couple of months previously, a store on O’Connell street owned by Mr LeCornu had several items stolen. It was reported that the front door had been left unlocked, and the investigating Constable, Mr George Wyatt, had returned the key to Mr LeCornu, and then filed a report for the missing goods.
 The goods included garden hoses, barbered wire, tools, implements and paint.
Missing from the Hotel were 10 bottles of Chateau Tanunda brandy, seven-pint bottles of Heather Bell whisky, three bottles of Walker’s whisky, three bottles of Dewar’s whiskey, two bottles of Burke’s Irish whisky, eight-quart bottles of Henke’s schnapps, eight bottles of Reynella family port, and twelve half flasks of-Heather Bell whisky, also missing, £22 in money.
Continued next week!
Researched and written by  Allen Tiller ©2018

Bibliography published in next edition.

The Forgotten Mayor


The Forgotten Mayor

 The only South Australian Mayor not to have his portrait displayed in the Adelaide Town Hall, Joseph Clay Hall was Mayor of Adelaide in 1854 to 1855. He married Jane Youd and the couple had one daughter, Elizabeth.
Mr. Hall emigrated to South Australia from England around 1941 and worked as a share broker from the end of Rundle Street at Waterhouse Chambers. He lived in North Adelaide on Pennington Terrace in a home overlooking the park lands.

 Not much is known about Mr. Hall, his name doesn’t appear in a lot of the early literature about the politics of South Australia.
 There is a short blurb about him in P. Hosking’s “The Official Civic Record of South Australia: Centenary year, 1936” in which Mr. Hosking states the following about Mr. Hall’s political aspirations:
“There are, unfortunately, very few particulars available regarding Mr. Joseph Hall, who was the third person to fill the Chief Magistracy. He was first returned to the City Council on 12th October, 1852, as Alderman for Robe Ward, and in 1854 was elected Mayor.
 He occupied the Chair for a year, and afterwards, continued in February, 1857, when his death occurred.
 It is known that at the time of his demise he conducted the business of a broker in an office situated in what is now known as Waterhouse Chambers at the corner of King William and Rundle Streets, and that his private residence was on Pennington Terrace, North Adelaide.
 He was buried at West Terrace Cemetery.
 Mr. Hall’s age appears in the cemetery records as 54 years, while on the tombstone it is given at 51 years.” 
Mr. Hall’s name can also be found on the 1845 “Petition Against South Australia Becoming A Penal Settlement” which was a protest against the South Australian Colony who wanted to bring transported convicts into the settlement to help with labour shortages. South Australia is the only colony in Australia not settled by convicts. 

 Mr. Hall was known for his outrageous and unpredictable behavior. One recorded incident of his unpredictable behavior involved Mr. Hall running through the northern parklands in only his night shirt.
 His wacky behavior would eventually lead to his death.
In 1857 Mr. Hall was going through marriage difficulties and had separated from his wife, leaving their Pennington Terrace home to stay with his friend, Mr. Staines on Kermode Street.
 On the hot summer night of February 10th1857, Mr. Hall had gathered a large crowd of onlookers to his antics. He was stationed on the balcony of his friends Kermode Street house.
 Dressed in his night shirt, trousers, boots and hat, he was running backwards and forwards along the balcony accusing the crowd below of conspiring to kill him.
 A man brought a ladder to the balcony and tried to bring Hall down, but to avail. Hal ran along the balcony and jumped off, landing on his feet, he began to frantically run around in circles all the while shouting for someone to take him home.
 He was eventually escorted by a Police Sergeant and a local Draper to the North Adelaide Police Station. After a few hours in the local cells, Hall became violently and uncontrollably ill.
 Doctors were called, but it was too late for Hall, who passed away in “a state of madness”..
 At the inquest, held at the nearby Scotch Thistle Hotel, George Thompson, one of the two men that had led Mr. Hall to the Police Station stated that he heard a cry of “police” at about 11pm on the evening of the ruckus.
 He saw a man take a ladder from the Police Station, and followed the man to Kermode Street where he saw Mr. Hall acting erratic on the balcony.
From Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904), Saturday 14 February 1857, page 5 regarding evidence given by George Thompson:
 “The man who had the ladder went up and tried to persuade the deceased to come off the verandah. He could not succeed, and came down. Witness went up the ladder and said “Mr. Hall, you know me?” He replied, “Oh yes, Simon Fairlie, I know you very well.” Endeavoured to persuade him to come down, but he would not do so. He then grasped witness by the hand very firmly, and witness caught hold of his leg. Was anxious to keep him if possible till someone assisted in taking him. He said “You won’t let anyone kill me, will you?” Told him he would not, and tried to persuade him to come down. He said there was
a man below who wanted to kill him, and if witness would make them all go away he would come down. Called for those below to go away, and almost at the same moment deceased pushed witness so sharply as nearly to throw him from the ladder. Saved himself by catching at the verandah. Witness ran along the verandah and jumped off. That must have been soon after 11 o’clock. Had known the deceased very well. He appeared more mad than intoxicated—really mad. Had not been aware of his habits—always thought him a particularly quiet sober man.
 The two Doctors that attended Mr. Hall in the weeks before his death, and his regular doctor gave evidence that Mr. Hall suffered from, and died from the effects of Delirium Tremens.
 Mr. Hall consumed large amounts of alcohol on a regular basis, which would account for his often erratic behavior, and could possibly be the cause for his split from his wife and daughter.
 He consumed monumental amounts of alcohol in the seven weeks he had been separated from his family, and after the drinking ended, his body and mind began the alcohol withdrawal symptoms that equate to Delirium Tremens, and led to his insanity and death.

© 2016, Written and Researched by Allen Tiller – www.AllenTiller.com.au
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