Tag Archives: mystery

Allen Tiller at the Gawler Library 27 May 2021

 

Allen Tiller at the Gawler Library

Thursday 27th May
6:30 pm

Join Allen Tiller, one of Australia’s leading paranormal historian’s, as he introduces you to The Haunts of Adelaide.

About this Event

This second edition of The Haunts of Adelaide has been completely rewritten with extra historical facts, footnoting, an index, more photos, and most importantly, more ghost stories!

Allen will be discussing some of Adelaide’s most haunted locations and the history behind the buildings, the people, the urban legends and the ghosts that haunt Adelaide and its suburbs.

Allen was the recipient of the History Council of South Australia’s Emerging Historian of the Year Award 2017, and has also featured on the paranormal reality television show Haunting: Australia. He is a respected historian, paranormal researcher, author, poet, and the founder of Eidolon Paranormal, S.A. Paranormal, and The Haunts of Adelaide.

Allen will have books available for sale on the night.

The Haunts of Adelaide: History, Mystery and the Paranormal: REVISED EDITION

The Haunts of Adelaide: History, Mystery and the Paranormal
REVISED EDITION

The Haunts of Adelaide: Revised Edition, (BOOK + KINDLE) is now live at Amazon.com.au​ in traditional book form!!!
The Haunts of Adelaide: History, Mystery and the Paranormal is researched and written by award-winning historian, Allen Tiller.
This second edition of The Haunts of Adelaide has been completely rewritten with extra historical facts, footnoting, an index, more photos, and most importantly, more ghost stories!
Join Allen Tiller, one of Australia’s leading paranormal historian’s, as he documents some of Adelaide’s most haunted locations and the history behind the buildings, the people, the urban legends and the ghosts that haunt Adelaide and its suburbs, in this completely revised and rewritten edition.
Inside you will discover the ghosts that dwelled at Graham’s Castle, Younghusband Mansion, The Adelaide Arcade, and Waterfall Gully. Find out the truth behind Schneider’s Alley and the read about the tiger of the Union Hotel!

Get spooked with 30 stories from the other side: The Haunts of Adelaide: History, Mystery, and the Paranormal: REVISED EDITION

The Haunts of Adelaide is 7 Years Old Today!

The Haunts of Adelaide is 7 Years Old Today!

Today, the 22nd of October 2019, marks 7 years since I began writing this blog. So to mark the occasion today, I am going to link back to the seven most popular blog posts
1. Muzyk Murder – Unfortunately the most read blog post on The Haunts of Adelaide is the story of the horrific murder of Tracy Muzyk in 1996. 
2. Para Para House – the second most popular blog post is a story of a mansion in Gawler West:
3. Woodhouse Activity Centre is the third most read blog post on The Haunts of Adelaide. While the story is brief in this post, a future post or possible book story will go into greater detail about the alleged ghosts
4. A former convalescent home for children at Grange is the 4th most popular Blog. Estcourt House was built in 1883 and used as a hospital, today it is a private home.
5. The Adelaide Central Markets make it into 5th spot with a ghost story about a security guard who claimed to witness strange goings-on in the Adelaide icon.
6. In the 6th spot, we have a hometown haunt: Dead Man’s Pass at Gawler. I grew up playing in this reserve as a child and know its stories, its nooks and crannies, and still to this day enjoy exploring this location.
7. The seventh most read blog post is “Sinister by Design: Part 2: Carclew House”. Since writing this post way back in 2012, I have visited Carclew many times and learned a great deal more about its history and alleged hauntings! look for new stories in future publications
A big thank you to each and every one of you that has taken the time to read, share or interact with this blog. I enjoy researching history, I enjoy telling stories, and I started writing this blog purely for my own interest, so its a blessing for me that so many people have come to read this blog.
Allen Tiller

Kate Cocks: Pt IV: The Crusade Against Psychic Exploitation.

Kate Cocks: Pt IV: The Crusade Against Psychic Exploitation.

 1917, the Great War was devouring people and resources, and South Australian women, scared for their sons, brothers and husbands fighting for the war effort, were doing anything to they could to try and find out how their loved ones were doing on the war front.
Women were turning to psychics in droves in the hope of diving some knowledge about their loved ones, and unfortunately a lot of “rogue” psychics began to spring up around the State, ready to look deep into their crystal ball and part distraught women from their money with fanciful tales divined for dollars.

 So bad was the trend, that one fortune teller told an anxious mother, worried about her son, that he would be hanged if she, the fortune-teller did not intervene. To stop it happening, the mother would have to pay money to the psychic to prevent the tragedy!

Disgusted by this turn of events, Kate Cocks and her Women’s Police Department went on a crusade to stop the onslaught of “Occult Houses” that had started opening around Adelaide. Cocks had the law behind her, as The Police Act of 1916, Section 67, clearly laid out the law against Fortune Tellers (you can learn more about the laws at a previous post here: http://hauntedadelaide.blogspot.com/2017/10/trading-in-sorrow-criminal-clairvoyants.html)

Cocks said of the trend:
“Current events largely determine the exploitation of simple-hearted people by callous adventurers.’ observed Miss Cocks. ‘As an example, I quote the flood of fortune-telling that swept over the country in war time. ‘It was a cruel thing, apart from its ridiculous aspect. Women opened ‘occult’ apartments. and undertook to read the future for varying amounts of payment, according to the financial position of their clients. These were mostly women of the nervy type who were living at high pressure on account of having loved ones at the war. ‘It was a frightful thing to exploit such anxiety, and we did not pause in our ruthless cleaning of those crystal-gazers until they were no more.” (The Advertiser, October 1936)

 Cocks crusade against psychics really took off in 1917, when she was involved a number of stings bringing down fake psychics around Adelaide. The 25th case in succession of cases against fraudulent psychics was a young Adelaide man who had put an advertisement in the local newspapers, asking for anyone wanting fortunes told, to send him penny stamps through the mail to a Sydney address.
 The scammer had set it up with the Adelaide post office so that any mail addressed to “Hubert, Box 440” in Sydney, leaving from Adelaide, be held for a few days and he would pick it up. He then sent a letter back asking for more money for more psychic insights.  What he wasn’t counting on was the ingenuity of Cocks, who caught the rogue psychic out. He ended up with 3 months gaol and 25 pound fine for his efforts and recorded as a “rogue or vagabond”.
A little over a decade later, in 1929, Cocks was still pursuing psychics under Section 67. At the Royal Adelaide Show, she had set up a sting, and had her fortune read by a number of palm readers, and crystal ball psychics.
5 psychics were arrested and charged under Section 67, being; Frances Alexander, George Mereno, Mary Stanley, Julia Stanley and Alick Alexander, all pleaded guilty, but in ignorance of the law. Each psychic was fined 10 Shillings for their crime and 10 shillings court costs. ($77 AUD total costs each in today’s money).

Today the Police Act 1916, Section 67 is no longer used, instead we have a newer law meant to stop fake psychics. The law is now known as The South Australian Police Act, Section 40 Part 8, and is enforceable (even though I am not aware of anyone who has been arrested under the act, even though I am aware of several fraudulent psychics!)


40—Acting as a spiritualist, medium etc with intent to defraud A person who, with intent to defraud, purports to act as a spiritualist or medium, or to exercise powers of telepathy or clairvoyance or other similar powers, is guilty of an offence.

Maximum penalty: $10 000 or imprisonment for 2 years.
Kate Cocks: Pt V(a): The Stolen Generation

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018
Bibliography on final post

Kate Cocks: Pt IV: The Crusade Against Psychic Exploitation.


Kate Cocks: Pt IV: The Crusade Against Psychic Exploitation.



 1917, the Great War was devouring people and resources. South Australian women were scared for their sons, brothers and husbands fighting for the war effort. Women were doing anything they could to try and find out how their loved ones were doing on the war front, and whether they were alive, wounded, or dead.
Women were turning to psychics in droves in the hope of divining some knowledge about their loved ones, and unfortunately a lot of “rogue” psychics began to spring up around the State, ready to look deep into their crystal balls, and part distraught women from their money, with fanciful tales divined for dollars.

 So bad was the trend, that one fortune-teller told an anxious mother, worried about her son, that he would be hung if she, the fortune-teller, did not intervene. To stop it happening, the mother would have to pay money to the psychic to prevent the tragedy!

Disgusted by this turn of events, Kate Cocks and her Women’s Police Department went on a crusade to stop the onslaught of “Occult Houses” that had started opening around Adelaide. Cocks had the law behind her, as The Police Act of 1916, Section 67, clearly laid out the law against Fortune Tellers (you can learn more about the laws at a previous post here: http://hauntedadelaide.blogspot.com/2017/10/trading-in-sorrow-criminal-clairvoyants.html)

Cocks said of the trend:
“Current events largely determine the exploitation of simple-hearted people by callous adventurers.’ observed Miss Cocks. ‘As an example, I quote the flood of fortune-telling that swept over the country in wartime. ‘It was a cruel thing, apart from its ridiculous aspect. Women opened ‘occult’ apartments. and undertook to read the future for varying amounts of payment, according to the financial position of their clients. These were mostly women of the nervy type who were living at high pressure on account of having loved ones at the war. ‘It was a frightful thing to exploit such anxiety, and we did not pause in our ruthless cleaning of those crystal-gazers until they were no more.” (The Advertiser, October 1936)

 Cocks crusade against psychics really took off in 1917, when she was involved in a number of stings bringing down fake psychics around Adelaide. The 25th case in the succession of cases against fraudulent psychics was a young Adelaide man who had put an advertisement in the local newspapers, asking for anyone wanting fortunes told, to send him penny stamps through the mail to a Sydney address.
 The scammer had set up his rouse at the Adelaide Post Office so that any mail addressed to “Hubert, Box 440” in Sydney, leaving from Adelaide, be held for a few days so he could pick it up.
 On receiving a letter, he replied asking for money for more psychic insights.  What he wasn’t counting on was the ingenuity of Cocks, who caught the rogue psychic out. He ended up with 3 months gaol, and 25 pound fine for his efforts and was recorded as a “rogue or vagabond” in his court records.

A little over a decade later, in 1929, Cocks was still pursuing psychics under Section 67. At the Royal Adelaide Show, she had set up a sting and had her fortune read by a number of palm readers, and crystal ball psychics.
5 psychics were arrested and charged under Section 67, being; Frances Alexander, George Mereno, Mary Stanley, Julia Stanley and Alick Alexander. All pleaded guilty but in ignorance of the law. Each psychic was fined 10 Shillings for their crime and 10 shillings court costs. ($77 AUD total costs each in today’s money).

Today the Police Act 1916, Section 67 is no longer used, instead, we have a newer law meant to stop fake psychics. The law is now known as The South Australian Police Act, Section 40 Part 8, and is enforceable (even though I am not aware of anyone who has been arrested under the act, even though I am aware of several fraudulent psychics!)


40—Acting as a spiritualist, medium etc with intent to defraud A person who, with intent to defraud, purports to act as a spiritualist or medium, or to exercise powers of telepathy or clairvoyance or other similar powers is guilty of an offence.

Maximum penalty: $10 000 or imprisonment for 2 years.

You can also report fake psychics to scam watch!
https://www.scamwatch.gov.au/types-of-scams/buying-or-selling/psychic-clairvoyant

NEXT WEEK: Kate Cocks: Pt V(a): The Stolen Generation

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2018

Bibliography on the final post

Witchcraft in South Australia Part IV Gottfried Hoffman

Witchcraft in South Australia

 Part IV

 Gottfried Hoffman

 In 1853, Lyndoch cattle and pig farmer, 28-year-old, Gottfried Hoffman was living the simple country life in the Barossa Valley. He had emigrated to Australia from Germany with his wife and family and settled in the predominately German Barossa Valley.
Devoutly Lutheran, Hoffman and family were very well known as they often attended church services at nearby Bethany.
 Thing had been going well for the Hoffman family until in late October some his cows and pigs had suddenly, and unexplainably become ill.
 On the 5thof November 8-year-old Mary Wressell, a neighbor of Hoffman’s, suddenly turned up on the families’ doorstep. She asked politely for some butter, of which Mrs Hoffman supplied. Before she left Gottfried asked young Mary, if she could please ask her mother to drop by the house.
 Young Mary returned home to mother (also named Mary) and gave her the butter and message from Mr Hoffman. Mary Ann (mother) finished her chores and went over to the Hoffman house as requested.
Mary Ann knocked on the Hoffman’s door and was greeted by Mrs Hoffman, who suddenly became hostile and accused May Ann of bewitching the families cows.
 Mary Ann, shocked by the allegation, began to deny any such doing when Gottfried suddenly emerged from the side of the house. He came toward Mary Anne, who held out her hand to shake Gottfried’s hand. Gottfried shook in return, then grabbed Mary Ann’s hand tightly, and slashed across her arm with a large knife.
 He rubbed her blood across his hands then stated “mein cows right now.”
Mary Ann cried out in shock and pain, and Gottfried stabbed her in the arm again, then as she twisted to get away he stabbed her twice in the back. He then grabbed a large stick and beat her, before hitting her in the head with a large rock. Mary Ann fell to the ground, but somehow managed to get up and make her way home.
As she stumbled along the path home, she looked back to see Gottfried standing at the front of the house with a shot gun.
Mary Ann made it home to her daughter, who raised the alarm with her father that something was wrong. Dr Notts from Gawler was called, and when he arrived, found Mary Ann hysterical. She had wound an inch and half long on her arm that went through to the bone, and two stab wounds on her back and shoulder. She was also badly beaten and covered in bruises.
Gottfried was soon arrested and charged with cutting, maiming and assaulting Mary Ann Wresell. During the court case Hoffman’s wife and brother’s testimony conflicted with that of Wresell, but the evidence was overwhelming, and the jury found him guilty. Hoffman was sentenced to 5 years hard labour.
Curiously, during the entire court case, Hoffman did not deny his belief that Mary Ann Wessell was a witch that had hexed his farm, and that washing his hands in her blood would cure the families problems!
Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2018
Bibliography

1854 ‘WITCHCRAFT IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA.’, Inquirer (Perth, WA : 1840 – 1855), 8 March, p. 2. (SUPPLEMENT TO “THE INQUIRER.”), viewed 09 Apr 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65741753

1853 ‘LAW AND POLICE COURTS. SUPREME COURT—CRIMINAT, SIDE.’, Adelaide Times (SA : 1848 – 1858), 3 December, p. 3. , viewed 09 Apr 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207121817

1854 ‘WITCHCRAFT IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA.’, Inquirer (Perth, WA : 1840 – 1855), 8 March, p. 2. (SUPPLEMENT TO “THE INQUIRER.”), viewed 09 Apr 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65741753

Witchcraft in South Australia: Part IV Gottfried Hoffman

Witchcraft in South Australia

 Part IV

 Gottfried Hoffman

 In 1853, Lyndoch cattle and pig farmer, 28-year-old, Gottfried Hoffman was living the simple country life in the Barossa Valley. He had emigrated to Australia from Germany with his wife and family and settled in the predominately German Barossa Valley.
Devoutly Lutheran, Hoffman and family were very well known as they often attended church services at nearby Bethany.
 Things had been going well for the Hoffman family until in late October some his cows and pigs had suddenly, and unexplainably become ill.
 On the 5th of November 8-year-old Mary Wressell, a neighbour of Hoffman’s suddenly turned up on the families’ doorstep. She asked politely for some butter, of which Mrs Hoffman supplied. Before she left Gottfried asked young Mary, if she could please ask her mother to drop by the house.
 Young Mary returned home to mother (also named Mary) and gave her the butter and message from Mr Hoffman. Mary Ann (mother) finished her chores and went over to the Hoffman house as requested.
Mary Ann knocked on the Hoffman’s door and was greeted by Mrs Hoffman, who suddenly became hostile and accused May Ann of bewitching the families cows.
 Mary Ann, shocked by the allegation, began to deny any such doing when Gottfried suddenly emerged from the side of the house. He came toward Mary Anne, who held out her hand to shake Gottfried’s hand. Gottfried shook in return, then grabbed Mary Ann’s hand tightly, and slashed across her arm with a large knife.
 He rubbed her blood across his hands then stated: “mein cows right now.”
Mary Ann cried out in shock and pain, and Gottfried stabbed her in the arm again, then as she twisted to get away he stabbed her twice in the back. He then grabbed a large stick and beat her, before hitting her in the head with a large rock. Mary Ann fell to the ground but somehow managed to get up and make her way home.
As she stumbled along the path home, she looked back to see Gottfried standing at the front of the house with a shotgun.
Mary Ann made it home to her daughter, who raised the alarm with her father that something was wrong. Dr Notts from Gawler was called, and when he arrived, found Mary Ann hysterical. She had wound an inch and half long on her arm that went through to the bone, and two stab wounds on her back and shoulder. She was also badly beaten and covered in bruises.

Gottfried was soon arrested and charged with cutting, maiming and assaulting Mary Ann Wresell. During the court case, Hoffman’s wife and brother’s testimony conflicted with that of Wresell, but the evidence was overwhelming, and the jury found him guilty. Hoffman was sentenced to 5 years hard labour.

Curiously, during the entire court case, Hoffman did not deny his belief that Mary Ann Wessell was a witch that had hexed his farm, and that washing his hands in her blood would cure the families problems!

Researched and written by Allen Tiller ©2018
Bibliography


1854 ‘WITCHCRAFT IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA.’, Inquirer (Perth, WA: 1840 – 1855), 8 March, p. 2. (SUPPLEMENT TO “THE INQUIRER.”), viewed 09 Apr 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65741753
1853 ‘LAW AND POLICE COURTS. SUPREME COURT—CRIMINAT, SIDE.’, Adelaide Times (SA: 1848 – 1858), 3 December, p. 3. , viewed 09 Apr 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207121817
1854 ‘WITCHCRAFT IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA.’, Inquirer (Perth, WA: 1840 – 1855), 8 March, p. 2. (SUPPLEMENT TO “THE INQUIRER.”), viewed 09 Apr 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65741753

COCKBURN: A Murder of Crowe

COCKBURN: A Murder of Crowe

Cockburn is a small town in South Australia’s mid north, on the boarder of New South Wales. Cockburn is 50km’s west of Broken Hill and 462 Km’s north-east of Adelaide.
The little community began in 1886 after the South Australian Government struck a deal with the New South Wales government to exploit ore deposits in nearby Silverton, Thackaringa and Umberumberka.
The NSW Government turned the deal down, and local business identities instead, built their own line from Silverton to the SA border.
By 1892, 2000 people were calling Cockburn home, and the town boasted two hotels, a butcher, two general stores, schools and churches.
In 1929, Daniel Crowe, his wife Clara and six children moved to the small community. Daniel worked a shunter for the South Australian Railways Department, and lived in provided railway cottages in the town.
 Earlier in the year, Daniel and Clara lost their eldest son, Daniel Jnr. in accident at Peterborough.
Things had not been good between the couple since the death of their eldest son, and over time Daniel became suspicious that his wife was cheating on him with a man named Kennedy.

One-day Daniel wasn’t feeling good, and decided to go to the doctor at Broken Hill. He asked Clara to go with him and she replied; “Not on your life. I have too see a friend tonight.”
 Daniel replied; “I am nothing?”
To which Clara replied; “Yes. You are alright, but I think that I have met better!”

Daniel left to see his doctor in Broken Hill. On his way back into Cockburn he noticed Kennedy acting suspiciously, ducking and weaving through train carriages, as if trying to avoid him.
Daniel burst into his home and asked Clara; “What is the strong of this?”
 Clara screamed back; “Go to Blazes! Why did you not stay in Broken Hill, you’re not wanted here” and stormed off into the bedroom.
 The following morning, Clara, the 15-year-old daughter of Daniel and Clara Snr. awoke at 7am, she lit the fire in the kitchen readying it to make breakfast. Younger sister Kathleen, went into her mother’s room to rouse her. Suddenly a scream ripped through the house, and Kathleen came back in the room, and fighting through tears, said to her brothers and sisters “Mummy is dead!”
The night before, Daniel had stormed out from the house, and made his way to the rail siding, where he knew a bottle of Lysol was stored. He then made his way back to the family home, loaded his rifle, and snuck into the bedroom.
 He squatted at the foot of the bed, and shot his wife one time in the face, somehow not waking the entire household.
At 3:30 in the morning, he was seen by eldest daughter Clara, who had been disturbed by the sounds of something falling over, entering the kitchen and getting a bottle of beer, then muttering to himself “Now that’s done”, before exiting the back door of the house.
 Eldest Daughter Clara ushered her siblings off to a neighbour’s house and alerted police. They arrived and found Clara Snr. dead in her bed, 50 yards out from the rear of the house, they found the unconscious body of Daniel laying on the ground.
Daniel was taken away and placed in Parkside Mental Hospital in Adelaide, under suspicion of murder and of attempted suicide by poison.
He was questioned by police, but denied remembering anything to do with the incident.
Daniel Crowe faced magistrates at Gladstone Gaol, with his attorney’s issuing a statement of insanity as his defence.
The Jury hearing the case could not decide one way or the other over the charge of murder, so Daniel Crowe was left indefinitely in the Parkside Asylum. He died in 1962.
Cockburn is now a town of about 25 people, with one pub….
© 2018 Allen Tiller
Bibliography
1929 ‘COCKBURN TRAGEDY’, News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 – 1954), 27 September, p. 11. (HOME EDITION), viewed 06 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129072651

1929 ‘COCKBURN TRAGEDY’, Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 – 1954), 12 September, p. 2. , viewed 07 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46579207

1930 ‘COCKBURN TRAGEDY’, The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 – 1931), 13 February, p. 11. , viewed 07 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73795383

Cockburn Progress Association, 2018, Cockburn SA – Town History, Cockburn Progress Association, viewed 7 Jan 2018, http://www.cockburn.org.au/town-history.html

1930 ‘TRIAL OF D. B. CROWE’, Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 – 1954), 21 March, p. 2. , viewed 07 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46571779

COCKBURN: A Murder of Crowe

COCKBURN: A Murder of Crowe

Cockburn is a small town in South Australia’s outback, on the border of New South Wales. Cockburn is 50km’s west of Broken Hill and 462 Km’s north-east of Adelaide.
The little community began in 1886 after the South Australian Government struck a deal with the New South Wales government to exploit ore deposits in nearby Silverton, Thackaringa and Umberumberka.
The NSW Government turned the deal down, and local business identities instead, built their own line from Silverton to the SA border.
By 1892, 2000 people were calling Cockburn home, and the town boasted two hotels, a butcher, two general stores, schools and churches.
In 1929, Daniel Crowe, his wife Clara and six children moved to the small community. Daniel worked a shunter for the South Australian Railways Department and lived in provided railway cottages in the town.
 Earlier in the year, Daniel and Clara lost their eldest son, Daniel Jnr. in an accident at Peterborough.
Things had not been good between the couple since the death of their eldest son, and over time Daniel became suspicious that his wife was cheating on him with a man named Kennedy.

One-day Daniel wasn’t feeling good and decided to go to the doctor at Broken Hill. He asked Clara to go with him and she replied; “Not on your life. I have to see a friend tonight.”
 Daniel replied; “I am nothing?”
To which Clara replied; “Yes. You are alright, but I think that I have met better!”

Daniel left to see his doctor in Broken Hill. On his way back into Cockburn he noticed Kennedy acting suspiciously, ducking and weaving through train carriages as if trying to avoid him.
Daniel burst into his home and asked Clara; “What is the strong of this?”
 Clara screamed back; “Go to Blazes! Why did you not stay in Broken Hill, you’re not wanted here!” and stormed off into the bedroom.
 The following morning, Clara, the 15-year-old daughter of Daniel and Clara Snr. awoke at 7am, she lit the fire in the kitchen readying it to make breakfast. Younger sister Kathleen, went into her mother’s room to rouse her. Suddenly a scream ripped through the house, and Kathleen came back in the room, and fighting through tears, said to her brothers and sisters “Mummy is dead!”
The night before, Daniel had stormed out from the house and made his way to the rail siding, where he knew a bottle of Lysol was stored. He then made his way back to the family home, loaded his rifle, and snuck into the bedroom.
 He squatted at the foot of the bed, and shot his wife one time in the face, somehow not waking the entire household.
At 3:30 in the morning, he was seen by eldest daughter Clara, who had been disturbed by the sounds of something falling over, entering the kitchen and getting a bottle of beer, then muttering to himself “Now that’s done”, before exiting the back door of the house.
 Eldest Daughter Clara ushered her siblings off to a neighbour’s house and alerted police. They arrived and found Clara Snr. dead in her bed, 50 yards out from the rear of the house, they found the unconscious body of Daniel laying on the ground.
Daniel was taken away and placed in Parkside Mental Hospital in Adelaide, under suspicion of murder and of attempted suicide by poison.
He was questioned by police but denied remembering anything to do with the incident.
Daniel Crowe faced magistrates at Gladstone Gaol, with his attorney’s issuing a statement of insanity as his defence.
The Jury hearing the case could not decide one way or the other over the charge of murder, so Daniel Crowe was left indefinitely in the Parkside Asylum. He died in 1962.
Cockburn is now a town of about 25 people, with one pub….
© 2018 Allen Tiller
Bibliography
1929 ‘COCKBURN TRAGEDY’, News (Adelaide, SA: 1923 – 1954), 27 September, p. 11. (HOME EDITION), viewed 06 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129072651

1929 ‘COCKBURN TRAGEDY’, Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW: 1888 – 1954), 12 September, p. 2. , viewed 07 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46579207

1930 ‘COCKBURN TRAGEDY’, The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA: 1889 – 1931), 13 February, p. 11. , viewed 07 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73795383

Cockburn Progress Association, 2018, Cockburn SA – Town History, Cockburn Progress Association, viewed 7 Jan 2018, http://www.cockburn.org.au/town-history.html

1930 ‘TRIAL OF D. B. CROWE’, Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW: 1888 – 1954), 21 March, p. 2. , viewed 07 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46571779

A Haunted Doll: Emiri


Emiri came from the United States in 2010. I bought her from ebay, with little hope she was actually haunted, but with the thought of, if she might be, it would be interesting to experiment with her, and see if I could gather any data via experimentation.
The following letter came attached with Emiri:
“This doll belonged to my Mother, she used to take her everywhere. Emiri loves car rides, she has always been talkative, she also likes to draw with coloured pencils, especially red ones.
 She rode a lot when she was alive and still loves it, along with travel games.
She says she choked on some fast food and died, it seems like it was French fries.
 She is easily annoyed, and doesn’t like to be handled and cuddled a lot.
She likes to quietly play.
We have seen her move and our belt buckles in the car buckle on their own.
 When inside her host changes positions, or ends up flipped over.
She prefers to be away from other dolls.”
I ran countless experiments with different gadgets, but to no avail, nothing ever came from anything I tried. I did, on occasion ask psychics, who knew nothing about the dolls past, to hold her, and only one, a sensitive person, who claimed no special abilities, was able to deliver something very similar to the back story provided by the original owners.
 At the time that intrigued me, but In retrospect, it was much more likely to be coincidence, or they had seen the same doll for sale online!
Emiri travelled to a lot of locations that I investigated, including St Johns Cemetery near Kapunda, but her real claim to fame was on TV show Haunting: Australia, where she had a minor role in the Gledswood Homestead episode.
 I used Emiri on the show to see if myself and Ian Lawman could interact with the spirit of a small girl, that psychic Rayleen Kable had felt died in a small room just a little bit away from the main homestead, thought to be quarters set aside for convict workers.
 Whilst we were in the room, Ian and I noted temperature drops, and high EMF readings (the readings were cut from the episode), but no other equipment registered anything abnormal. Later it would be revealed that when Rayleen was investigating the room, she picked up on a young girl named Isabel.
 Isabel would reveal herself through an EVP, in which she clearly replies with the answer of “yes” to one of Rayleen’s questions.

I don’t believe Emiri to be haunted, but I am also not a psychic, and maybe she won’t reveal herself to me, but as many of you know, there are no strict answers in the spiritual realm, so could Emiri and Isabel have met on the spiritual plane, and interacted, thus giving the sensations of cold spots, breathing sounds and EMF readings, or was it just our imaginations being hyped out about investigating an allegedly haunted location, and with the tiredness that creeps in after running such a tight shooting/ investigation schedule (Gledswood was the third location we filmed after Woodford Academy and Australiana Pioneer Village).
Head on over to my facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/AllenHauntingAustralia/ to watch a short video from the episode.
So what do you believe?
 Can a doll be a container for a spirit to dwell? 
Can an object be haunted?
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Thanks for reading!
Allen