Tag Archives: haunts

The Ghost Dogs of Moculta

The Ghost Dogs of Moculta
In the late 1800’s, a young man working in the Barossa Valley as a delivery boy experienced a terrifying event.

Whilst travelling from the then Commercial Hotel in Angaston

(known as “The Brauhaus” since 1979.) towards Moculta, the young man crossed the small bridge over the para river. He slowed down and looked towards an old copper mine shaft on the property of Mr J.B. Bartsch. 
From the mine shaft, a drive had been cut to the bottom of the valley, which passed under the bridge. The young man sat silent on his carriage, staring into the mine shaft.

Suddenly his horses ears pricked up and the horses began to snort. They began to rear in fear as loud thumping sounds, grunting, snarling and the sound of metal upon rock filled the gully air.

Out of nowhere, in broad daylight, two large dogs appeared. Both dogs had blazing red eyes, and attached to their collars, large chains that whipped from side to side as they jumped up towards the cart – they were barking like crazy and snarling and gnashing their frothing mouths at the horses.

The young man, caught in a daze of disbelief, suddenly sprang into action and whipped at his horses to move forward. As they did, the dogs jumped on to the almost empty delivery cart, which suddenly slowed down to a crawl.

The dogs, still making maddening noises, the chains still clinking as they whipped about, suddenly leapt of the cart, which took off with a jolt, as if a great weight had been lifted from it.

The young man whipped the horses to travel as far as he could from the bridge back to his home in Moculta, adrenaline coursing through his veins at what he had seen, and what had happened.

He had no explanation for his experience, and remained unsure if the dogs were indeed ghosts, or mighty beasts that had broken their chains and become feral – either way, he found another route for his deliveries after his experience.

Ghosts of the Barossa: The Ghost Dogs of Moculta

The Ghost Dogs of Moculta

  In the late 1800s, a young man working in the Barossa Valley as a delivery boy experienced a terrifying event.

While travelling from the Commercial Hotel in Angaston (known as “The Brauhaus” since 1979.) towards Moculta, the young man crossed a small bridge over the North Para River. He slowed down and looked towards an old copper mine shaft on the property of Mr J.B. Bartsch.

  From the mine shaft, a drive had been cut to the bottom of the valley, which passed under the bridge he had just travelled over. The young man sat silently on his carriage, staring toward the mine shaft.

Suddenly his horse’s ears pricked up and the horses began to snort. They began to rear in fear as loud thumping sounds, grunting, snarling and the sound of metal upon rock filled the gully air.

  Out of nowhere, in broad daylight, two large dogs appeared. Both dogs had blazing red eyes and attached to their collars, large chains that whipped from side to side as they jumped up towards the cart. The dogs barked ferociously, snarling and gnashing their frothing mouths at the horses.

The young man, caught in a daze of disbelief, suddenly sprang into action and whipped at his horses to move forward. As they did, the dogs jumped on to the almost empty delivery cart, which suddenly slowed down to a crawl as the horses struggled with the extra, supernatural weight of the dogs.
.

The dogs, still making maddening noises, the chains still clinking as they whipped about, suddenly leapt off the cart, which took off with a jolt, as the extra weight lifted from it.

The young man whipped the horses to travel as far as he could from the bridge back to his home in Moculta. Panicking, adrenaline coursing through his veins, fear-filled his entire being. 

He had no explanation for his experience and remained unsure if the dogs were indeed ghosts, or mighty beasts that had broken their chains and become feral – either way, he found another route for his deliveries after his experience.

Have you experienced the ghost dogs of Moculta in the Barossa Valley? Let us know via the forums on Facebook.

Researched and written by Allen Tiller © 2015
The Haunts of Adelaide

A Ghost in Thebarton


A Ghost in Thebarton

In June 1906 The Register Newspaper of South Australia reported a number of disturbances of ghostly vision seen in the suburb of Thebarton.  The ghost was described as being dressed in a luminous white gown, and having in his hand a coffin like device which displayed a number of Bible scriptures and semi-scriptures.
 On Friday the 15thof June 1906, a man called in to the Thebarton Police Station in a state of panic, having just witnessed the ghost.
 The victim was riding a bicycle down Henley Beach road, and in his efforts to escape the clutches of the ghost, almost drowned in an invert at the intersection of Henley Beach road and Taylors Road.
On Saturday night a young lady witnessed the same spectre in the street as she made her way home.
 The rumour of the ghostly sightings spread very quickly around the region, and many people became afraid to venture outside, so much so, that a circus that was nearby watched its patronage numbers drop considerably as the reported ghostly sightings went up.
 As the fear spread, a wave of anger began to sweep through the area’s young men, who took to the street, vowing to find the ghost and teach it a lesson – which would have been an interesting fight if the ghost was indeed a real one!
 As citizens tried to rationalise the ghost appearance, a skeptical group arose that stated that the ghost was nothing more than the weak minds of the “victims” creating the phantom – but police soon dismissed this, as the original few reports that had not been made public, had almost identical descriptions of the ghost.
Instead, the police began to undertake a little ghost hunting themselves to try and find the young man they thought was responsible…
The ghost disappeared into the ether, and was never heard of again!

A Ghost in Thebarton


A Ghost in Thebarton

In June 1906 The Register Newspaper of South Australia reported a number of disturbances of ghostly vision seen in the suburb of Thebarton.  The ghost was described as being dressed in a luminous white gown, and having in his hand a coffin like device which displayed a number of Bible scriptures and semi-scriptures.
 On Friday the 15thof June 1906, a man called in to the Thebarton Police Station in a state of panic, having just witnessed the ghost.
 The victim was riding a bicycle down Henley Beach road, and in his efforts to escape the clutches of the ghost, almost drowned in an invert at the intersection of Henley Beach road and Taylors Road.
On Saturday night a young lady witnessed the same spectre in the street as she made her way home.
 The rumour of the ghostly sightings spread very quickly around the region, and many people became afraid to venture outside, so much so, that a circus that was nearby watched its patronage numbers drop considerably as the reported ghostly sightings went up.
 As the fear spread, a wave of anger began to sweep through the area’s young men, who took to the street, vowing to find the ghost and teach it a lesson – which would have been an interesting fight if the ghost was indeed a real one!
 As citizens tried to rationalise the ghost appearance, a skeptical group arose that stated that the ghost was nothing more than the weak minds of the “victims” creating the phantom – but police soon dismissed this, as the original few reports that had not been made public, had almost identical descriptions of the ghost.
Instead, the police began to undertake a little ghost hunting themselves to try and find the young man they thought was responsible…
The ghost disappeared into the ether, and was never heard of again!

The Phantom Accident of Lochiel


The Phantom Accident of Lochiel
Last week we took a brief look at the Haunted Ambulance and ghost nurse of Lochiel, a town located 125kms north of Adelaide, on highway 1, in the Mid North region of South Australia. This week we are going to look at another very well-known haunting in the area.

  For many years people have been seeing a car on the side of the road near Lochiel, the car looks as though it has been in a very nasty accident, possibly hitting a tree. Passers-by will look in horror at the car, pull over to help, only to find the vehicle disappear from sight as they get near it.

 This particular accident apparition has been reported for more than 3 decades, and only ever happens during severe weather conditions. Not much has changed about the story over the years, except for one small detail, of the stories passed to me, the car has kept up to date with current models – so is this in fact an urban legend?

 The stretch of road, Highway 1, approaching Lochiel from Adelaide is notorious for fatal car and truck accidents, and tragically, many people have lost their lives there. In theory, this could be a probably cause for a haunting, as events surrounding deaths of a tragic nature, and the emotions surrounding the event, could be considered as an explanation for a possible ghostly car sighting – but with that little detail of the car make and model updating as time goes on, it hints at the story being more of an urban legend.

There is always the possibility that there is some truth in the story, and rather than fade from memory, the urban legend has grown thanks to the internet, and internet jokers keeping the story alive.

 May all the people who have met tragedy on Highway 1 Rest In Peace

The Phantom Accident of Lochiel


The Phantom Accident of Lochiel

Last week we took a brief look at the Haunted Ambulance and ghost nurse of Lochiel,< Read it here>  a town located 125kms north of Adelaide, on Highway 1, in the Mid-North region of South Australia. This week we are going to look at another very well-known haunting in the area.

  For many years people have been seeing a car on the side of the road near Lochiel, the car looks as though it has been in a very nasty accident, possibly hitting a tree. Passers-by will look in horror at the car, pull over to help, only to find the vehicle disappear from sight as they approach it.

 This particular accident apparition has been reported for more than 3 decades, and only ever happens during severe weather conditions. Not much has changed about the story over the years, except for one small detail of the stories passed to me, the phantom car has kept up to date with current models – so is this, in fact, an urban legend?

 The stretch of road, Highway 1, approaching Lochiel from Adelaide is notorious for fatal car and truck accidents, and tragically, many people have lost their lives there. In theory, this could be a probable cause for a haunting, as events surrounding deaths of a tragic nature and the emotions surrounding the event could be considered as an explanation for a possible ghostly car sighting – but with that little detail of the car make and model updating as time goes on, it hints that the story is untrue. 

There is always the possibility that there is some truth in the story, and rather than fade from memory, the urban legend has grown thanks to the internet, and internet jokers keeping the story alive. Perhaps this is the case, or perhaps there is an intelligence to the haunting?
 Another theory is that the phantom car could be the image of the latest victims of that stretch of road.
 Have you experienced the phantom car accident near Lochiel? We’d love to hear from you id you have. 

Contact us at eidolon@live.com.au

 May all the people who have met tragedy on Highway 1 Rest In Peace

© 2015 Allen Tiller

Buried in the City – Colonel William Light

  
 Buried in the City – Colonel William Light
Born in Malaya in 1786, William Light was the second son of Captain Francis Light and his Princess Bride, Martinha Rozells.

 William spent the earliest part of his life at Penang, but at the age of six, was moved to England to be educated in Suffolk by Charles Doughty.
Light volunteered in the Navy in 1799, and left two years later with the title Midshipman. After which he spent some time in France and then Calcutta, before returning to Europe in 1806. In 1808 he purchased a cornetcy* in the 4th Dragoons, and was soon promoted to Lieutenant.
 Light was able to speak many languages, showed great tact, and accuracy in his reporting. This held him in great stead with his superior officers, and often led to him being chosen to be an intermediary in hostile negotiations.
 In 1812, Light was chosen to become a junior officer at Wellingtons headquarters where he would be employed on mapping, liaison duties and reconnaissance.
In 1814, Light purchased a “Captaincy of the Infantry” and spent time travelling Europe, before returning to full service working in the Channel Islands, Scotland and Ireland.
Seven years later in 1821, William Light quit the army with the rank of Major.
In 1824, Light married the Third Duke of Richmonds daughter, Mary Bennet. The newlyweds travelled extensively across Europe. Later, Light bought a yacht and sailed to Italy, then around the Mediterranean. Light visited the Egyptian city of Alexandria around 1832, at the time the economic centre of Egypt. He became friends with the powerhouse Mohammed Ali, who was rising to power in the country and would lay the foundations for modern Egypt. In 1834 Light would captain the paddle steamer “Nile” which was on its way from England to join the Egyptian Navy. The Nile would be taken over by John Hindmarsh, who would later be given a letter by Light, introducing him to Sir Charles Napier, who had recently resigned as Governor of the proposed settlement of South Australia. Hindmarsh would go on to replace Napier in that position.
In 1836, William Light was appointed Surveyor-General of South Australia. With his chosen staff, he set off for Australia in the ship “Rapid” whilst his deputy, George Kingston, set out five weeks earlier in another ship called “Cygnet”.
 Light arrived at Kangaroo Island in 1836, and visited Encounter Bay soon after, which he rejected as being a main port for the new colony. Light began to explore the coastline, and Rapid Bay caught his eye, he sailed north seeking harbours reported previously by explorers Captain Collet Barker and Captain John Jones, but to no avail. Soon the Port Adelaide River was found. Light as impressed with the location, and earmarked it as the spot for his future settlement, but first he had to follow instruction and sail to Port Lincoln to assess the possibility of that Port being the main capitol of the colony.
 Light returned to the Port Adelaide River on December 18th 1836. The site chosen was 9.6km from the ocean, and this did not please Governor Hindmarsh at all, who then set about to get the capitol site changed to Encounter Bay or Port Lincoln.
Light pressed ahead with his survey of the area, and had laid out a plan of 1042 acres by March 1837, plus twenty-nine section of Port Adelaide, as a means to pacify Hindmarsh.
 Light knew he was hard against it, the survey he been contracted to undertake was going to take many years to complete, not the few months he had been allotted when taking the contract on, so he wrote to his superiors asking for more men, equipment and time.
 His requests were rejected, and his survey was to be replaced with a faster method. If Light refused to do this, he would be put on the lesser task of coastal examination. Light promptly refused, and resigned his position, which did not improve his ailing health, for at the time Light’s health was beginning to fail considerably.
 By January 1839, William Lights health had waned, he was not able to complete a 10 hour horse ride to survey land north of Adelaide, He returned to his temporary accommodation, only
to have it burn down the following day. The fire consumed a life long collection of books, journals, maps and drawings.
 Light then moved into a house he was having built, named Theberton, he was poor in wealth and health, and survived by selling sketches.
 In May 1839, Light, despite his failing health, took part in the search for a northern route to the Murray. He returned to his home with a sever fever, and died of tuberculosis on October 6th 1839.
 Colonel William Light was buried in Adelaide, in Light Square. Governor Hindmarsh had a monument built over his grave, but unfortunately it didn’t stand the test of time. A new monument was erected in 1905.
A statue of William Light, designed by Birnie Rhind stands on Montefiore Hill, overlooking the city he founded. 
*Cortency – the office, rank, or commission of a cornet

Buried in the City – Colonel William Light

  
 Buried in the City – Colonel William Light
Born in Malaya in 1786, William Light was the second son of Captain Francis Light and his Princess Bride, Martinha Rozells.

 William spent the earliest part of his life at Penang, but at the age of six, was moved to England to be educated in Suffolk by Charles Doughty.
Light volunteered in the Navy in 1799, and left two years later with the title Midshipman. After which he spent some time in France and then Calcutta, before returning to Europe in 1806. In 1808 he purchased a cornetcy* in the 4th Dragoons, and was soon promoted to Lieutenant.
 Light was able to speak many languages, showed great tact, and accuracy in his reporting. This held him in great stead with his superior officers, and often led to him being chosen to be an intermediary in hostile negotiations.
 In 1812, Light was chosen to become a junior officer at Wellingtons headquarters where he would be employed on mapping, liaison duties and reconnaissance.
In 1814, Light purchased a “Captaincy of the Infantry” and spent time travelling Europe, before returning to full service working in the Channel Islands, Scotland and Ireland.
Seven years later in 1821, William Light quit the army with the rank of Major.
In 1824, Light married the Third Duke of Richmonds daughter, Mary Bennet. The newlyweds travelled extensively across Europe. Later, Light bought a yacht and sailed to Italy, then around the Mediterranean. Light visited the Egyptian city of Alexandria around 1832, at the time the economic centre of Egypt. He became friends with the powerhouse Mohammed Ali, who was rising to power in the country and would lay the foundations for modern Egypt. In 1834 Light would captain the paddle steamer “Nile” which was on its way from England to join the Egyptian Navy. The Nile would be taken over by John Hindmarsh, who would later be given a letter by Light, introducing him to Sir Charles Napier, who had recently resigned as Governor of the proposed settlement of South Australia. Hindmarsh would go on to replace Napier in that position.
In 1836, William Light was appointed Surveyor-General of South Australia. With his chosen staff, he set off for Australia in the ship “Rapid” whilst his deputy, George Kingston, set out five weeks earlier in another ship called “Cygnet”.
 Light arrived at Kangaroo Island in 1836, and visited Encounter Bay soon after, which he rejected as being a main port for the new colony. Light began to explore the coastline, and Rapid Bay caught his eye, he sailed north seeking harbours reported previously by explorers Captain Collet Barker and Captain John Jones, but to no avail. Soon the Port Adelaide River was found. Light as impressed with the location, and earmarked it as the spot for his future settlement, but first he had to follow instruction and sail to Port Lincoln to assess the possibility of that Port being the main capitol of the colony.
 Light returned to the Port Adelaide River on December 18th 1836. The site chosen was 9.6km from the ocean, and this did not please Governor Hindmarsh at all, who then set about to get the capitol site changed to Encounter Bay or Port Lincoln.
Light pressed ahead with his survey of the area, and had laid out a plan of 1042 acres by March 1837, plus twenty-nine section of Port Adelaide, as a means to pacify Hindmarsh.
 Light knew he was hard against it, the survey he been contracted to undertake was going to take many years to complete, not the few months he had been allotted when taking the contract on, so he wrote to his superiors asking for more men, equipment and time.
 His requests were rejected, and his survey was to be replaced with a faster method. If Light refused to do this, he would be put on the lesser task of coastal examination. Light promptly refused, and resigned his position, which did not improve his ailing health, for at the time Light’s health was beginning to fail considerably.
 By January 1839, William Lights health had waned, he was not able to complete a 10 hour horse ride to survey land north of Adelaide, He returned to his temporary accommodation, only to have it burn down the following day. The fire consumed a life long collection of books, journals, maps and drawings.
 Light then moved into a house he was having built, named Theberton, he was poor in wealth and health, and survived by selling sketches.
 In May 1839, Light, despite his failing health, took part in the search for a northern route to the Murray. He returned to his home with a sever fever, and died of tuberculosis on October 6th 1839.
 Colonel William Light was buried in Adelaide, in Light Square. Governor Hindmarsh had a monument built over his grave, but unfortunately it didn’t stand the test of time. A new monument was erected in 1905.
A statue of William Light, designed by Birnie Rhind stands on Montefiore Hill, overlooking the city he founded. 
*Cortency – the office, rank, or commission of a cornet

Dead Dog Creek

Dead Dog Creek

 

In 1868, Benjamin Ellis was a local dog catcher employed the by the Corporation of Adelaide (Adelaide Council). He was given carte blanche to shoot any unlicensed dog he found in the city boundaries and dispose of them as he saw fit.
Either lacking a good burial site, or just being plain lazy, Mr Ellis decided it was perfectly fine to dispose of the dogs bodies under a bridge in the Adelaide Botanic Gardens.
The little bridge, which crossed a little creek, was near the rear entrance of the gardens, and was often used by the public. The smell was overwhelming, and complaints began to come into the main office of the gardens. Doctor Schomburgk inspected the bridge and counted 13 dead dogs – he quickly wrote a letter of disgust to Mr Ellis – and the dead dogs soon ceased to be left in the gardens.

The following story was printed in Adelaide Observer April 11th1868
From Dr. Schomburgk, stating that the person employed by the Corporation for killing dogs threw the carcases in the creek below the Botanic Garden, I and requesting that the nuisance might be removed.
In reply, Benjamin Ellis wrote, admitting that some dogs had been thrown there, but that since the complaint he had removed them.
His Worship said the Act distinctly required that the carcases should be buried. Mr. Sundry considered that Mr. Ellis was deserving of severe censure; but he apprehended he was employed by the Registrar of Dogs.
The Town Clerk, in reply to Mr. Bundey, said the man had received fees for the dogs upon making declaration that they were buried.
Mr. Bundey considered certainly some steps should be taken, and if the thing was brought before the Council again he would see that steps were taken to prosecute the party for obtaining money under false pretences.
His Worship pointed out that according to the Act the fee was only to be paid on a declaration being made such as to satisfy a Justice of the Peace. Then, if the man committed perjury, he could be prosecuted.
The Council resolved that no fees be paid without a certificate from a Justice of the Peace

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Dead Dog Creek – Adelaide Botanic Gardens

Dead Dog Creek – Adelaide Botanic Gardens

 

   In 1868, Benjamin Ellis was a local dog catcher employed by the Corporation of Adelaide (Adelaide Council). He was given carte blanche to shoot any unlicensed dog he found in the city boundaries and dispose of them as he saw fit.
   Either lacking a good burial site or just being plain lazy, Mr Ellis decided it was perfectly fine to dispose of the dead dog bodies under a bridge in the Adelaide Botanic Gardens.
  The little bridge, which crossed a little creek, was near the rear entrance of the gardens and was often used by the public. The smell was overwhelming, and complaints began to come into the main office of the Botanic Gardens. Doctor Schomburgk inspected the bridge and counted 13 dead dogs – he quickly wrote a letter of disgust to Mr Ellis – and the dead dogs soon ceased to be left in the gardens.

The following story was printed in Adelaide Observer, April 11th1868;

From Dr Schomburgk, stating that the person employed by the Corporation for killing dogs threw the carcases in the creek below the Botanic Garden, I and requesting that the nuisance might be removed.
In reply, Benjamin Ellis wrote, admitting that some dogs had been thrown there, but that since the complaint he had removed them.

His Worship said the Act distinctly required that the carcases should be buried. Mr. Sundry considered that Mr. Ellis was deserving of severe censure; but he apprehended he was employed by the Registrar of Dogs.

The Town Clerk, in reply to Mr. Bundey, said the man had received fees for the dogs upon making declaration that they were buried.

Mr Bundey considered certainly some steps should be taken, and if the thing was brought before the Council again he would see that steps were taken to prosecute the party for obtaining money under false pretences.

His Worship pointed out that according to the Act the fee was only to be paid on a declaration being made such as to satisfy a Justice of the Peace. Then, if the man committed perjury, he could be prosecuted.
The Council resolved that no fees be paid without a certificate from a Justice of the Peace.

  An interesting side note to this story is that a Benjamin Ellis, in this same period was also the hangman at Adelaide Gaol, and is today rumoured to haunt the gaol. 

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