Tag Archives: eidolon

Haunted Highercombe Hotel Museum

Haunted Highercombe Hotel Museum

 

Every year I have the pleasure of visiting locations haunted locations around Australia. 2015 was no different, with investigations at the Boggo Road Gaol in Queensland, Geelong Gaol, Beechworth Lunatic Asylum in Victoria and a return to Woodford Academy in New South Wales. In South Australia, the journey has taken in Old Adelaide Gaol, The Cornucopia Hotel in Wallaroo, investigations in Willunga, Kapunda, Gladstone and Edinburgh, but one of the more interesting locations for me, this year has been a small scale investigation in a historic location, the Highercombe Hotel Museum in Tea Tree Gully.

In 1853 when the Highercombe Hotel was built in the town of “Steventon”, now known as Tea Tree Gully. The population was of a reasonable size, but not one big enough to support the Highercombe Hotel and the Tea Tree Gully Inn which stood across the road. The Highercombe Hotel had a short-lived existence as a local pub, closing its doors as a hotel only 24 years after opening.

 The Tea Tree Gully Hotel became a major stopping point for stagecoaches and horse riders after the main road in the area was diverted right past its front door.

 The northern side of the Highercombe Hotel building served as the local post office and post-masters residence from 1879 until 1963. From 1875 until 1934 the southern side of the building was lived in by the headteacher of the Tea Tree Gully Public School. After this, for 20 years from 1930, the southern side was rented to the Hughes family as a private residence.

 For a small period in the 1960s the building served as the library and office for the Tea Tre Gully Council, until it was bequeathed to the National Trust in 1967 when it’s life as a museum was imagined.

In 2015 the site has been renamed “The Tea Tree Gully Heritage Museum” and is run entirely by volunteers

Whilst I have found no deaths in my current research on the building that could lend credence to a possible haunting, the building contains a number of personal effects that could promote the theory of “attachment”. “Attachment” is the theory that some paranormal investigators subscribe too, that some objects are so loved and adored by their owners or had such importance in their lives, that, in death, they still cannot bear to part with the object. This, in turn, leads to sightings of the spirit near its beloved object – as would appear to be the case here in this building.

 One sighting has been of a young girl sitting in front of the fireplace in the large downstairs sitting-room at the entrance side of the Hotel. This teenage girl has been seen briefly by volunteers, sitting quietly, as if enjoying, or warming herself in front of the fire.

 Whilst investigating with my team, Eidolon Paranormal, and friend Karina Eames, we had our own brief unexplained experience in an upstairs room when reading poetry that was bequeathed to the museum in an estate. Whilst Karina and Karen were reading the poetry aloud, another investigator witnessed a small white light pass between two investigators and then vanish – at the same time goosebumps and coldness was felt by the investigators.

 At this stage we are still reviewing our investigation data, and looking towards further investigations in the former hotel to uncover who could possibly be haunting the building.

 

The museum can be visited by the public on open days or through group bookings by visiting the volunteer society’s website at – http://www.highercombemuseum.on.net/

  Allen Tiller is the Australian star of the international hit television show “Haunting: Australia” and author of “The Haunts of Adelaide – History, Mystery and the Paranormal” as well as being a historian, lecturer, poet, musician, Tour Guide, blogger and podcaster. Allen is also a volunteer for many different associations and groups.

You can find Allen online at:

http://www.twitter.com/Allen_Tiller

http://www.facebook.com/AllenHauntingAustralia

https://www.facebook.com/TheHauntsOfAdelaide

First published in MEGAscene issue 5 2016

© Allen Tiller

People, Places & Ghosts: A History of Salisbury & Surrounds

People, Places & Ghosts: A History of Salisbury & Surrounds

Celebrate History Month with nostalgia, history and a ghost story or two with South Australia’s award-winning paranormal historian Allen Tiller.

Step back in time as Allen presents a nostalgic look at some of Salisbury’s most notable places, buildings and people whilst showcasing photos from the Salisbury Local History Collection

Light refreshments provided.

Date And Time

Thu., 9 May 2019, 6:00 pm ACST

Location

Para Hills Community Hub
22 Wilkinson Road
Para Hills, SA 5096

TICKETS: $5

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/people-placesand-ghosts-a-history-of-salisbury-and-surrounds-tickets-56083781099?fbclid=IwAR1Tc4uQj9Dw7lSAWb4EtngfEPGmuvV4eRddy7dxt-jxSywMoMY_5fkhlng

Psychology: Legend Tripping

Legend Tripping

(first published on the “Eidolon Blog” on


“Let’s go legend tripping!” doesn’t have the same impact as “let’s go ghost hunting!”, but for some ghost hunters, it is exactly what they are doing!

“Whatchoo talkin’ ‘bout Allen?” I hear you say.

What I am talking about is a thing called “ostension”, a term which is explained in the Mirriam-Webster Dictionary as “an act or process of showing, pointing out or exhibiting”. The word comes from the Latin word ‘ostendere’, which means ‘to show’.

Ostension is the act of making an action to explain a word without saying the word, such as “flippin’ the bird” to say…well you know what it means…

Way back last century, in 1983, an article was published titled “Does the word ‘dog’ bite? Ostensive Action as a Means of Legend Telling” by folklorists, Linda Degh and Andrew Vazsonyi.

Basically this article laid out the foundations of what folklorists termed “legend tripping”, the act of engaging in “playacting” involving supernatural elements, of which ghost hunting is the most common, but also of which Bigfoot hunting, werewolf hunting and other aspects of the paranormal fall under.

In a book published this century, “Aliens, Ghosts and Cult: Legends We Live” by Bill Ellis. Mr Ellis, a folklorist delves further into the world ostension, pointing out that many ghost hunters take themselves quite seriously, and the ‘work’ they do and would never consider that they are, in fact,

playacting.

There are numerous ghost hunting teams that venture out into the dark with their gadgets, try and confront supernatural beings or ghosts with an onslaught of questions, then return to the safety of their home, secure in the knowledge they have taken on the unknown, and won. There is no research into the locations history, how their equipment actually works, what it is used for in the real world, and its actual capabilities. There is no investigation into natural explanations, weather patterns, psychology or anything else for that matter – it is in essence, exactly what the folklorists state it is “play acting”.

Bill Ellis wrapped it up rather well in his previously mentioned book with this quote (ghost hunters) “venture out to challenge supernatural beings, confront them in consciously dramatized form, then return to safety. … The stated purpose of such activities is not entertainment but a sincere effort to test and define boundaries of the ‘real’ world.’ “

Back to the article by Degh and Vazsonyi. Essentially what the writers are trying to convey is that if a “legend” is widely known and exposed to a wide audience, some members of that audience will engage themselves in actualising or ‘living’ the ‘legend’ or parts of the narrative associated with it. In the paranormal industry, this would be the aspect of ghost hunting that involves persons who want to copy their favourite ghost hunting TV star and live out what they see on TV, for the thrill and for the status.

There is a distinct difference between the casual ghost hunter and the serious paranormal investigator, but at the end of the day, even the serious paranormal investigator can engage in “legend tripping”, and the casual ghost hunter can become a serious paranormal researcher and investigator, but at the end of the day we have to ask ourselves, are we getting involved in other people’s legends when we investigate the paranormal and living out their expectations of what will happen, or are we going in armed with research, knowledge and no expectations?

Psychology: Legend Tripping

Legend Tripping

(first published on the “Eidolon Blog” on


“Let’s go legend tripping!” doesn’t have the same impact as “let’s go ghost hunting!”, but for some ghost hunters, it is exactly what they are doing!

“Whatchoo talkin’ ‘bout Allen?” I hear you say.

What I am talking about is a thing called “ostension”, a term which is explained in the Mirriam-Webster Dictionary as “an act or process of showing, pointing out or exhibiting”. The word comes from the Latin word ‘ostendere’, which means ‘to show’.

Ostension is the act of making an action to explain a word without saying the word, such as “flippin’ the bird” to say…well you know what it means…

Way back last century, in 1983, an article was published titled “Does the word ‘dog’ bite? Ostensive Action as a Means of Legend Telling” by folklorists, Linda Degh and Andrew Vazsonyi.

Basically this article laid out the foundations of what folklorists termed “legend tripping”, the act of engaging in “playacting” involving supernatural elements, of which ghost hunting is the most common, but also of which Bigfoot hunting, werewolf hunting and other aspects of the paranormal fall under.

In a book published this century, “Aliens, Ghosts and Cult: Legends We Live” by Bill Ellis. Mr Ellis, a folklorist delves further into the world ostension, pointing out that many ghost hunters take themselves quite seriously, and the ‘work’ they do and would never consider that they are, in fact,

playacting.

There are numerous ghost hunting teams that venture out into the dark with their gadgets, try and confront supernatural beings or ghosts with an onslaught of questions, then return to the safety of their home, secure in the knowledge they have taken on the unknown, and won. There is no research into the locations history, how their equipment actually works, what it is used for in the real world, and its actual capabilities. There is no investigation into natural explanations, weather patterns, psychology or anything else for that matter – it is in essence, exactly what the folklorists state it is “play acting”.

Bill Ellis wrapped it up rather well in his previously mentioned book with this quote (ghost hunters) “venture out to challenge supernatural beings, confront them in consciously dramatized form, then return to safety. … The stated purpose of such activities is not entertainment but a sincere effort to test and define boundaries of the ‘real’ world.’ “

Back to the article by Degh and Vazsonyi. Essentially what the writers are trying to convey is that if a “legend” is widely known and exposed to a wide audience, some members of that audience will engage themselves in actualising or ‘living’ the ‘legend’ or parts of the narrative associated with it. In the paranormal industry, this would be the aspect of ghost hunting that involves persons who want to copy their favourite ghost hunting TV star and live out what they see on TV, for the thrill and for the status.

There is a distinct difference between the casual ghost hunter and the serious paranormal investigator, but at the end of the day, even the serious paranormal investigator can engage in “legend tripping”, and the casual ghost hunter can become a serious paranormal researcher and investigator, but at the end of the day we have to ask ourselves, are we getting involved in other people’s legends when we investigate the paranormal and living out their expectations of what will happen, or are we going in armed with research, knowledge and no expectations?

Haunted Highercombe Hotel


Highercombe Hotel Museum
Recently Eidolon Paranormal had the pleasure of investigating the Highercombe Hotel Museum, with thanks to our friend Karina Eames. As far as we are aware, only (another friend) Icey Paranormal has previously investigated the building for spirit activity.
 History
In 1853 when the Highercombe Hotel was built, the town of Tea Tree Gully was known as “Steventon” and contained a reasonable population, but not one big enough to support the Highercombe Hotel and the Tea Tree Gully Inn which stands across the road. The Highercombe closed its doors as a hotel only 24 years after opening.
 The Tea Tree Gully Hotel became a major stopping point for stage coaches and horse riders after the main road in the area was diverted right past its front door.
 The northern side of the Hotel building served as the local post office and post masters residence from 1879 until 1963. From 1875 until 1934 the southern side of the building was lived in by the head teacher of the Tea Tree Gully Public School. After this, for 20 years from 1930, the southern side was rented to the Hughes family as a private residence.
 For a small period in the 1960’s the building served as the library and office for the Tea Tree Gully Council, until it was bequeathed to the National Trust in 1967, when it’s life as a museum was imagined.
In 2015 the site has been renamed The Tea Tree Gully Heritage Museum and is run entirely by volunteers
Whilst we have found no deaths in our research on the building that could lend credence to a possible haunting, the building contains a number of personal effects that could promote the theory of “attachment”. “Attachment” is the theory that some paranormal investigators subscribe too that some objects are so loved and adored by their owners, or had such importance in their lives, that, in death, they still cannot bare to part with it. This in turns leads to sightings of the spirit near its beloved object – as would appear to be the case here in this building.
 One sighting has been of a young girl sitting in front of the fire place in the large downstairs sitting room at the entrance side of the Hotel. This teenage girl has been seen briefly by volunteers, sitting quietly, as if enjoying, or warming herself in front of the fire.
 We had our own brief unexplained experience in an upstairs room when reading poetry that was bequeathed to the museum in an estate. Whilst Karina and Karen were reading the poetry aloud, another investigator witnessed a small white light pass between two investigators and then vanish – at the same time goosebumps and coldness was felt by the investigators.
 At this stage we are still reviewing our investigation data, and looking towards further investigations in the former hotel to uncover whom could possibly be haunting the building,.

Haunted Highercombe Hotel


Highercombe Hotel Museum
Recently Eidolon Paranormal had the pleasure of investigating the Highercombe Hotel Museum, with thanks to our friend Karina Eames. As far as we are aware, only (another friend) Icey Paranormal has previously investigated the building for spirit activity.
 History
In 1853 when the Highercombe Hotel was built, the town of Tea Tree Gully was known as “Steventon” and contained a reasonable population, but not one big enough to support the Highercombe Hotel and the Tea Tree Gully Inn which stands across the road. The Highercombe closed its doors as a hotel only 24 years after opening.
 The Tea Tree Gully Hotel became a major stopping point for stage coaches and horse riders after the main road in the area was diverted right past its front door.
 The northern side of the Hotel building served as the local post office and post masters residence from 1879 until 1963. From 1875 until 1934 the southern side of the building was lived in by the head teacher of the Tea Tree Gully Public School. After this, for 20 years from 1930, the southern side was rented to the Hughes family as a private residence.
 For a small period in the 1960’s the building served as the library and office for the Tea Tree Gully Council, until it was bequeathed to the National Trust in 1967, when it’s life as a museum was imagined.
In 2015 the site has been renamed The Tea Tree Gully Heritage Museum and is run entirely by volunteers
Whilst we have found no deaths in our research on the building that could lend credence to a possible haunting, the building contains a number of personal effects that could promote the theory of “attachment”. “Attachment” is the theory that some paranormal investigators subscribe too that some objects are so loved and adored by their owners, or had such importance in their lives, that, in death, they still cannot bare to part with it. This in turns leads to sightings of the spirit near its beloved object – as would appear to be the case here in this building.
 One sighting has been of a young girl sitting in front of the fire place in the large downstairs sitting room at the entrance side of the Hotel. This teenage girl has been seen briefly by volunteers, sitting quietly, as if enjoying, or warming herself in front of the fire.
 We had our own brief unexplained experience in an upstairs room when reading poetry that was bequeathed to the museum in an estate. Whilst Karina and Karen were reading the poetry aloud, another investigator witnessed a small white light pass between two investigators and then vanish – at the same time goosebumps and coldness was felt by the investigators.
 At this stage we are still reviewing our investigation data, and looking towards further investigations in the former hotel to uncover whom could possibly be haunting the building,.

The Ghost of Bentley’s Hill


The Ghost of Bentley’s Hill

Still in the Southern Flinders Ranges, only 4.5km’s from Wirrabara is a local landmark named “Bentley’s Hill”.

 The local legends insists the hill is named after the Bentley family who owned the land in the region back in the late 1800’s.

 Apparently, Mrs Bentley died very suddenly, much to the surprise of friends and was buried. A rumour took hold in the local area that her death may not have been accidental. The Police began inquiries, which led the detectives to exhume Mrs Bentley’ body. Upon inspection of the body, it became evident that Mrs Bentley had been smothered to death.

Mr Bentley was arrested and charged with the murder of his wife, he was released on bail, and absconded, never to be seen or heard of again.

It has been said, that the ghost of Mrs Bentley haunts the property upon which she was killed, and is seen around the anniversary of her murder. It is reported that whenever her spirit is about, the water in the creek will refuse to flow!

Mrs Bentley is buried in the Mount Remarkable Cemetery

Whilst there may be truth to the story, I have not, as of yet, found a newspaper article or police report that confirms the arrest of Mr Bentley, nor the murder of Mrs Bentley

The Ghost of Bentley’s Hill


The Ghost of Bentley’s Hill

   In the Southern Flinders Ranges, only 4.5km’s from Wirrabara is a local landmark named “Bentley’s Hill”.

 The hill is thought to be named after the Bentley family who owned the land in the region back in the late 1800’s.

  Mrs Bentley died very suddenly, much to the surprise of friends and family. Her funeral was held very hastily and she was buried.
  A rumour took hold in the local area that her death may not have been accidental. The Police began inquiries, which led the detectives to exhume Mrs Bentley’ body. Upon inspection of the body, it became evident that Mrs Bentley had been smothered to death.


  Mr Bentley was arrested and charged with the murder of his wife. He was released on bail, and absconded, never to be seen or heard of again.

It has been said, that the ghost of Mrs Bentley haunts the property upon which she was killed, and is seen around the anniversary of her murder. It is reported that whenever her spirit is about, the water in the creek will refuse to flow!

Mrs Bentley is buried in the Mount Remarkable Cemetery.

Whilst there may be truth to the story, I have not, as of yet, found a newspaper article or police report that confirms the arrest of Mr Bentley, nor the murder of Mrs Bentley… to be continued…

©2015 Allen Tiller

The Lochiel Nurse


The Lochiel Nurse
I first heard this story many years ago, and traveled up to Lochiel very early on in my career as a paranormal investigator, for a private house investigation. Whilst there I looked diligently for the vehicle that I am about to speak of, but to no avail.
Lochiel is a little town located about 125kms north of Adelaide on Highway 1. The area has an interesting history, and has been home to coal mines, wheat farmers and the salt farmers, who collect salt from Bumbunga Lake Nearby.…the area even spawned the micro nation of “The Province of Bumbunga”
Many years ago, Lochiel used to have its own town ambulance, an old 60’s style machine that saw many many years of service. Often patients would get to hospital and ask who the nurse was that had

been caring for them, as she seemed a little old fashioned, and wore a uniform that seemed out of date and very much unlike modern nurses uniforms. Of course the driver and attendants would have no clue what the patient was talking about – but over the years it happened so often it could no longer be ignored – however, no-one ever solved the mystery of who the nurse could be, or why she chose to help the people of Lochiel.

 I heard many years ago that the ambulance in question was put into retirement a long time ago, and sat in the yard of local for many years – I have no clue to its where about today, but would love to know what happened too it. So if you know, or you experienced a ride with this ghostly nurse, please feel free to drop me a line at eidolon@live.com.au

The Ghost of the Lochiel Nurse


The Ghost of the Lochiel Nurse

I first heard this story many years ago, and travelled up to Lochiel very early on in my career as a paranormal investigator, for a private house investigation. Whilst there I looked diligently for the vehicle that I am about to speak of but to no avail.
Lochiel is a little town located about 125kms north of Adelaide on Highway 1. The area has an interesting history and has been home to coal mines, wheat farmers and the salt farmers, who collect salt from Bumbunga Lake Nearby.…the area even spawned the micronation of “The Province of Bumbunga”
Many years ago, Lochiel used to have its own town ambulance, an old 60’s style machine that saw many many years of service. Often patients would get to the hospital and ask who the nurse was that had

been caring for them, as she seemed a little old fashioned, and wore a uniform that seemed out of date and very much, unlike modern nurses uniforms. Of course, the driver and attendants would have no clue what the patient was talking about – but over the years it happened so often it could no longer be ignored – however, no-one ever solved the mystery of who the nurse could be, or why she chose to help the people of Lochiel.

 I heard many years ago that the ambulance in question was put into retirement a long time ago, and sat in the yard of local for many years – I have no clue to its whereabouts today, but would love to know what happened too it. So if you know, or you experienced a ride with this ghostly nurse, please feel free to drop me a line at eidolon@live.com.au

© 2015 Allen Tiller